Prehospital Phase of the Stroke Chain of Survival : A Prospective Observational Study

Show full item record



Permalink

http://hdl.handle.net/10138/169581

Citation

Puolakka , T , Strbian , D , Harve , H , Kuisma , M & Lindsberg , P J 2016 , ' Prehospital Phase of the Stroke Chain of Survival : A Prospective Observational Study ' , Journal of the American Heart Association , vol. 5 , no. 5 , 002808 . https://doi.org/10.1161/JAHA.115.002808

Title: Prehospital Phase of the Stroke Chain of Survival : A Prospective Observational Study
Author: Puolakka, Tuukka; Strbian, Daniel; Harve, Heini; Kuisma, Markku; Lindsberg, Perttu J.
Contributor: University of Helsinki, Neurologian yksikkö
University of Helsinki, Anestesiologian yksikkö
University of Helsinki, Clinicum
University of Helsinki, Clinicum
Date: 2016-05
Language: eng
Number of pages: 8
Belongs to series: Journal of the American Heart Association
ISSN: 2047-9980
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/10138/169581
Abstract: Background-Few studies have discussed the emergency call and prehospital care as a continuous process to decrease the prehospital and in-hospital delays for acute stroke. To identify features associated with early hospital arrival ( Methods and Results-This was a 2-year prospective observational study. All stroke patients who were transported to the hospital by emergency medical services and received recanalization therapy were recruited for the study. For a sample of 308 patients, the stroke code was activated in 206 (67%) and high priority was used in 258 (84%) of the emergency calls. Emergency medical services transported 285 (93%) of the patients using the stroke code and 269 (87%) using high priority. In the univariate analysis, the most dominant predictors of early hospital arrival were transport using stroke code (P= 0.001) and high priority (P= 0.002) and onset-to-call (P<0.0001) and on-scene times (P= 0.052). In the regression analysis, the influences of high-priority transport (P<0.01) and onset-to-call time (P<0.001) prevailed as significant in both dichotomies of early arrival and treatment. The on-scene time was found to be surprisingly long (> 23.5 minutes) for both early and late-arriving patients. Conclusions-Fast emergency medical services activation and ambulance transport promoted early hospital arrival and treatment. Although patient-dependent delays still dominate the prehospital process, it should be ensured that the minutes on the scene are well spent.
Subject: emergency medical services
stroke
time factors
GOLDEN HOUR
EMERGENCY
AMBULANCE
THROMBOLYSIS
DELAYS
IDENTIFICATION
VALIDATION
DIAGNOSIS
ACCURACY
MINUTES
3121 General medicine, internal medicine and other clinical medicine
3112 Neurosciences
3124 Neurology and psychiatry
Rights:


Files in this item

Total number of downloads: Loading...

Files Size Format View
e002808.full.pdf 792.9Kb PDF View/Open

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show full item record