Interrelationships between education, occupational class and income as determinants of sickness absence among young employees in 2002-2007 and 2008-2013

Show full item record



Permalink

http://hdl.handle.net/10138/164268

Citation

Sumanen , H , Pietilainen , O , Lahti , J , Lahelma , E & Rahkonen , O 2015 , ' Interrelationships between education, occupational class and income as determinants of sickness absence among young employees in 2002-2007 and 2008-2013 ' , BMC Public Health , vol. 15 , 332 . https://doi.org/10.1186/s12889-015-1718-1

Title: Interrelationships between education, occupational class and income as determinants of sickness absence among young employees in 2002-2007 and 2008-2013
Author: Sumanen, Hilla; Pietilainen, Olli; Lahti, Jouni; Lahelma, Eero; Rahkonen, Ossi
Contributor: University of Helsinki, Clinicum
University of Helsinki, Clinicum
University of Helsinki, Clinicum
University of Helsinki, Clinicum
University of Helsinki, Clinicum
Date: 2015-04-08
Language: eng
Number of pages: 8
Belongs to series: BMC Public Health
ISSN: 1471-2458
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/10138/164268
Abstract: Background: A low socioeconomic position (SEP) is consistently associated with ill health, sickness absence (SA) and permanent disability, but studies among young employees are lacking. We examined the interrelationships between education, occupational class and income as determinants of SA among 25-34-year-old employees. We also examined, whether the association between SEP and SA varied over time in 2002-2007 and 2008-2013. Methods: The analyses covered young, 25-34-year-old women and men employed by the City of Helsinki over the time periods 2002-2007 and 2008-2013. Four-level education and occupational class classifications were used, as well as income quartiles. The outcome measure was the number of annual SA days. Results: Education had the strongest and most consistent independent association with SA among women and men in both periods under study. Occupational class had weaker independent and less consistent association with SA. Income had an independent association with SA, which strengthened over time among the men. The interrelationships between the SEP indicators and SA were partly explained by prior or mediated through subsequent SEP indicators. Socioeconomic differences followed only partially a gradient for occupational class and also for income among men. Conclusions: Preventive measures to reduce the risk of SA should be considered, especially among young employees with a basic or lower-secondary education.
Subject: Young employees
Socioeconomic position
Education
Occupational class
Income
Sickness absence
Work disability
Gender
SOCIOECONOMIC DIFFERENCES
HEALTH INEQUALITIES
MUNICIPAL EMPLOYEES
WHITEHALL-II
POSITION
TIME
3142 Public health care science, environmental and occupational health
Rights:


Files in this item

Total number of downloads: Loading...

Files Size Format View
art_3A10.1186_2Fs12889_015_1718_1.pdf 384.5Kb PDF View/Open

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show full item record