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  • Killian, Don (Helsingin yliopisto, 2015)
    This dissertation investigates the grammar and phonology of Uduk, a language belonging to the Koman branch of the Nilo-Saharan language family. Uduk is spoken by approximately 20 to 25,000 speakers, whose community homeland was in the southern part of the former Blue Nile Province of Sudan. Due to continuing war conditions since the late 1980s, the majority are now living scattered in the international diaspora, as well as in refugee camps in Ethiopia and South Sudan. The description provides an analysis of the phonology, morphology, and syntax based on thirteen months of fieldwork between 2011 and 2014. Included in the grammatical description are sixteen glossed texts, to help illustrate the grammar in context. Most major aspects of the language are described and analyzed in detail. This includes the segmental and suprasegmental phonology, nouns and noun phrases, pronouns and agreement marking, nominal and verbal modifiers, verbs and verb phrases, major clause types, and clause linking. Uduk has a rich phonology; the main dialect of Uduk has 55 contrastive consonant phonemes, 21 of which occur as a result of the secondary feature labialization. There are three contrastive tone levels in Uduk, and seven possible register/contour melodies on a single TBU. There is also a complex interaction between consonants and tone which has given rise to a depressor consonant effect. This is one of the first Nilo-Saharan languages known to have such. Argument structure and morphosyntax are equally interesting. Uduk has morphologically marked cases for both Accusative as well as Ergative, depending on the constituent order. Uduk nouns exhibit grammatical gender, the assignment of which has nearly no semantic correlations, even minimal ones relating to animacy or biological sex. Uduk verb forms use polysemous grammatical suffixes which mark either the location of an action or its internal aspect, and spatial deixis and aspect are heavily intertwined. Spatial orientation and location thus form a fundamental part of basic verbal inflectional categories. In addition to morphological marking on the basic verb root, many verbs additionally carry discontinuous incorporated nouns called Partarguments. Partarguments are typically body parts, and may function either to classify an argument or then to change the basic meaning of the verb. These as well as other linguistic features make this description a valuable resource for Nilo-Saharan linguists as well as those interested in the typology of African languages.
  • Visakko, Tomi (Helsingin yliopisto, 2015)
    The study examines the mediation and evaluation of personhood in light of Finnish online dating advertisements. The main focus is on the performance and interpretation of what has been called self-promotion, or the idealization of the self in relation to others. The study operates with concepts originating from discourse studies and anthropology under the overarching framework of pragmatism-based semiotic anthropology. The online dating advertisement genre is approached as a cultural instrument of personhood and intersubjective interaction in which writers step into a controlled performance of a promotional persona in order to instigate social relations (only) with desirable and ideal others. The primary data consists of 111 Finnish-language online dating advertisements collected from two online dating services in 2007. In addition, a questionnaire was held for a group of university students to elicit examples of actual interpretations. A third set of data consists of cultural metadiscourses that reflect on online dating advertisements as a type of interaction (online dating guidebooks, Internet discussions and articles, a segment of a TV program). Such backstage discourses illuminate the kinds of reflexive metapractices and interpretive assumptions that do not usually come up explicitly in actual advertisement-based interactions. The study shows that stereotypic cultural understandings of self-promotion often focus on specific kinds of evaluative stances and their reliability or appropriateness, whereas many actually occurring phenomena are entirely overlooked. Such biased stereotypes may be one reason for the fact that evaluative stancetaking seems to be an expected but often problematic act in online dating advertisements. The study also illuminates the non-narrative organization of personhood, selfhood, and biography, as taxonomic and hierarchical structures of theoretical representations are one of the most salient textual patterns in the data. More generally, the study draws attention to the importance of the indexical patterning of text-artifacts. Textual patterning at all layers, from macrostructures to orthography, becomes interpreted as signs of personhood contributing, for instance, to particular views of subjectivity, a level of meaning often overlooked in studies of online communication. Moreover, the study stresses the importance of reflexive models and ideologies of interaction. For instance, the nature of online dating advertisements as an intersubjective encounter can be understood in almost entirely opposite ways by different interpreters (e.g., as distant versus intimate, or authentic versus inauthentic ).
  • Gustafsson, Sofia (Finska Vetenskaps-Societeten, 2015)
    In 1748, the Swedish Crown began construction of the fortress Sveaborg outside Helsinki. This was an expensive military investment, but where did the money invested actually end up? Traditionally historians have claimed that the burghers of Helsinki benefitted economically from the construction. However, studies of early-modern Western European fortress construction sites show that local communities did not necessarily benefit directly; the money could just as easily have gone to large entrepreneurs from the central areas. The aim of this study is to identify which geographical areas and social groups sold the construction materials needed to build Sveaborg during the first period of construction in 1748-1756. It also discusses the institutional constraints, whether formal or informal, that limited the suppliers actions and choices. The main source material is the accounts of the Fortification Fund in Helsinki. However, to identify the sellers, we combined this material with local civil and private sources. The accounts rarely provided enough information for identification, and the key-question involved determining where to search for local and private sources. Alfred Weber s theory of location of economic activities claims that the optimal location for production depends on labour and transportation costs. The logistics of Sveaborg were water-based, so the search focused on coastal regions either near the fortress or with unique natural resources. With regard to the institutions, we used the theories of Douglass C. North. The laws of the period limited trade to certain groups in the cities, but equally important were the restrictions on suitable conduct for different estates. However, institutions constantly change, and according to Sten Carlsson, the traditional social system in 18th-century Sweden was already in decline. The results suggest that different economic zones specialising in certain products emerged around the fortress. Suppliers benefitting from Sveaborg could be found not only in the city of Helsinki, but also in the surrounding countryside. Other Finnish cities supplying the fortress include Porvoo, Turku and Loviisa. In Sweden, the main areas involved were Stockholm and Gotland. In contrast to the traditional view, one could definitely not claim that the burghers of Helsinki alone profited from the construction. Although formal constraints should have restricted the participation of other social groups, the informal constraints were obviously more permissive. Unlike in Western Europe, where the states tended to use large entrepreneurs from the central areas, the Swedish Crown used small entrepreneurs from the periphery. The money invested in Sveaborg was spread over large areas and many hands, including peasants, merchants, and noblemen.
  • Rauhala, Ilona (Helsingin yliopisto, 2015)
    The dissertation consists of five articles, as well as an introductory chapter that explains the background of the study and also draws together the main results of the articles. The study concentrates on the adjectives in the Uralic languages and aims to present the features of the Uralic adjective category in a historical perspective. The data consists mainly of lexical material collected from various etymological and synchronic dictionaries. In addition, several grammatical features of the adjectives are discussed on the basis of grammatical research. The approach is mainly historical-comparative, but also lexical-semantic and morphosyntactic. All of these frameworks are needed to draw a picture of a common category of adjectives in Uralic, the words it may have included, their paths of semantic change, and the morphosyntactic features the category of adjectives may have had. The results of this study complement the earlier research on adjectives, which has been mainly synchronic. The research conducted suggests that by comparing the categories of adjectives in contemporary Uralic languages and by observing the features of the oldest property concept words in Uralic it is possible to reconstruct an adjective category for Proto-Uralic. The results suggest that the category has included words denoting many central semantic groups that indicate an independent lexical category. The adjectives in the contemporary Uralic languages have common morphosyntactic features that probably date back to the Uralic protolanguage. For instance, the Uralic derivative suffix *-(e)TA has mainly functioned as an adjective marker. The study also reviews critically earlier etymologies presented for some property concept words and suggests some new etymologies.
  • Lehtonen, Heini (Helsingin yliopisto, 2015)
    This thesis examines language use in interaction among adolescents in two junior high schools in Eastern Helsinki. The pupils represent several ethnic backgrounds, and some twenty different first languages are spoken in the schools. The thesis analyses the ways in which the adolescents position themselves and each other with regard to social categories related to ethnicity, gender, and style, focusing on the linguistic resources used in the positioning. The attitudes vis-a-vis linguistic diversity and asymmetry are explored as well. The research questions are as follows: 1) How does a linguistic feature become a social indexical? 2) How do (linguistic) styles get enregistered? 3) How are ownership and foreignness of language negotiated and construed? The thesis participates in the current discussions on ways of conceptualizing multilingualism in the globalization era. Questions of immigration and second language acquisition, learning and teaching are discussed from a sociolinguistic point of view. Theoretically and methodologically, the thesis encompasses the fields of linguistic ethnography, interactional sociolinguistics, and the sociolinguistics of globalization. The data consist of 1) field notes and a field diary, 2) recorded interviews with 37 adolescents, 3) several audio and video recordings of spontaneous interaction during both the lessons and the breaks, and 4) retrospective interviews. The analysis shows the adolescents orientating to the categories of Finns and foreigners , but the meaning of these categorizations is construed in local stylistic practices and does not necessarily resemble to the similar labels used in public discourses. Ethnicity, gender, and enregistered styles (such as hip hop) intertwine in such ways, that the participation in local stylistic practices may guarantee a stronger ownership of linguistic resources than one s ethnic background. All types of linguistic features (phonetic, prosodic, morphological, syntactic, lexical) were found to function as social indexicals. Frequent resources that stand out and establish social relationships between participants are especially likely to develop into social indexicals. As a part of local social practices and in the metapragmatic accounts commenting the practices, linguistic features get associated to specific social personae and their characteristics, and get enregistered to styles. Social indexicals are employed in stylized performances that bring another s voice into the interaction. The stylisations serve as a resource for stance-taking, but also as metapragmatic accounts of the features employed in them. The questions of who knows Finnish or does not know Finnish are negotiated both explicitly and implicitly. One of the implicit means of such negotiations are the stylized bad Finnish performances, where the adolescents carnevalize the stereotypical representations of immigrants or non-native Finns .
  • Koskinen, Inkeri (Helsingin yliopisto, 2015)
    This dissertation examines the effects of a change in the roles that extra-academic agents have in academic research: they are participating in the production of academic knowledge more actively than used to be the case. The focus is mainly on disciplines that fall under the umbrella of cultural research. Former informants are nowadays often becoming collaborators, co-researchers or co-authors in collaborative or participatory projects, or conducting activist research on their own cultures. Cultural research is in a unique position when facing the contemporary urge towards more "democratic" knowledge production. In disciplines such as anthropology, folkloristics and ethnology, researchers have always interacted with their informants' knowledge systems and developed research practices for approaching these systems. These practices are presently colliding with new demands that arise from the now common call for collaborative and participatory research. I focus on normative epistemic questions related to relativistic research practices and to objectivity. When the roles of the extra-academic agents change, the composition of research communities is also changed. An interactive notion of objectivity has recently been defended in social epistemology. It takes a research community as the unit whose objectivity is to be assessed. In the articles I identify shortcomings in the interactive objectivity of the emerging research communities, and develop analytical tools that can hopefully be of use in improving the situation. As the composition of research communities is changed, the established ways of approaching extra-academic knowledge systems also have to change. The moderately relativistic practice of avoiding the appraisal of alien knowledge systems is no longer as practicable as it used to be. When former informants join research teams in participatory projects, or indigenous activists become activist researchers, they become part of communities whose interactive objectivity can and should be assessed. This is the case even if some or all of the members of the communities are taken to represent, or see themselves as representing, extra-academic knowledge systems. The contributions of everyone belonging to a research community must be met with the same critical attitude, or the objectivity of the community will suffer.
  • Liikanen, Elina (Helsingin yliopisto, 2015)
    The role of literature in the construction of cultural memory: three modes of representing the Spanish Civil War and the Franco dictatorship in recent Spanish novels This dissertation focuses on representations of the Spanish Civil War and the Franco dictatorship in Spanish novels written by third-generation authors (born between 1960 and 1975) and published between 1997 and 2008, during the so-called memory boom . I argue that these novels function as media of cultural memory in Spanish memory culture by producing, shaping and disseminating images, versions and interpretations of Spain s violent past. According to Astrid Erll, certain combinations of formal features constitute different modes of representation within the medium of literature, which in turn may elicit different modes of cultural remembering among readers. Based on the narratological analysis of ten novels, I propose in this study that there are three main modes of representing the past in third-generation Spanish novels on the Civil War and the Franco dictatorship. I call these modes the experiential mode, the reconstructive mode and the dissenting mode. The experiential mode represents the past as a lived-through experience. Rather than examining the process of remembering and narrating the past in the present, experiential novels create the illusion of direct access to the past and the protagonists minds so that the reader can share in the subjective experience of the narrated events. In this way, the novels turn the reader into a vicarious witness to the past. The main function of the experiential mode is to promote empathy and understanding towards certain individuals or groups in the past. The reconstructive mode focuses on the process of investigation and reconstruction of past events led by a narrator-character set in the present day. The novels examine the intergenerational transmission of memories and emphasise the meaning of the past as a source of personal and collective identity in the present. Even if the novels represent the past as a subjective reconstruction and often employ metafictional and auto-fictional techniques to explore the limits of art and reality, history and fiction, they still end up presenting one version of the past as the true one. By depicting the narrator-character s search for historical truth and personal and cultural self-understanding, the reconstructive mode tries to convince the reader of the importance of knowing the past in order to understand the present. The dissenting mode does not offer the reader a supposedly true story of the past, but examines instead the role of literature in the production of knowledge about the past. Dissenting novels are highly self-reflexive texts that reject verisimilitude and disrupt the illusion of reality in order to problematize both prevailing practices of representation and dominant interpretation of the past. The dissenting mode encourages readers to adopt a more critical stance towards the representations of the past that circulate in society by revealing how literature affects our understanding of the past through narrative forms and the stories it tells.
  • Hamberg, Leena (Helsingin yliopisto, 2015)
    Abstract This dissertation concerns boundary crossing between three activity systems in a Swedish municipality: a local refugee reception, a Swedish language programme for adult immigrants, and measures for labour market inclusion. In their joint engagement, a boundary activity called The Resource, these systems share a target group consisting of newly arrived refugees at the ages of 20 25. The aim of this study is to explore how boundary crossing between these three systems is constructed by means of language use, and how the newcomers and their language acquisition are constructed in this context of boundary crossing. Moreover, the object of the boundary activity is compared with the original objects of each activity system: integration, language learning andrapid labour market entry. The theoretical framework integrates systemic functional grammar, SFG (Halliday and Matthiessen 2004), with activity theory (Engeström 1999, 2008), completed with the concept of boundary crossing by Wenger (1998). The sources of the study are written documents crossing boundaries, boundary objects, and interviews with boundary crossers, employees representing each of the three activity systems. The findings show that boundary crossing is constructed by lexical means as well as by grammatical means. Efforts are made by the employees to create a way of mentioning the target group that could correspond to the joint engagement in the boundary activity. Simultaneously, the employees mention the newcomers with the traditional terms used in each system (klient, elev,deltagare). When it comes to the grammatical construction of boundary crossing and the target group in written documents, different images emerge. Depending on the genre, the newcomers are constructed as lucky recipients of a chance to enter to the labour market, as matters of administration across boundaries or as active doers successfully engaging in the boundary activity. The participants in the processes often have the function of constructing components of the boundary activity, e.g. the division of labour. Normally, one of the activity systems measures for labour market inclusion is positioned in the foreground. As a frequent participant in the processes and a frequent subject in exchange, this system represents the boundary activity and talks to the newcomers. These conditions are sharpest when it comes to the object of The Resource. The Resource as a boundary activity is clearly oriented to the Swedish employment programme Arbetslinjen . More than rapid labour market entry, some of the boundary crossers emphasize the importance of integration aspects and the empowerment of the target group in awider meaning. Language education and language acquisition become tools in the context of boundary crossing. These tools are taken for granted, and there seems to be no reason to give further details about them.
  • Jalava, Lotta (Helsingin yliopisto, 2015)
    The dissertation consists of four academic articles and an introductory chapter explaining the objectives, background and results of the study. It concentrates on the variation and change in predicate structures in Tundra Nenets, a Samoyedic (Uralic) language spoken in Siberia. The focus of the study is on the finite and non-finite forms and the concept of finiteness in grammatical change. The study investigates those grammatical categories that show variation in verbal and non-verbal predication or that are results of grammaticalization processes that include changes in non-finite verb forms. The topics of the articles are adjectival words, modal and evidential categories, and the essive-translative constructions in Tundra Nenets. The data consists of published texts in Tundra Nenets from different periods of time representing different genres, as well as fieldwork material recorded on the Taimyr Peninsula in 2011. The approach is functional typological, and the methodology combines synchronic linguistic description and diachronic explanation of the grammatical phenomena. The linguistic processes are analysed with relation to language use and context, and their development is explained with relation to the synchronic variation in the language and similar structural and functional paths of change in other languages. The findings of this study complement earlier research by suggesting mechanisms and paths of change for categories whose origin has been hypothesized in earlier studies. The results suggest that non-finite verb forms often serve as a basis for modal and evidential verb forms in Tundra Nenets, but they can also take part in grammaticalization processes that produce nominal categories, such as the essive-translative suffix. At the same time, the study provides syntactic analyses of lesser studied grammatical categories in Tundra Nenets. It also contributes to the more general discussion on finiteness and infiniteness as well as the division of main word classes in grammatical change.
  • Lauranto, Yrjö (Helsingin yliopisto, 2015)
    This study examines directivity and imperative clauses (henceforth i-clauses) in Finnish. It consists of 3 publications (P1, P2 and P3). While the theoretical basis of the study is systemic-functional linguistics, use is also made of other approaches. P1 concentrates on the description of the imperative, and, thus, the data consist mainly of intuited examples. Firstly, the Finnish imperative can be regarded as a paradigm consisting of the personal forms of the present. This is reflected in traditional descriptions of the Finnish verb, which treat the imperative as one of the moods. This is referred to as the synchronic-morphological perspective. Secondly, the imperative can be examined from the perspective of interaction and interactional constructions. This is called the diachronic-interactive perspective. P2 investigates the canonical i-clause in everyday conversations between friends and family members. The data consist of approx. 140 conversations or excerpts of conversation. 70 % of the data are telephone conversations. One of the characteristics of the i-clause is that it is employed as a response to what has been said before or as a response to the non-linguistic action that is going on during the conversation. Approx. 63 % of the i-clauses in the data (n = 243) can be considered strongly responsive. Another significant finding is that only 10 % of the i-clauses of the data are interpreted by the participants in the conversations as commands. P2 suggests two ways of defining the notion of a directive. From a wider perspective, directives include not only exhortations to action but also offers and permissions. From a narrow perspective, offers and permissions are excluded because they are used to provide addressees with commodities or to enable them to act in the way they themselves wish. P3 discusses two clause constructions that begin with a finite verb conjugated in the 2nd person of the conditional mood but which do not allow a pronoun functioning as the subject. The data consist of everyday interaction and electronically mediated conversations from the Internet. One of the constructions is clearly an optative structure, whereas the other tends to be used as a persuasive expression. It can thus be seen as a grammaticalization of directivity. The study sheds light on the Finnish i-clause and its use, but also on directivity in general. The results are also of relevance to the teaching of Finnish as a second language. Key words: interactional syntax, interpersonal, imperative clause, morphological imperative, everyday conversations, directives, directivity, grammatical metaphor, optative, persuasion, grammaticalization, systemic-functional linguistics
  • Lantto, Hanna (Helsingin yliopisto, 2015)
    This doctoral dissertation examines the role of code-switching between Basque and Spanish linguistic elements in the metropolitan area of Greater Bilbao in the Basque Country. The study consists of four articles and a compilation article. The articles examine bilingual speech from different points of view: variation in grammatical code-switching patterns, the role of swearing, slang and code-switching in constructing an informal register of Basque, language ideologies that discourage and encourage code-switching, and conventionalization of semantic-pragmatic code-switching patterns. The Basque context of language revitalization has created new divisions between speakers, as the formerly unidirectional bilingualism has turned into a situation where great numbers of Spanish speakers are learning Basque in adult acquisition programs or in Basque-medium education. Basque is still, however, a minority language in the Greater Bilbao area and the bilingual Basque speakers live scattered among the monolingual majority. The effect of these social structures on linguistic structures is examined in two sets of data that were collected for the purposes of this study. For the first set of data, 22 hours of naturally occurring peer-group conversations with 22 Basque-Spanish bilinguals were recorded, while the second set consists of 12 hours of metalinguistic conversations with 47 bilingual Basques. The speakers use their bilingual repertoire in numerous creative and dynamic ways. Yet some tendencies can be detected. Colloquial Basque in Bilbao is a bilingual speech style that always includes some code-switching to Spanish. There is considerable variation in the individuals code-switching patterns. Some of the informants, particularly L1-speakers of Basque, use very intensive and syntactically intrusive code-switching, whereas others, especially L2-speakers of Basque, only engage in syntactically peripheral code-switching, such as Spanish interjections, discourse markers and tags. The L2-speakers purist tendencies seem to have two sources: firstly, the normative setting of acquisition where language mixing is discouraged, and secondly, the general interpretation of new speakers code-switching as lack of proficiency in the minority language. Some Spanish elements have become conventionalized throughout the speech community as the default option. All informants use Spanish discourse markers, and swear words and colloquialisms are always introduced in Spanish in otherwise Basque speech. Spanish discourse markers seem to have been automatized as conversational routines, whereas Spanish swear words and colloquialisms have become conventionalized because of the domains they are associated with, and because of the lack of these stylistic categories in standard Basque.
  • Pasanen, Annika (Suomalais-ugrilainen seura ja Helsingin yliopisto, 2015)
    The topic of this study is the revitalization of the Inari Saami language, the only Saami language spoken exclusively in Finland. The Inari Saami language became severely endangered in the 1900s, and toward the 1990s its extinction seemed inevitable. Thanks to conscious efforts originating from the community, this grim path of development was reversed. The most important factors for reversing language shift have been the language nest (an Inari Saami immersion program for children under school age), mother tongue medium school instruction and intensive language education for adults. The Inari Saami language association Anarâškielâ servi, founded in 1986, has played the most important role in the revitalization activities. The study investigates the revitalization of the Inari Saami language on the societal and individual levels between 1997 and 2014. The data consists of interviews with members of the language community, observations from Inari Saami-speaking environments, questionnaires sent to members of Anarâškielâ servi, reports from students of the intensive adult language education program and interviews with their language masters, as well as editorials from the Inari Saami-language Anarâš newspaper. The data is analysed primarily in the light of three main concepts: linguistic culture, language ideologies and ideological clarification. In the study, linguistic culture refers to the combination of historical, political, geographical, sociological, demographic and ideological circumstances under which the Inari Saami language has experienced endangerment and subsequent revitalization. The concept of language ideologies encompasses the language-related attitudes, beliefs, principles and choices prevalent in the language community that have facilitated the revitalization of the language. A third decisive phenomenon from the perspective of the outcome of revitalization is manifested in the process of ideological clarification, which refers to facing language ideologies consciously, recognizing the goals and means of revitalization, and personally committing to and taking responsibility for one,s own language. The study demonstrates that on a global scale, Inari Saami revitalization has been exceptionally successful. During the period analysed in the study, transmission of the language to children has resumed, adults have begun to learn and reclaim the Inari Saami language through intensive language education, older native speakers have taken on an active role in the revitalization process and the use of the language has increased significantly in several integral domains, such as the home and school. The language is now valued by the local community, and has gradually gained a more equal position with the other Saami languages. The community-based revitalization of the Inari Saami language exemplifies a linguistic culture and language ideology that foster a reversal of language shift, including factors related to linguistic tolerance. The process of ideological clarification in the language community can be seen in the motivation and commitment of those who have learned Inari Saami as adults, in the personal reversal of language shift in families and social networks, and in collective endeavours to use Inari Saami whenever possible. On the other hand, the revitalization of Inari Saami is connected to several critical factors and questions that have been investigated relatively little in the language community as of the end of this study. These include questions related to the language skills and linguistic identities of new speakers, language transmission at home vs. outside of the home, and the linguistic choices and identities of children and youth. These questions are significant with regard to the vitality of the language and should be examined both in daily life in the linguistic community and in future studies.
  • Santala, Susanna (Helsingin yliopisto, 2015)
    In this historiographical study I evaluate the placement of Eero Saarinen s airport terminals in the history of modern architecture. His Trans World Airlines Terminal (1956-62) and Dulles International Airport (1958-63) were the first airport terminals to enter the annals of modern architecture. I hypothesize that the airport terminal was previously excluded as a building type from historiography since it was seen as infrastructure, not architecture. Furthermore, its modernity did not coincide with the aims of historians, who could not utilize an emergent building type to demonstrate how modernism revolutionized architectural vocabularies. Discussing the related histories of aviation and technologies, the typological instability of the airport terminal, and Saarinen s architectural practice, I utilize genealogy, microhistory, and Science and Technology Studies to intervene in the historiography of modern architecture. Specifically, I question the assumption that architecture follows technological developments, the narrow interpretation of modernity dominating the writing of architectural history, and the resulting myopia in the classification of emerging building types. I view Saarinen s architectural practice as one of the many laboratories for a new architecture. Mapping such laboratories reveals a multifaceted view of postwar architecture, where modernism is explained by individual actors laboring at their localized sites to mediate a particular kind of modernity. I argue that Saarinen s engagement with technology and his laboratory-like working methods reconciled the contradictions between modern architecture and its blind spot, the airport terminal. This synthesis allowed the terminal building to transcend its utilitarian-technological nature as transportation infrastructure and led to its inclusion in the history of modern architecture as a building type that has its own history and parameters for design. This study makes three contributions. It outlines the history of the airport terminal emphasizing buildings that could have easily found their place in the canon of modern architecture. It explains the reasons for their exclusion and suggests ways to reduce the canon s myopia towards variants of modernism. More broadly, this study contributes to our understanding of the historiography of modern architecture and its logic of including emergent buildings by acknowledging the airport terminal as an emblematic building type of the twentieth century.
  • Wahlström, Max (Helsingin yliopiston nykykielten laitos, 2015)
    Case inflection, which is characteristic of Slavic languages, was lost in Bulgarian and Macedonian between approximately the 11th and 16th centuries. My doctoral dissertation examines the process of this linguistic change and sets out to find its causes and evaluate its consequences. In the earlier research literature, the case loss has been attributed either to language contacts or to language-internal developments such as sound changes, yet none of the theories based on a single explanatory factor has proven satisfactory. In this study, I argue that previous researchers into Late Medieval manuscripts often tried to date the language changes earlier than is plausible in light of the textual evidence. I also propose that the high number of second-language speakers is among the key factors reducing the number of morphological categories in a language; meanwhile, several minor developments related to the case loss for instance, in the marking of possession are likely to have resulted from a specific contact mechanism known as the Balkan linguistic area. My main methodological claim is that the study of language contacts must take into account a general typological perspective. Furthermore, quantitative typological methods are also helpful in assessing whether the shared linguistic features within a linguistic area emerged independently of each other. This dissertation is divided into three parts, each representing a different methodological approach. Through corpus methods, among other approaches, the first part examines the process of the loss of case inflection within the manuscript tradition stemming from Old Church Slavonic. The second approach is based on the study of language contacts. I compare the development of the Bulgarian and Macedonian case systems with the Albanian, Balkan Romance, and Greek case systems and their evolution. In addition, using the Romani language as an example, I analyze the effect of the sociolinguistic setting on the type of contact-induced language change. The third approach examines the case systems of Bulgarian and Macedonian and the rest of the Balkan linguistic area in a cross-linguistic connection to evaluate the extent to which the phenomena related to the case loss can be attributed to universal tendencies observed in the languages of the world.
  • Fields, Marek (Helsingin yliopisto, 2015)
    The study examines British and American propaganda and cultural diplomacy in Finland during the first decades of the Cold War. As the Cold War intensified in the late 1940s, both Britain and the United States sharpened their informational and cultural activities throughout the world. The general goal of these operations was not only the promotion of culture and the Western way of life , but also the containment of communism. For the distribution of anti-communist propaganda and the projection of culture, the British used printed material prepared by a special Foreign Office unit, BBC broadcasts and operations executed by the British Council, while the Americans relied on material produced by the United States Information Agency (USIA), including Voice of America (VOA) broadcasts. The United States also emphasised the importance of the exchange of people through, for example, the Fulbright Programme. The two Western powers operations were also conducted in exceptional environments such as Finland, in which the country s complex relationship with the Soviet Union meant that the distribution of anti-communist propaganda, for example, through Finnish newspapers was always going to be a sensitive affair. Although the British and Americans knew that the majority of Finns resented communism, they were constantly worried about finding the appropriate methods to promote their message to the broader masses. In addition to informational and cultural activities, Britain, and in particular the United States, through the CIA, also supported the anti-communist work of some Finnish organisations. The general objective of this study is to discover the nature of British and American propaganda and cultural diplomacy operations in Finland. The focus lies on their breadth, closer traits and the channels used in their execution. Furthermore, the aim is to discuss how certain characteristics of Finnish society, such as the widely accepted practice of self-censorship, affected the Western powers operational methods. Some emphasis is also placed on examining the effects of these activities and comparing the two campaigns with each other. The study is predominantly based on archived documents of the British Foreign Office, the British Council, the BBC, the US State Department and the USIA. Furthermore, records filed at numerous Finnish archives provide valuable information about the Western operations' distribution processes, while certain Finnish newspapers and magazines make up essential sources for the examination of propaganda content. This study comes to the conclusion that both Britain and the United States carried out reasonably extensive propaganda and cultural diplomacy operations in Finland in the first Cold War decades, and as a consequence supported the country's independence and attachment to the West to a greater extent than has been previously recognised. The placement of British anti-communist articles in Finnish newspapers was especially successful in the early 1950s. The BBC Finnish Service broadcasts, which included anti-communist output, were also rather warmly welcomed by the Finns as were the operations of the British Council, despite its fairly slim resources. In addition to press operations, the Americans were able to influence a considerable number of Finns especially through USIA films, television programmes, the exchange of people and other cultural operations. The Finnish political crises of the late 1950s and early 1960s restricted Western activities and forced the countries to find new methods of operation. Despite this, the impact British and American informational and cultural activities had on Finnish society can be regarded as substantial.
  • Kivilaakso, Katri (Helsingin yliopisto, 2015)
    This study explores Pirkko Saisio s novel, Kainin tytär (Cain s Daughter, 1984) published under her own name, and her later novels that were published under different pseudonyms. Kiusaaja (Tornmenter, 1986), Viettelijä (Seducer, 1987) and Kantaja (Bearer, 1991) were published under the male pseudonym Jukka Larsson, and Puolimaailman nainen (A Demimonde, 1990) and Kulkue (Procession, 1992) were published under the female pseudonym, Eva Wein. My research investigates the poetics of gender difference constructed by these works, when considered in particular from the three perspectives of authorship, intertextuality and narrative structure. The novels are contextualized within Finnish feminist-oriented research and discourse on women s literature of the 1980s. During the spring of 1985, author Pirkko Saisio took part in a seminar on research in women s literature held at the University of Turku. This seminar addressed issues of research from feminist perspectives that were typical of the period, such as the different receptions of work by male and female writers, and the possible differences between literature written by men and women respectively. Pirkko Saisio was aware of feminist literary discourse of the 1980s and, as demonstrated in the present study, she also contributed to the discourse by writing under both male and female pseudonyms. The theoretical underpinning of the present study is feminist literary research. I interpret Saisio's switching from one pseudonym to another as the author commenting on the gender debates from outside the binary logic of male and female. From her borderline position, she worked not as a female or male author, but as a bit of both, or neither. The author's struggle to create a perspective beyond women's literature is precisely what makes Pirkko Saisio a lesbian feminist writer. The novels' intertextual references need to be contextualized within the literary discourse at the time of publication, defining the relationship of Saisio s Kainin tytär and her pseudonym novels with the literary tradition. The different relationships of male and female writers to this tradition were among the key issues of feminist literary discussion in the 1980s. Saisio s novels under different pseudonyms share a number of intertexts that are important for interpreting all of them and assemble the six novels into a whole. The main intertexts addressed in this study contain explicit or implicit statements on gender difference or the meaning of gender. Therefore analyzing the intertextual references open up the thematization of the problematic of gender in the novels. The novels of Saisio, Larsson and Wein also shared certain thematically central structural elements repeated from one work to another, such as a cyclical chronological structure, embedded narratives and recurring motifs. Pirkko Saisio s, Jukka Larsson s and Eva Wein s novels did not respond to the discussion on women s literature of the 1980s in any unequivocal way. Writing as Wein and Larsson, Saisio created a unique literary output that responded polemically to the literary debate of its time of publication, testing the boundaries and definitions of not only authorship and reception but also of literary production and the literary work . Keywords: author, authorship, gender, poetics, intertextuality, feminist narratology, feminist literary research, lesbian author, lesbian
  • Salo, Merja (Helsingin yliopisto, 2015)
    All of the Volga region languages investigated in this study (Mordvin, Mari, and Chuvash) have a rich derivational morphology. In general linguistics terms, they all have a passive classified as a reflexive passive. The relationship between the derivative and the root verb is described using the valence roles of case grammar. The role of the first, or primary, actant is crucial in defining all the different meanings of the derived verbs in question. The main roles used to express the first actants are: AGENTIVE, ACTOR, NEUTRAL, EXPERIENCER, and FORCE. In Mordvin, passive sentences contain a special polyfunctional derivative suffix, -v-, which also renders the automative, reflexive, perfective and unintentional meaning, as well as dynamic modality. Besides the -v-, the rare and almost forgotten -t-, shares most of these meanings. Moreover, in many respects, these suffixes show parallel development. Contemporary speakers use these t-verbs to express unpleasant feelings and negative physiological states. t-derivatives can also be used to describe weather conditions as the only constituent part of a sentence, but this use is marginal. These two usages bring the t-derivatives close to the impersonal in the Indo-European languages. Furthermore, Mari and Chuvash have very similar suffixes, the reflexive-passive -ǝlt- or -Alt-, and the passive -l- and the reflexive -n-, respectively. Their passives do not permit an agent, and automative meanings are common, as are reflexives. My material proves that both Chuvash suffixes can have identical meanings. Interestingly, in all three languages, zero meaning occurs with intransitive root verbs. Finally, meteorological verbs in 14 Uralic languages were studied from a syntactic perspective. Some verbs have zero valence, others display a more or less semantically faded subject, while others feature an object. With causative transitive verbs, the prevailing restriction seems to be that either a subject or an object is possible, but both are not. Earlier, it was assumed that the sentence type V is Uralic, but according to my findings it is absent in some of the Samoyed languages and that the SV or VS type is more widely known. The introduction provides background information on the history of the Volga region and the many alternative ways of expressing passive and related meanings in the Uralic languages. An agent in a passive sentence is rare, and thus special attention is given to its expression. It seems obvious that the agent has been completely absent in passive sentences in the Uralic and Turkic languages. Many of these languages, however, have now developed an agent under the influence of the Indo-European languages. Furthermore, the construction with a dummy subject has started to spread and now occurs in the Saami and Finnic languages.
  • Buchholz, Matias (Helsingin yliopisto, 2015)
    The aim of the present work (Roman Law in Greek: Prolegomena to a Linguistic Study of the Composition and Semantics of the Byzantine Vocabulary of Procedural Law) is to study the composition and semantics of Byzantine Greek legal vocabulary, especially that related to procedural law, from the perspective of the Latin influence on Greek. The work is based on a contact-linguistic and semantic analysis of the occurrences of a number of relevant expressions in the primary sources (not only technical terms in the narrowest sense, but also polysemous words). These occurrences have been mainly extracted from the databases TLG (literary sources), PHI (inscriptions) and DDbDP (papyri). The work is not an exhaustive treatment of all relevant words. Instead, by focusing on a selection of examples and on methodological questions, it tries to open a new perspective on Byzantine legal language. The first main chapter (Chapter 4) provides an overview of the ways in which Latin influenced the composition of Byzantine legal vocabulary. Previous research has often focused on lexical borrowings, but, since these are only part of the story, I argue that our understanding of Byzantine legal vocabulary would benefit from an increased attention to semantic borrowings (loan translations/calques and borrowed meanings) and to unchanged Greek words (that is, their continued use vs. their marginalization through Latin influence). I also evaluate the usefulness of different criteria for the distinction between integrated and non-integrated lexical borrowings (Lehnwort vs. Fremdwort). I claim that, i.a., morphological adaptation is not a conclusive criterion, while frequency and distribution over different sub-genres of legal writings are more informative. In addition, I argue that the phenomenon of code-switching, practically neglected in previous studies on Byzantine legal language, was present and would warrant further linguistic research. Chapter 5 is devoted to the semantics of Byzantine legal vocabulary, especially to the ways it differed from that of Latin, and to whether these differences are due to contact-induced change or to language-internal developments. The meanings of individual words often contracted or expanded, and sometimes even shifted. I propose certain systematic effects, e.g., that loanwords are easily affected by a contraction of meaning, and that the lack of contact-induced semantic change is largely restricted to technical terms proper. These developments concerning individual words mean that the semantic structure of Byzantine legal vocabulary as a whole is different from the legal vocabulary of Latin. Even if this has no effects on the legal system itself, it certainly means that we are dealing with another view of that system.
  • Andersen, Claus Elholm (University of Helsinki, 2015)
    You have to be on your guard - On Literariness in Karl Ove Knausgård's My Struggle This dissertation is a discussion of literariness in Karl Ove Knausgård,s novel My Struggle (2009-2011). I argue that My Struggle first and foremost is a novel and should be read accordingly. Though Knausgård might challenge the genre of the novel as we know it, I show how he does so within the framework of one of the strongest traditions in the 20th century. This tradition includes writers such as Proust, Joyce, and Thomas Mann, all of whom, like Knausgård, have sought to challenge the novel as such. Thus, Knausgård is stretching the limits of what a novel can be by taking his point of departure in the challenge that already exists in the genre. Read this way, Knausgård expands the limits of what a novel is and can do, so it becomes impossible to ignore him as a novelist. The dissertation is based on five articles published, or accepted for publication, in peer-reviewed academic journals. Combined, these articles show how Knausgård as a writer belongs to a literary tradition that can be seen as an extension of literary modernism. In each article, I identify what I have named the central paradox of the novel that Knausgård wants to write honestly about his life, but can only do so in the form of a novel and by using the literary devices from the world of fiction. It is through the analysis of this central paradox that I portray the literariness of the novel. Aside from the five articles, the dissertation also consists of a cap or a summarizing report where I place the articles in relation to the existing scholarship on Knausgård and explain my theoretical framework and why I consider it important to read My Struggle as novel. Here, I argue that the dissertation is in clear opposition to the majority of what has previously been written on Knausgård, where the focus has been on how Knausgård plays with reality and fiction instead of striving to understand what the novel is trying to say.
  • Ito, Sanae (Helsingin yliopisto, 2015)
    Assurbanipal, the last great king of the Assyrian Empire (934-609 BC), ruled from 668 BC until at least 630 BC. He had to spend four years suppressing a revolt by ama - umu-ukīn, his older brother and the king of Babylon (667-648 BC), but his reign was much longer than his predecessors and he controlled almost all the area of the Ancient Near East. One of the essential bodies of research material on his reign is his correspondence, which has never before been studied in detail because much of it has been published in cuneiform copies only. His extant correspondence consists of 359 letters: 72 letters from him (the so-called royal letters) and 287 letters to him. Royal letters are particularly rare in the Assyrian correspondence and Assurbanipal s royal letters outnumber those of his predecessors, hence this dissertation focuses on them. The letters deal with political, military, and diplomatic matters through the king s point of view and in his words. The aim of this research has been to find out what image of himself Assurbanipal tried to convey in his letters and how he utilized the image in order to further Assyrian policies. The dissertation uses philological method and also takes advantage of the electronic database of the Neo-Assyrian Text Corpus Project (Helsinki), which contains the majority of texts of the Neo-Assyrian period in transliteration. Most of Assurbanipal s royal letters were written during the revolt and its aftermath, and sent to Babylonia, Elam, and the Sealand, which were deeply involved in the revolt. Since the most common recipients of the missives were citizens, Assurbanipal clearly considered it particularly important to address the population at large when the revolt shook the foundation of the empire. As the royal letters originate in the state archives in the capital of Assyria, Nineveh, most of them are archival copies or drafts. Two languages and two scripts (Neo-Assyrian, Neo-Babylonian) were used in them, but the drafts would have first been drawn up in Neo-Assyrian, and later translated into Neo-Babylonian, perhaps first in Assyrian script and only later in Babylonian script. Assurbanipal had dialogue with both adversaries and adherents, emphasized the favours he had done, and described himself as a benevolent and merciful king who was capable of establishing justice, peace, and equality in the realm. He involved Nippur and Uruk in Assyrian military activities against rebels and settled a sibling rivalry between the governor of Ur and his predecessor. He continued a conciliatory policy towards Babylon even during the revolt in order to resolve the conflict peacefully. He tried to incorporate foreign countries into Assyrian control by treaties and sometimes exerted direct pressure on them with thinly veiled threats. Some countries came under Assyrian rule at their own initiative in order to acquire military and political gains from Assyria. Throughout the royal letters, he stressed his devotion to the gods and their support for his rule. Especially A ur, supreme god of Assyria, was an important figure in the letters.