Dental Calculus Links Statistically to Angina Pectoris : 26-Year Observational Study

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http://hdl.handle.net/10138/164977

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Soder , B , Meurman , J H & Soder , P-O 2016 , ' Dental Calculus Links Statistically to Angina Pectoris : 26-Year Observational Study ' PLoS One , vol. 11 , no. 6 , 0157797 . DOI: 10.1371/journal.pone.0157797

Title: Dental Calculus Links Statistically to Angina Pectoris : 26-Year Observational Study
Author: Soder, Birgitta; Meurman, Jukka H.; Soder, Per-Osten
Contributor: University of Helsinki, Clinicum
Date: 2016-06-23
Language: eng
Number of pages: 8
Belongs to series: PLoS One
ISSN: 1932-6203
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/10138/164977
Abstract: Objectives Dental infections, such as periodontitis, associate with atherosclerosis and its complications. We studied a cohort followed-up since 1985 for incidence of angina pectoris with the hypothesis that calculus accumulation, proxy for poor oral hygiene, links to this symptom. Methods In our Swedish prospective cohort study of 1676 randomly selected subjects followed-up for 26 years. In 1985 all subjects underwent clinical oral examination and answered a questionnaire assessing background variables such as socio-economic status and pack-years of smoking. By using data from the Center of Epidemiology, Swedish National Board of Health and Welfare, Sweden we analyzed the association of oral health parameters with the prevalence of in-hospital verified angina pectoris classified according to the WHO International Classification of Diseases, using descriptive statistics and logistic regression analysis. Results Of the 1676 subjects, 51 (28 women/23 men) had been diagnosed with angina pectoris at a mean age of 59.8 +/- 2.9 years. No difference was observed in age and gender between patients with angina pectoris and subjects without. Neither was there any difference in education level and smoking habits (in pack years), Gingival index and Plaque index between the groups. Angina pectoris patients had significantly more often their first maxillary molar tooth extracted (d. 16) than the other subjects (p = 0.02). Patients also showed significantly higher dental calculus index values than the subjects without angina pectoris (p = 0.01). Multiple regression analysis showed odds ratio 2.21 (95% confidence interval 1.17-4.17) in the association between high calculus index and angina pectoris (p = 0.015). Conclusion Our study hypothesis was confirmed by showing for the first time that high dental calculus score indeed associated with the incidence of angina pectoris in this cohort study.
Subject: CORONARY-HEART-DISEASE
ORAL-HEALTH
CARDIOVASCULAR-DISEASE
PORPHYROMONAS-GINGIVALIS
PERIODONTAL-DISEASES
PREVENTION
ASSOCIATION
ATHEROSCLEROSIS
SUPRAGINGIVAL
INFECTION
313 Dentistry
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