Ecological and genetic basis of metapopulation persistence of the Glanville fritillary butterfly in fragmented landscapes

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http://hdl.handle.net/10138/177567

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Hanski , I , Schulz , T , Wong , S C , Ahola , V , Ruokolainen , A & Ojanen , S P 2017 , ' Ecological and genetic basis of metapopulation persistence of the Glanville fritillary butterfly in fragmented landscapes ' , Nature Communications , vol. 8 , 14504 . https://doi.org/10.1038/ncomms14504

Title: Ecological and genetic basis of metapopulation persistence of the Glanville fritillary butterfly in fragmented landscapes
Author: Hanski, Ilkka; Schulz, Torsti; Wong, Swee Chong; Ahola, Virpi; Ruokolainen, Annukka; Ojanen, Sami P.
Contributor: University of Helsinki, Biosciences
University of Helsinki, Biosciences
University of Helsinki, Biosciences
University of Helsinki, Biosciences
University of Helsinki, Biosciences
Date: 2017-02-17
Language: eng
Number of pages: 11
Belongs to series: Nature Communications
ISSN: 2041-1723
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/10138/177567
Abstract: Ecologists are challenged to construct models of the biological consequences of habitat loss and fragmentation. Here, we use a metapopulation model to predict the distribution of the Glanville fritillary butterfly during 22 years across a large heterogeneous landscape with 4,415 small dry meadows. The majority (74%) of the 125 networks into which the meadows were clustered are below the extinction threshold for long-term persistence. Among the 33 networks above the threshold, spatial configuration and habitat quality rather than the pooled habitat area predict metapopulation size and persistence, but additionally allelic variation in a SNP in the gene Phosphoglucose isomerase (Pgi) explains 30% of variation in metapopulation size. The Pgi genotypes are associated with dispersal rate and hence with colonizations and extinctions. Associations between Pgi genotypes, population turnover and metapopulation size reflect eco-evolutionary dynamics, which may be a common feature in species inhabiting patch networks with unstable local dynamics.
Subject: HABITAT FRAGMENTATION
MELITAEA-CINXIA
AREA RELATIONSHIPS
LARVAL DEVELOPMENT
FLIGHT METABOLISM
ATLANTIC FOREST
DISPERSAL RATE
DYNAMICS
EXTINCTIONS
EVOLUTION
1181 Ecology, evolutionary biology
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