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  • Ahonen, Pertti Pellervo (ResearchGate, 2015)
    The purpose of this article is an examination informed by neo-institutional political and related research on two foremost aspects of institutionalization, performance and legitimation. Political research published by scholars of the extended Baltic region by late May r 2013 comprises the study topic. The article considers political research in four selected subfields: general political science, international relations/world politics, public policy, and public administration/public management. The results indicate that Denmark and Norway are “great powers” in the region, with a strong presence in strongly legitimate publication arenas of political research. Looking further at the performance suggested by publications and citations to these, Sweden and Finland stand out no less than Denmark and Norway, and Estonia and Lithuania also receive visibility. Examining performance with the bibliometric “h” index suggests that “size matters”, which accentuates German achievements, although Norway, Denmark and Sweden continue to stand out despite their relatively small population size.
  • Kaasalainen, Ulla; Heinrichs, Jochen; Krings, Michael; Myllys, Leena; Grabenhorst, Heinrich; Rikkinen, Jouko; Schmidt, Alexander R. (Public Library of Science, 2015)
    One of the most important issues in molecular dating studies concerns the incorporation of reliable fossil taxa into the phylogenies reconstructed from DNA sequence variation in extant taxa. Lichens are symbiotic associations between fungi and algae and/or cyanobacteria. Several lichen fossils have been used as minimum age constraints in recent studies concerning the diversification of the Ascomycota. Recent evolutionary studies of Lecanoromycetes, an almost exclusively lichen-forming class in the Ascomycota, have utilized the Eocene amber inclusion Alectoria succinic as a minimum age constraint. However, a re-investigation of the type material revealed that this inclusion in fact represents poorly preserved plant remains, most probably of a root. Consequently, this fossil cannot be used as evidence of the presence of the genus Alectoria (Parmeliaceae, Lecanorales) or any other lichens in the Paleogene. However, newly discovered inclusions from Paleogene Baltic and Bitterfeld amber verify that alectorioid morphologies in lichens were in existence by the Paleogene. The new fossils represent either a lineage within the alectorioid group or belong to the genus Oropogon.
  • Lönnqvist, Jan-Erik; Hennig-Schmidt, Heike; Walkowitz, Gari (Public Library of Science, 2015)
  • Siljander, Pia Riitta-Maria; Yáñez-Mó, Maria (Co-Action Publishing, 2015)
    In the past decade, extracellular vesicles (EVs) have been recognized as potent vehicles of intercellular communication, both in prokaryotes and eukaryotes. This is due to their capacity to transfer proteins, lipids and nucleic acids, thereby influencing various physiological and pathological functions of both recipient and parent cells.While intensive investigation has targeted the role of EVs in different pathological processes, for example, in cancer and autoimmune diseases, the EV-mediated maintenance of homeostasis and the regulation of physiological functions have remained less explored. Here, we provide a comprehensive overview of the current understanding of the physiological roles of EVs, which has been written by crowd-sourcing, drawing on the unique EV expertise of academia-based scientists, clinicians and industry based in 27 European countries, the United States and Australia. This review is intended to be of relevance to both researchers already working on EV biology and to newcomers who will encounter this universal cell biological system. Therefore, here we address the molecular contents and functions of EVs in various tissues and body fluids from cell systems to organs. We also review the physiological mechanisms of EVs in bacteria, lower eukaryotes and plants to highlight the functional uniformity of this emerging communication system.
  • Prozorov, Sergei (BRILL, 2015)
    The article addresses the attempts of contemporary continental philosophy to develop a politics that would move beyond the Hobbesian logic of the constitution of political community. In their readings of Hobbes, Roberto Esposito and Giorgio Agamben emphasize the nihilistic character of Hobbes’s approach to community. For Esposito, Hobbes’s commonwealth is legitimized by a prior negation of the originary human community in the construction of the state of nature as the state of war. Yet, as Agamben shows, this negative state of nature is never fully transcended by the commonwealth, which persistently reproduces it in the state of exception. These critiques emphasize the complex relation between nature and artifice in Hobbes’s thought, which have profound implications for the attempts to arrive at a ‘post-Hobbesian’ mode of political community. Neither a facile search for a truer, more fundamental state of nature nor an affirmation of artifice and denaturation as constitutive of human community are sufficient to evade the Hobbesian constellation. A genuine move beyond Hobbes would rather consist in thoroughly deactivating the very relation between nature and artifice whereby they become indistinct and no longer negate each other.
  • Lukkarinen, Jani; Mei, Peng; Spohn, Herbert (JOHN/WILEY & SONS, INC., 2015)
    The Hubbard model is a simplified description for the evolution of interacting spin-1/2 fermions on a d-dimensional lattice. In a kinetic scaling limit, the Hubbard model can be associated with a matrix-valued Boltzmann equation, the Hubbard-Boltzmann equation. Its collision operator is a sum of two qualitatively different terms: The first term is similar to the collision operator of the fermionic Boltzmann-Nordheim equation. The second term leads to a momentum-dependent rotation of the spin basis. The rotation is determined by a principal value integral which depends quadratically on the state of the system and might become singular for non-smooth states. In this paper, we prove that the spatially homogeneous equation nevertheless has global solutions in L^\infty(T^d,C^{2x2}) for any initial data W_0 which satisfies the "Fermi constraint" in the sense that 0 = 3. These assumptions suffice to guarantee that, although possibly singular, the local rotation term is generated by a function in L^2(T^d,C^{2x2}).
  • Okuyama, Yûsuke; Pankka, Pekka (American Mathematical Society, 2015)
    We establish a rescaling theorem for isolated essential singularities of quasiregular mappings. As a consequence we show that the class of closed manifolds receiving a quasiregular mapping from a punctured unit ball with an essential singularity at the origin is exactly the class of closed quasiregularly elliptic manifolds, that is, closed manifolds receiving a non-constant quasiregular mapping from a Euclidean space.
  • Sennikov, Alexander Nikolaevich (INTERNATIONAL ASSOCIATION FOR PLANT TAXONOMY, 2015)
  • Katajisto, Pekka; Doehla, Julia; Chaffer, Christine L.; Pentinmikko, Nalle; Marjanovic, Nemanja; Iqbal, Md Sharif; Zoncu, Roberto; Chen, Walter; Weinberg, Robert A.; Sabatini, David M. (AAAS, American Association for the Advancement of Science, 2015)
    By dividing asymmetrically, stem cells can generate two daughter cells with distinct fates. However, evidence is limited in mammalian systems for the selective apportioning of subcellular contents between daughters. We followed the fates of old and young organelles during the division of human mammary stemlike cells and found that such cells apportion aged mitochondria asymmetrically between daughter cells. Daughter cells that received fewer old mitochondria maintained stem cell traits. Inhibition of mitochondrial fission disrupted both the age-dependent subcellular localization and segregation of mitochondria and caused loss of stem cell properties in the progeny cells. Hence, mechanisms exist for mammalian stemlike cells to asymmetrically sort aged and young mitochondria, and these are important for maintaining stemness properties.
  • Gel'man, Vladimir (Russian Analytical Digest, 2015)
  • Ajao, Charmaine; Andersson, Maria; Teplova, Vera V; Nagy, Szabolcs; Gahmberg, Carl G.; Andersson, Leif C.; Hautaniemi, Maria; Kakasi, Balazs; Roivainen, Merja; Salkinoja-Salonen, Mirja Sinikka (Elsevier, 2015)
    Effects of triclosan (5-chloro-2’-(2,4-dichlorophenoxy)phenol) on mammalian cells were investigated using human peripheral blood mono nuclear cells (PBMC), keratinocytes (HaCaT), porcine spermatozoa and kidney tubular epithelial cells (PK-15), murine pancreatic islets (MIN-6) and neuroblastoma cells (MNA) as targets. We show that triclosan (1 – 10 μg ml-1) depolarised the mitochondria, upshifted the rate of glucose consumption in PMBC, HaCaT, PK-15 and MNA, and subsequently induced metabolic acidosis. Triclosan induced a regression of insulin producing pancreatic islets into tiny pycnotic cells and necrotic death. Short exposure to low concentrations of triclosan (30 min, ≤ 1 μg / ml) paralysed the high amplitude tail beating and progressive motility of spermatozoa, within 30 min exposure, depolarized the spermatozoan mitochondria and hyperpolarised the acrosome region of the sperm head and the flagellar fibrous sheath (distal part of the flagellum). Experiments with isolated rat liver mitochondria showed that triclosan impaired oxidative phosphorylation, downshifted ATP synthesis, uncoupled respiration and provoked excessive oxygen uptake. These exposure concentrations are 100 - 1000 fold lower that those permitted in consumer goods. The mitochondriotoxic mechanism of triclosan differs from that of valinomycin, cereulide and the enniatins by not involving potassium ionophoric activity.
  • Lehtisaari, Katja (SUOMEN VENÄJÄN JA ITÄ-EUROOPAN TUTKIMUKSEN SEURA., 2015)
    Idäntutkimus-lehden 1/2015 pääkirjoitus
  • Montovan, Kathryn J.; Couchoux, Christelle; Jones, Laura E.; Reeve, Hudson K.; van Nouhuys, Saskya (UNIVERSITY OF CHICAGO PRESS, 2015)
    When there is conspicuous underexploitation of a limited resource, it is worth asking, what mechanisms allow presumably valuable resources to be left unused? Evolutionary biologists have generated a wide variety of hypotheses to explain this, ranging from interdemic group selection to selfishly prudent individual restraint. We consider a situation in which, despite high intraspecific competition, individuals leave most of a key resource unexploited. The parasitic wasp that does this finds virtually all host egg clusters in a landscape but parasitizes only about a third of the eggs in each and then leaves a deterrent mark around the cluster. We first test—and reject—a series of system-specific simple constraints that might limit full host exploitation, such as asynchronous maturation of host eggs. We then consider classical hypotheses for the evolution of restraint. Prudent predation and bet-hedging fail as explanations because the wasp lives as a large, well-mixed population. Additionally, we find no individual benefits to the parasitoid of developing in a sparsely parasitized host nest.However, an optimal foragingmodel, including empirically measured costs of superparasitism and hyperparasitism, can explain through individual selection both the consistently low rate of parasitism and deterrent marking.
  • Kahanpää, Jere; Zatwarnicki, Tadeusz (Pensoft Publishers, 2015)
    The recent checklist of the Ephydridae of Finland by Zatwarnicki and Kahanpää (2014) mentioned 13 ephydrid species as new for Finland without further details. This paper presents detailed records for those species and a few other species of interest. Four species are recorded for the first time from Russia. junior synonym of Trimerina microchaeta Trimerina in distincta Krivosheina, 2004 is herein considered as a new Hendel, 1932, syn. nov.
  • Tiittula, Liisa (KAINUUN SANOMAT, 2015)
  • Mustajoki, Arto Samuel; Teeri, Tuula (Elinkeinoelämän valtuuskunta, 2015)
  • Weinheimer, Isabel; Jiu, Yaming; Rajamäki, Minna; Matilainen, Olli; Kallijärvi, Jukka; Cuellar, Wilmer; Lu, Rui; Saarma, Mart; Holmberg, Carina I; Jäntti, Jussi; Valkonen, Jari (PUBLIC LIBRARY OF SCIENCE., 2015)
    Certain RNA and DNA viruses that infect plants, insects, fish or poikilothermic animals encode Class 1 RNaseIII endoribonuclease-like proteins. dsRNA-specific endoribonuclease activity of the RNaseIII of rock bream iridovirus infecting fish and Sweet potato chlorotic stunt crinivirus (SPCSV) infecting plants has been shown. Suppression of the host antiviral RNA interference (RNAi) pathway has been documented with the RNaseIII of SPCSV and Heliothis virescens ascovirus infecting insects. Suppression of RNAi by the viral RNaseIIIs in non-host organisms of different kingdoms is not known. Here we expressed PPR3, the RNaseIII of Pike-perch iridovirus, in the non-hosts Nicotiana benthamiana (plant) and Caenorhabditis elegans (nematode) and found that it cleaves double-stranded small interfering RNA (ds-siRNA) molecules that are pivotal in the host RNA interference (RNAi) pathway and thereby suppresses RNAi in non-host tissues. In N. benthamiana, PPR3 enhanced accumulation of Tobacco rattle tobravirus RNA1 replicon lacking the 16K RNAi suppressor. Furthermore, PPR3 suppressed single-stranded RNA (ssRNA)–mediated RNAi and rescued replication of Flock House virus RNA1 replicon lacking the B2 RNAi suppressor in C. elegans. Suppression of RNAi was debilitated with the catalytically compromised mutant PPR3-Ala. However, the RNaseIII (CSR3) produced by SPCSV, which cleaves ds-siRNA and counteracts antiviral RNAi in plants, failed to suppress ssRNA-mediated RNAi in C. elegans. In leaves of N. benthamiana, PPR3 suppressed RNAi induced by ssRNA and dsRNA and reversed silencing; CSR3, however, suppressed only RNAi induced by ssRNA and was unable to reverse silencing. Neither PPR3 nor CSR3 suppressed antisense-mediated RNAi in Drosophila melanogaster. These results show that the RNaseIII enzymes of RNA and DNA viruses suppress RNAi, which requires catalytic activities of RNaseIII. In contrast to other viral silencing suppression proteins, the RNaseIII enzymes are homologous in unrelated RNA and DNA viruses and can be detected in viral genomes using gene modeling and protein structure prediction programs.
  • Jaakko, Pohjoismäki; Antti, Haarto; Kaj, Winqvist; Kahanpää, Jere (Research Branch, Agriculture Canada, 2015)
  • Spirin, Viacheslav; Ryvarden, Leif; Miettinen, Otto (Fungiflora, 2015)
    In total, 7 species of heterobasidiomycetes are reported for the first time from St. Helena. A new genus Dendrogloeon (Auricularilaes) is introduced for the new species D. helenae based on both DNA and morphological data. Saccoblastia media, sp. nova, is the sole representative of the Pucciniomycotina, so far found in the study area.