Socioeconomic differences in the use of ill-defined causes of death in 16 European countries

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Kulhanova , I , Menvielle , G , Bopp , M , Borrell , C , Deboosere , P , Eikemo , T A , Hoffmann , R , Leinsalu , M , Martikainen , P , Regidor , E , Rodriguez-Sanz , M , Rychtarikova , J , Wojtyniak , B & Mackenbach , J P 2014 , ' Socioeconomic differences in the use of ill-defined causes of death in 16 European countries ' BMC Public Health , vol. 14 , 1295 . DOI: 10.1186/1471-2458-14-1295

Title: Socioeconomic differences in the use of ill-defined causes of death in 16 European countries
Author: Kulhanova, Ivana; Menvielle, Gwenn; Bopp, Matthias; Borrell, Carme; Deboosere, Patrick; Eikemo, Terje A.; Hoffmann, Rasmus; Leinsalu, Mall; Martikainen, Pekka; Regidor, Enrique; Rodriguez-Sanz, Maica; Rychtarikova, Jitka; Wojtyniak, Bogdan; Mackenbach, Johan P.
Contributor: University of Helsinki, Sociology
Date: 2014-12-17
Language: eng
Number of pages: 8
Belongs to series: BMC Public Health
ISSN: 1471-2458
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/10138/164300
Abstract: Background: Cause-of-death data linked to information on socioeconomic position form one of the most important sources of information about health inequalities in many countries. The proportion of deaths from ill-defined conditions is one of the indicators of the quality of cause-of-death data. We investigated educational differences in the use of ill-defined causes of death in official mortality statistics. Methods: Using age-standardized mortality rates from 16 European countries, we calculated the proportion of all deaths in each educational group that were classified as due to "Symptoms, signs and ill-defined conditions". We tested if this proportion differed across educational groups using Chi-square tests. Results: The proportion of ill-defined causes of death was lower than 6.5% among men and 4.5% among women in all European countries, without any clear geographical pattern. This proportion statistically significantly differed by educational groups in several countries with in most cases a higher proportion among less than secondary educated people compared with tertiary educated people. Conclusions: We found evidence for educational differences in the distribution of ill-defined causes of death. However, the differences between educational groups were small suggesting that socioeconomic inequalities in cause-specific mortality in Europe are not likely to be biased.
Subject: Mortality
Education
Ill-defined causes of death
Data quality
Europe
EDUCATIONAL INEQUALITIES
MORTALITY
HEALTH
MISCLASSIFICATION
POPULATIONS
STATISTICS
LITHUANIA
AUTOPSY
DISEASE
WOMEN
5141 Sociology
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