Diagnosing Depression in Chronic Pain Patients : DSM-IV Major Depressive Disorder vs. Beck Depression Inventory (BDI)

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http://hdl.handle.net/10138/162216

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Knaster , P , Estlander , A-M , Karlsson , H , Kaprio , J & Kalso , E 2016 , ' Diagnosing Depression in Chronic Pain Patients : DSM-IV Major Depressive Disorder vs. Beck Depression Inventory (BDI) ' , PLoS One , vol. 11 , no. 3 , 0151982 . https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0151982

Title: Diagnosing Depression in Chronic Pain Patients : DSM-IV Major Depressive Disorder vs. Beck Depression Inventory (BDI)
Author: Knaster, Peter; Estlander, Ann-Mari; Karlsson, Hasse; Kaprio, Jaakko; Kalso, Eija
Contributor: University of Helsinki, Department of Diagnostics and Therapeutics
University of Helsinki, Clinicum
University of Helsinki, Jaakko Kaprio / Principal Investigator
University of Helsinki, Clinicum
Date: 2016-03-23
Language: eng
Number of pages: 9
Belongs to series: PLoS One
ISSN: 1932-6203
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/10138/162216
Abstract: Background Diagnosing depression in chronic pain is challenging due to overlapping somatic symptoms. In questionnaires, such as the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI), responses may be influenced more by pain than by the severity of depression. In addition, previous studies have suggested that symptoms of negative self-image, a key element in depression, are uncommon in chronic pain-related depression. The object of this study is to assess the relationship of the somatic and cognitive-emotional items of BDI with the diagnosis of depression, pain intensity, and disability. Methods One hundred consecutive chronic pain patients completed the Structured Clinical Interview for DSM Disorders (SCID) for the diagnosis of major depressive disorder (MDD) according to DSM-IV. Two subscales of BDI (negative view of self and somatic-physical function) were created according to the factor model presented by Morley. Results In the regression analysis, the somatic-physical function factor associated with MDD, while the negative view of self factor did not. Patients with MDD had higher scores in several of the BDI items when analysed separately. Insomnia and weight loss were not dependent on the depression diagnosis. Limitations The relatively small sample size and the selected patient sample limit the generalisability of the results. Conclusions Somatic symptoms of depression are also common in chronic pain and should not be excluded when diagnosing depression in pain patients. Regardless of the assessment method, diagnosing depression in chronic pain remains a challenge and requires careful interpretation of symptoms.
Subject: MEDICALLY ILL
PSYCHIATRIC OUTPATIENTS
CANCER-PATIENTS
OLDER-ADULTS
PRIMARY-CARE
BACK-PAIN
SYMPTOMS
PREVALENCE
VALIDITY
CRITERIA
3126 Surgery, anesthesiology, intensive care, radiology
3124 Neurology and psychiatry
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