Ocean acidification challenges copepod phenotypic plasticity

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Vehmaa , A , Almén , A-K , Brutemark , A , Paul , A , Riebesell , U , Furuhagen , S & Engstrom-Ost , J 2016 , ' Ocean acidification challenges copepod phenotypic plasticity ' , Biogeosciences , vol. 13 , no. 22 , pp. 6171-6182 . https://doi.org/10.5194/bg-13-6171-2016

Title: Ocean acidification challenges copepod phenotypic plasticity
Author: Vehmaa, Anu; Almén, Anna-Karin; Brutemark, Andreas; Paul, Allanah; Riebesell, Ulf; Furuhagen, Sara; Engstrom-Ost, Jonna
Contributor organization: Tvärminne Zoological Station
Behavioural Ecology - Candolin Research Lab
Date: 2016-11-15
Language: eng
Number of pages: 12
Belongs to series: Biogeosciences
ISSN: 1726-4170
DOI: https://doi.org/10.5194/bg-13-6171-2016
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/10138/170377
Abstract: Ocean acidification is challenging phenotypic plasticity of individuals and populations. Calanoid copepods (zooplankton) are shown to be fairly plastic against altered pH conditions, and laboratory studies indicate that transgenerational effects are one mechanism behind this plasticity. We studied phenotypic plasticity of the copepod Acartia sp. in the course of a pelagic, large-volume mesocosm study that was conducted to investigate ecosystem and biogeochemical responses to ocean acidification. We measured copepod egg production rate, egg-hatching success, adult female size and adult female antioxidant capacity (ORAC) as a function of acidification (fCO(2) similar to 365-1231 mu atm) and as a function of quantity and quality of their diet. We used an egg transplant experiment to reveal whether transgenerational effects can alleviate the possible negative effects of ocean acidification on offspring development. We found significant negative effects of ocean acidification on adult female size. In addition, we found signs of a possible threshold at high fCO(2), above which adaptive maternal effects cannot alleviate the negative effects of acidification on egg-hatching and nauplii development. We did not find support for the hypothesis that insufficient food quantity (total particulate carbon
Subject: CLIMATE-CHANGE
BALTIC SEA
CO2-INDUCED ACIDIFICATION
CALANUS-FINMARCHICUS
REPRODUCTIVE SUCCESS
DEVELOPMENTAL-STAGES
PLANKTONIC COPEPOD
FOOD CONCENTRATION
ACARTIA-BIFILOSA
MARINE COPEPOD
1172 Environmental sciences
Peer reviewed: Yes
Rights: cc_by
Usage restriction: openAccess
Self-archived version: publishedVersion


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