Advanced Autumn Migration of Sparrowhawk Has Increased the Predation Risk of Long-Distance Migrants in Finland

Show full item record



Permalink

http://hdl.handle.net/10138/165659

Citation

Lehikoinen , A 2011 , ' Advanced Autumn Migration of Sparrowhawk Has Increased the Predation Risk of Long-Distance Migrants in Finland ' , PLoS One , vol. 6 , no. 5 . https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0020001

Title: Advanced Autumn Migration of Sparrowhawk Has Increased the Predation Risk of Long-Distance Migrants in Finland
Author: Lehikoinen, Aleksi
Contributor: University of Helsinki, Finnish Museum of Natural History
Date: 2011-05-18
Language: eng
Number of pages: 4
Belongs to series: PLoS One
ISSN: 1932-6203
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/10138/165659
Abstract: Predation affects life history traits of nearly all organisms and the population consequences of predator avoidance are often larger than predation itself. Climate change has been shown to cause phenological changes. These changes are not necessarily similar between species and may cause mismatches between prey and predator. Eurasian sparrowhawk Accipiter nisus, the main predator of passerines, has advanced its autumn phenology by about ten days in 30 years due to climate change. However, we do not know if sparrowhawk migrate earlier in response to earlier migration by its prey or if earlier sparrowhawk migration results in changes to predation risk on its prey. By using the median departure date of 41 passerine species I was able to show that early migrating passerines tend to advance, and late migrating species delay their departure, but none of the species have advanced their departure times as much as the sparrowhawk. This has lead to a situation of increased predation risk on early migrating long-distance migrants (LDM) and decreased the overlap of migration season with later departing short-distance migrants (SDM). Findings highlight the growing list of problems of declining LDM populations caused by climate change. On the other hand it seems that the autumn migration may become safer for SDM whose populations are growing. Results demonstrate that passerines show very conservative response in autumn phenology to climate change, and thus phenological mismatches caused by global warming are not necessarily increasing towards the higher trophic levels.
Subject: AFRO-PALEARCTIC MIGRANT
GLOBAL CLIMATE-CHANGE
PHENOLOGICAL CHANGES
POPULATION DECLINES
HABITAT SELECTION
ACCIPITER-NISUS
SPRING ARRIVAL
BIRDS DEPENDS
PREY
SHIFTS
1181 Ecology, evolutionary biology
1182 Biochemistry, cell and molecular biology
1183 Plant biology, microbiology, virology
1184 Genetics, developmental biology, physiology
Rights:


Files in this item

Total number of downloads: Loading...

Files Size Format View
journal.pone.0020001.PDF 134.8Kb PDF View/Open

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show full item record