Population Characteristics May Reduce the Levels of Individual Call Identity

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Delgado , M D M , Caferri , E , Mendez , M , Godoy , J A , Campioni , L & Penteriani , V 2013 , ' Population Characteristics May Reduce the Levels of Individual Call Identity ' , PLoS One , vol. 8 , no. 10 . https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0077557

Title: Population Characteristics May Reduce the Levels of Individual Call Identity
Author: Delgado, Maria del Mar; Caferri, Eleonora; Mendez, Maria; Godoy, Jose A.; Campioni, Letizia; Penteriani, Vincenzo
Contributor organization: Finnish Museum of Natural History
Zoology
Biosciences
Centre of Excellence in Metapopulation Research
Otso Ovaskainen / Principal Investigator
Ecology and Evolutionary Biology
Date: 2013-10-29
Language: eng
Number of pages: 8
Belongs to series: PLoS One
ISSN: 1932-6203
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0077557
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/10138/164351
Abstract: Individual variability influences the demographic and evolutionary dynamics of spatially structured populations, and conversely ecological and evolutionary dynamics provide the context under which variations at the individual level occur. Therefore, it is essential to identify and characterize the importance of the different factors that may promote or hinder individual variability. Animal signaling is a prime example of a type of behavior that is largely dependent on both the features of individuals and the characteristics of the population to which they belong. After 10 years studying the dynamics of a population of a long-lived species, the eagle owl (Bubo bubo), we investigated the emergence and maintenance of traits that reveal individual identity by focusing on vocal features. We found that individuals inhabiting a high density population characterized by a relative lack of heterogeneity (in terms of prey availability and breeding success) among breeding sites might be selected for reducing the levels of identity. Two non-mutually exclusive hypotheses may explain the structural call patterns we detected: (1) similarity in calls may be principally a consequence of the particular characteristics of the population; and (2) high density may encourage individuals to mimic each other’s vocalizations in a cascade effect, leading to a widespread and unique communication network.
Subject: OWL-BUBO-BUBO
LIFE-HISTORY TRAITS
EAGLE OWL
PHENOTYPIC PLASTICITY
MICROSATELLITE MARKERS
FRAGMENTED LANDSCAPES
REPRODUCTIVE SUCCESS
BREEDING PERFORMANCE
BOTAURUS-STELLARIS
VOCAL DISPLAYS
1181 Ecology, evolutionary biology
Peer reviewed: Yes
Rights: cc_by
Usage restriction: openAccess
Self-archived version: publishedVersion


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