Comparative Analysis of Prokaryotic Communities Associated with Organic and Conventional Farming Systems

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Pershina , E , Valkonen , J P T , Kurki , P , Ivanova , E , Chirak , E , Korvigo , I , Provorov , N & Andronov , E 2015 , ' Comparative Analysis of Prokaryotic Communities Associated with Organic and Conventional Farming Systems ' , PLoS One , vol. 10 , no. 12 , 0145072 . https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0145072

Title: Comparative Analysis of Prokaryotic Communities Associated with Organic and Conventional Farming Systems
Author: Pershina, Elizaveta; Valkonen, Jari Pekka Tapani; Kurki, Paivi; Ivanova, Ekaterina; Chirak, Evgeny; Korvigo, Ilia; Provorov, Nykolay; Andronov, Evgeny
Contributor: University of Helsinki, Department of Agricultural Sciences
Date: 2015-12-18
Language: eng
Number of pages: 16
Belongs to series: PLoS One
ISSN: 1932-6203
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/10138/160580
Abstract: One of the most important challenges in agriculture is to determine the effectiveness and environmental impact of certain farming practices. The aim of present study was to determine and compare the taxonomic composition of the microbiomes established in soil following long-term exposure (14 years) to a conventional and organic farming systems (CFS and OFS accordingly). Soil from unclared forest next to the fields was used as a control. The analysis was based on RT-PCR and pyrosequencing of 16S rRNA genes of bacteria and archaea. The number of bacteria was significantly lower in CFS than in OFS and woodland. The highest amount of archaea was detected in woodland, whereas the amounts in CFS and OFS were lower and similar. The most common phyla in the soil microbial communities analyzed were Proteobacteria (57.9%), Acidobacteria (16.1%), Actinobacteria (7.9%), Verrucomicrobia (2.0%), Bacteroidetes (2.7%) and Firmicutes (4.8%). Woodland soil differed from croplands in the taxonomic composition of microbial phyla. Croplands were enriched with Proteobacteria (mainly the genus Pseudomonas), while Acidobacteria were detected almost exclusively in woodland soil. The most pronounced differences between the CFS and OFS microbiomes were found within the genus Pseudomonas, which significantly (p<0,05) increased its number in CFS soil compared to OFS. Other differences in microbiomes of cropping systems concerned minor taxa. A higher relative abundance of bacteria belonging to the families Oxalobacteriaceae, Koribacteriaceae, Nakamurellaceae and genera Ralstonia, Paenibacillus and Pedobacter was found in CFS as compared with OFS. On the other hand, microbiomes of OFS were enriched with proteobacteria of the family Comamonadaceae (genera Hylemonella) and Hyphomicrobiaceae, actinobacteria from the family Micrococcaceae, and bacteria of the genera Geobacter, Methylotenera, Rhizobium (mainly Rhizobium leguminosarum) and Clostridium. Thus, the fields under OFS and CFS did not differ greatly for the composition of the microbiome. These results, which were also confirmed by cluster analysis, indicated that microbial communities in the field soil do not necessarily differ largely between conventional and organic farming systems.
Subject: SOIL BACTERIAL COMMUNITIES
RIBOSOMAL-RNA
PSEUDOMONAS-FLUORESCENS
MICROBIAL COMMUNITIES
DIVERSITY
MANAGEMENT
ROOTS
STRATIFICATION
FERTILIZATION
AGRICULTURE
4111 Agronomy
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