The Breeding Ranges of Central European and Arctic Bird Species Move Poleward

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dc.contributor University of Helsinki, Biosciences en
dc.contributor University of Helsinki, Finnish Museum of Natural History en
dc.contributor University of Helsinki, Finnish Museum of Natural History en
dc.contributor.author Brommer, Jon
dc.contributor.author Lehikoinen, Aleksi
dc.contributor.author Valkama, Jari
dc.date.accessioned 2016-08-16T10:44:01Z
dc.date.available 2016-08-16T10:44:01Z
dc.date.issued 2012-09-20
dc.identifier.citation Brommer , J , Lehikoinen , A & Valkama , J 2012 , ' The Breeding Ranges of Central European and Arctic Bird Species Move Poleward ' , PLoS One , vol. 7 , no. 9 . https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0043648 en
dc.identifier.issn 1932-6203
dc.identifier.other PURE: 25915173
dc.identifier.other PURE UUID: 4960ad44-5d09-42c3-82d7-4e241f77c1e2
dc.identifier.other WOS: 000309388900004
dc.identifier.other Scopus: 84866696987
dc.identifier.other ORCID: /0000-0002-1989-277X/work/42687560
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/10138/165845
dc.description.abstract Background Climatic warming predicts that species move their entire distribution poleward. Poleward movement of the ‘cold’ side of the distribution of species is empirically supported, but evidence of poleward movement at the ‘warm’ distributional side is relatively scarce. Methodology/Principal Finding Finland has, as the first country in the world, completed three national atlas surveys of breeding birds, which we here use to calculate the sizes and weighted mean latitudes of the national range of 114 southern and 34 northern bird species during three periods (1974–1979; 1986–1989; 2006–2010), each denoting species presence in approximately 3 800 10×10 km2 squares. We find strong evidence that southern species (breeding predominantly in central Europe) showed a latitudinal shift of 1.1–1.3 km/year poleward during all three pairwise comparisons between these atlases (covering 11, 20.5 and 31.5 years respectively). We find evidence of a latitudinal shift of 0.7–0.8 km/year poleward of northern boreal and Arctic species, but this shift was not found in all study periods and may have been influenced by increased effort put into the more recent surveys. Species showed no significant correlation in changes in range size and weighted mean latitude between the first (11 year) and second (20.5 year) period covered by consecutive atlases, suggesting weak phylogenetic signal and little scope of species characteristics in explaining latitudinal avian range changes. Conclusions Extinction-driven avian range changes (at the ‘warm’ side) of a species' distribution occur at approximately half the rate of colonisation-driven range changes (at the ‘cold’ side), and its quantification therefore requires long-term monitoring data, possibly explaining why evidence for such changes is currently rare. A clear latitudinal shift in an assemblage of species may still harbour considerable temporal inconsistency in latitudinal movement on the species level. Understanding this inconsistency is important for predictive modelling of species composition in a changing world. en
dc.format.extent 7
dc.language.iso eng
dc.relation.ispartof PLoS One
dc.rights en
dc.subject BOREAL PROTECTED AREAS en
dc.subject CLIMATE-CHANGE en
dc.subject NORTHERN BIRDS en
dc.subject SHIFTS en
dc.subject VARIABILITY en
dc.subject BOUNDARIES en
dc.subject RESPONSES en
dc.subject 1181 Ecology, evolutionary biology en
dc.title The Breeding Ranges of Central European and Arctic Bird Species Move Poleward en
dc.type Article
dc.description.version Peer reviewed
dc.identifier.doi https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0043648
dc.type.uri info:eu-repo/semantics/other
dc.type.uri info:eu-repo/semantics/publishedVersion
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