Modulation of the similar to 20-Hz motor-cortex rhythm to passive movement and tactile stimulation

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Parkkonen , E , Laaksonen , K , Piitulainen , H , Parkkonen , L & Forss , N 2015 , ' Modulation of the similar to 20-Hz motor-cortex rhythm to passive movement and tactile stimulation ' , Brain and Behavior , vol. 5 , no. 5 , 00328 . https://doi.org/10.1002/brb3.328

Title: Modulation of the similar to 20-Hz motor-cortex rhythm to passive movement and tactile stimulation
Author: Parkkonen, Eeva; Laaksonen, Kristina; Piitulainen, Harri; Parkkonen, Lauri; Forss, Nina
Other contributor: University of Helsinki, Neurologian yksikkö
University of Helsinki, Neurologian yksikkö
University of Helsinki, Neurologian yksikkö


Date: 2015-05
Language: eng
Number of pages: 11
Belongs to series: Brain and Behavior
ISSN: 2162-3279
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1002/brb3.328
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/10138/166370
Abstract: Background: Integration of afferent somatosensory input with motor-cortex output is essential for accurate movements. Prior studies have shown that tactile input modulates motor-cortex excitability, which is reflected in the reactivity of the similar to 20-Hz motor-cortex rhythm. similar to 20-Hz rebound is connected to inhibition or deactivation of motor cortex whereas suppression has been associated with increased motor cortex activity. Although tactile sense carries important information for controlling voluntary actions, proprioception likely provides the most essential feedback for motor control. Methods: To clarify how passive movement modulates motor-cortex excitability, we studied with magnetoencephalography (MEG) the amplitudes and peak latencies of suppression and rebound of the similar to 20-Hz rhythm elicited by tactile stimulation and passive movement of right and left index fingers in 22 healthy volunteers. Results: Passive movement elicited a stronger and more robust similar to 20-Hz rebound than tactile stimulation. In contrast, the suppression amplitudes did not differ between the two stimulus types. Conclusion: Our findings suggest that suppression and rebound represent activity of two functionally distinct neuronal populations. The similar to 20-Hz rebound to passive movement could be a suitable tool to study the functional state of the motor cortex both in healthy subjects and in patients with motor disorders.
Subject: Beta rebound
beta rhythm
magnetoencephalography
motor-cortex excitability
proprioception
sensorimotor integration
EVENT-RELATED DESYNCHRONIZATION
SIGNAL SPACE SEPARATION
TRANSCRANIAL MAGNETIC STIMULATION
PROGRESSIVE MYOCLONUS EPILEPSY
2ND SOMATOSENSORY CORTEX
UNVERRICHT-LUNDBORG TYPE
PACED FINGER MOVEMENTS
CENTRAL BETA-RHYTHMS
CORTICAL RHYTHMS
ELECTROPHYSIOLOGICAL CORRELATE
3124 Neurology and psychiatry
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