Material Footprint of Low-Income Households in Finland-Consequences for the Sustainability Debate

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http://hdl.handle.net/10138/159646

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Lettenmeier , M , Hirvilammi , T , Laakso , S , Lahteenoja , S & Aalto , K 2012 , ' Material Footprint of Low-Income Households in Finland-Consequences for the Sustainability Debate ' , Sustainability , vol. 4 , no. 7 , pp. 1426-1447 . https://doi.org/10.3390/su4071426

Title: Material Footprint of Low-Income Households in Finland-Consequences for the Sustainability Debate
Author: Lettenmeier, Michael; Hirvilammi, Tuuli; Laakso, Senja; Lahteenoja, Satu; Aalto, Kristiina
Contributor: University of Helsinki, Environmental Sciences
Date: 2012
Language: eng
Number of pages: 22
Belongs to series: Sustainability
ISSN: 2071-1050
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/10138/159646
Abstract: The article assesses the material footprints of households living on a minimum amount of social benefits in Finland and discusses the consequences in terms of ecological and social sustainability. The data were collected using interviews and a questionnaire on the consumption patterns of 18 single households. The results are compared to a study on households with varying income levels, to average consumption patterns and to decent minimum reference budgets. The low-income households have lower material footprints than average and most of the material footprints are below the socially sustainable level of consumption, which is based on decent minimum reference budgets. However, the amount of resources used by most of the households studied here is still at least double that required for ecological sustainability. The simultaneous existence of both deprivation and overconsumption requires measures from both politicians and companies to make consumption sustainable. For example, both adequate housing and economic mobility need to be addressed. Measures to improve the social sustainability of low-income households should target reducing the material footprints of more affluent households. Furthermore, the concept of what constitutes a decent life should be understood more universally than on the basis of standards of material consumption.
Subject: consumption
household
social sustainability
income
sufficiency
ecological sustainability
natural resources
MIPS
material footprint
ecological backpack
NATURAL-RESOURCE CONSUMPTION
ENVIRONMENTAL JUSTICE
TRANSPORT
EQUITY
SPACE
1172 Environmental sciences
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