Detecting signatures of positive selection associated with musical aptitude in the human genome

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http://hdl.handle.net/10138/160990

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Liu , X , Kanduri , C , Oikkonen , J , Karma , K , Raijas , P , Ukkola-Vuoti , L , Teo , Y-Y & Jarvela , I 2016 , ' Detecting signatures of positive selection associated with musical aptitude in the human genome ' , Scientific Reports , vol. 6 , 21198 . https://doi.org/10.1038/srep21198

Title: Detecting signatures of positive selection associated with musical aptitude in the human genome
Author: Liu, Xuanyao; Kanduri, Chakravarthi; Oikkonen, Jaana; Karma, Kai; Raijas, Pirre; Ukkola-Vuoti, Liisa; Teo, Yik-Ying; Jarvela, Irma
Contributor: University of Helsinki, Irma Järvelä / Principal Investigator
University of Helsinki, Medicum
University of Helsinki, Department of Medical and Clinical Genetics
University of Helsinki, Medicum
Date: 2016-02-16
Language: eng
Number of pages: 9
Belongs to series: Scientific Reports
ISSN: 2045-2322
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/10138/160990
Abstract: Abilities related to musical aptitude appear to have a long history in human evolution. To elucidate the molecular and evolutionary background of musical aptitude, we compared genome-wide genotyping data (641 K SNPs) of 148 Finnish individuals characterized for musical aptitude. We assigned signatures of positive selection in a case-control setting using three selection methods: haploPS, XP-EHH and F-ST. Gene ontology classification revealed that the positive selection regions contained genes affecting inner-ear development. Additionally, literature survey has shown that several of the identified genes were known to be involved in auditory perception (e.g. GPR98, USH2A), cognition and memory (e.g. GRIN2B, IL1A, IL1B, RAPGEF5), reward mechanisms (RGS9), and song perception and production of songbirds (e.g. FOXP1, RGS9, GPR98, GRIN2B). Interestingly, genes related to inner-ear development and cognition were also detected in a previous genome-wide association study of musical aptitude. However, the candidate genes detected in this study were not reported earlier in studies of musical abilities. Identification of genes related to language development (FOXP1 and VLDLR) support the popular hypothesis that music and language share a common genetic and evolutionary background. The findings are consistent with the evolutionary conservation of genes related to auditory processes in other species and provide first empirical evidence for signatures of positive selection for abilities that contribute to musical aptitude.
Subject: BASAL GANGLIA
CONVERGENT EVOLUTION
MOLECULAR EVOLUTION
LANGUAGE
SPEECH
GENES
FOXP2
POPULATIONS
COGNITION
BEHAVIOR
3111 Biomedicine
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