Humanistinen tiedekunta

 

Recent Submissions

  • Katajamäki, Sakari (ntamo, 2016)
    Kukunor. Dream and the tradition of nonsense literature in Lauri Viitaʼs long poem This study examines Lauri Viita s (1916 1965) long poem Kukunor. Satu ihmislapsille [‛Koko Nor. A fairy tale for human children ] (1949) and its dream features from the perspective of the European tradition of literary nonsense. Here nonsense literature is defined as language-centred and play- or game-like literature, which balances meaning or a multiplicity of meaning with an absence of meaning. Usually, nonsense literature is topsy-turvy and self-reflective and it frequently represents emotions that are at odds with current events. In addition to earlier research on nonsense literature, the present study uses the three most canonical European nonsense writers Edward Lear, Lewis Carroll and Christian Morgenstern as the corpus for defining and analysing this literary genre. This study analyses the kind of relations Kukunorʼs dream features (i.e., structures and themes connected with dreaming) have with its nonsensical features. It examines Viitaʼs long poem from several structural and thematic perspectives. Most of the essential structural phenomena analysed in this survey include topsy-turvydom, palimpsest structures, and autocentricity. Other topics of analysis include epistemological matters and the instability of the subject or its identity. The main linguistic research themes of this study focus on anomalies regarding referentiality and arbitrariness, the concreteness of language and literature, and linguistic generation. The epithet dream has seen repeated use in the context of nonsense literature, and many surveys have dealt with the relations between dreaming and nonsense, though not in depth. Thus, this study is both an analysis of Viitaʼs long poem and a survey of the interrelation between dreams and nonsensicality in the European canon of literary nonsense. The present study argues that many confusing or incoherent features in Kukunor embody many structures of dreams and nonsense literature. The survey of these intertwining structural, stylistic and thematic characteristics helps to perceive Viitaʼs long poem and the relations between its parts in new ways. Contrary to the view of Elizabeth Sewellʼs eminent book The Field of Nonsense (1952), the key features of the nonsense genre correspond in various ways with many characteristics of dreaming. In Kukunor, Lauri Viita masters both the structural features of dreaming and the poetics of nonsense literature. Kukunor is exceptional among Viita s literary works, but analysing it offers new perspectives for understanding Viita s entire oeuvre.
  • Fränti-Pitkäranta, Marttiina (2016)
    Abstract This doctoral dissertation in metrological terminology is entitled Mittayksiköistä, maa-alojen mitoista ja arkkitehtonisista mittasuhteista antiikin Roomassa (On units of measurement, measures of land area and architectural dimensions in ancient Rome) and is included in the field of ancient languages and cultures within the Doctoral Programme for History and Cultural Heritage. This dissertation is based on Latin-language primary sources, i.e., texts that concern the ancient unit of the foot, measurements and names of land area, architectural symmetry relationships and metrological and terminological material related to the design of the Italic atrium-style house. The dissertation also discussis several Greek-language terms for units of measurement as well as words for land area and boundary markers in different languages. A significant part focuses on Vitruvius s concept of scaenographia, which was used by ancient architects and visual artists and was a precedent of what is today called perspective drawing. Because I will also explore these themes as an architect, my method and approach can be described as a combination of the linguistic, the mathematical and the visual.The dissertation includes 47 Latin-language citations drawn from critical editions of the following 12 authors: Varro, Vitruvius, Pliny, Columella, Frontinus, Balbus, Pseudo-Balbus, Festus, Boethius, Isidore, Pseudo-Boethius and Gerbert. I have translated into Finnish these previously untranslated citations, explained their content and meaning and, in some cases, described terminological continuums as part of the cultural heritage. Persons relevant to the topic in the classical and later periods include the following: Adelbold, Agatharchus, Alberti, Anaxagoras, Apuleius, Archimedes, Archytas, Augustine, Augustus, Barbaro, Vincent of Beauvois, Bede, Poggio Bracciolini, Bramante, Brunelleschi, Caesar, Calcidius, Cato, Cerceau, Cesariano, Cetius Faventinus, Chrysippus, Cicero, Circe, Claudius, Clodius Pulcher, Dante, Democritus, Diophantus, Dürer, Eratosthenes, Euclid, Fannius Synistor, Fibonacci, Piero della Francesca, Fulvius Nobilius, Gaius, Galen, Gellius, Geminus, Fra Giocondo, Hadrian, Heron, Hyginus, Justinian, Leonardo da Vinci, Lorenzetti, Marcus Lucretius, Lucretius Fronto, Martial, Masaccio, Nero, Nicomachus, Novius, Octavia, Odysseus, Luca Pacioli, Plato, Polybius, Polykleitos, Priscus, Proclus, Pseudo-Hyginus, Pseudo-Nipsus, Pythagoras, Quintilian, Romulus, Seneca, Septimius Severus, Siculus Flaccus, Solinus, Solon, Strabo, Sulpicius Rufus, Suetonius, Symmachus, Theodora, Trajan and the author of the fragments of Varro.The research literature includes not only primary sources, but also publications in the fields of archaelogy and architecture, the visual arts, metrology and terminology in several languages (English, Finnish, French, German, Italian, Latin, Spanish and Swedish). Morover, the dissertation comprises 40 research images used to illustrade my writing. Of them, 27 include scenographic and geometric vistas I have reconstructed from Roman and Campanian architectural wall paintings. Three of the images feature my drawings related to Vitruvius s instructions for the dimensions of an Italic atrium house. In ten of the images, I explore the dimensions of the atrium and its adjoinining rooms based on Vitruvius s instructions. The images are based on my plan drawing of Marcus Lucretius s atrium house in Pompeii.
  • Ylivuori, Soile (2015)
    My doctoral dissertation examines the complex relationship of gender construction and politeness in eighteenth-century England. It contributes to a vibrant field of historical research, examining politeness as an intellectual and cultural construct that was used to create individual and group identity. The study combines intellectual and cultural-historical methods with poststructuralist gender studies; through this interdisciplinary methodology, my goal is to introduce a novel approach to the historical research of politeness traditionally reluctant to utilise theoretical apparatuses as an aid of analysis and to suggest that such methods provide fruitful new readings of politeness and its intersection with gender, thus opening up new areas of research. The dissertation is divided into two parts. In the first part, I analyse politeness as a disciplinary practice that produced polite femininity defined in terms of softness, gracefulness, and modesty by regulating the movements and appearances of individuals bodies. This analysis is based on a wide selection of printed source material, such as conduct books, periodicals, sermons, and novels. My main argument is that the female body had a central role in the construction of normative polite femininity, both on a discursive and an individual level. Women of the social elite were urged to internalise a gendered polite identity by exercising and disciplining their bodies to meet the norms of polite femininity deemed natural despite the fact that within the heterogeneous politeness discourse, there was no consensus on what these natural norms exactly were. Moreover, I want to suggest that the ambiguous position of the body as both the means through which an identity is produced and worked on, as well as the allegedly truthful and unerring indicator of an individual s level of polite ideality created a fundamental conflict within the culture of politeness, forcing women into hypocritical positions in practice while simultaneously advocating honesty as the essential emblem of femininity. However, seeing politeness solely as a disciplinary regime provides a one-sided understanding of politeness, since it ignores individual subjectivity. Therefore, the second part of my dissertation examines the journals and letters of four eighteenth-century elite women Catherine Talbot, Mary Delany, Elizabeth Montagu, and Fanny Burney and looks at how these women dealt with the discursive ideals and demands imposed upon them. I argue that individuals had a complex relationship with discursive ideality, and that politeness was not solely a disciplinary regime that lorded over women s behaviour and identity. The profound heterogeneity of the culture of politeness gave, in itself, individuals some freedom of movement within it. More importantly, individuals engaged in specific strategies, or techniques of the self, in order to gain freedom from and within the restrictive norms of polite femininity. These strategies can be seen as clever utilisations of some of the central aspects of politeness with a subversive intent. They concentrate on challenging and redefining the naturalised formulations regarding authenticity, identity, femininity, and politeness, and include such practices as self-discipline, multiplicity of identity, play between exterior and interior, and hypocrisy.
  • Klein, Ottilie ([according to German regulations a publication prior to the public examination is not permitted], 2015)
    The doctoral thesis investigates the cultural function of dramatic narratives of female murder. For this purpose, the study offers textual analyses of plays that feature female murder as a central event. Paying close attention to each play s plot, form, and dramaturgy, the study seeks to attach meaning to the dramatic function of women s homicidal action. The survey of women who kill in modern American drama that is at the heart of the study covers a seventy-year span (1910s - 1980s) that allows a mapping out of continuities and transitions in dramatizations of female murder. Given the politically charged nature of the figure of the female murderer, the study argues that there are two types of narratives of female murder in modern American drama (and beyond): one that uses women s homicidal action as a mechanism to create disorder at the level of plot to ultimately contain women s lethal threat by re-establishing order and thereby reinforcing dominant ideology, so-called narratives of containment; and one that exploits the ideologically disruptive potential of the female murderer to comment on social ills or to dismantle ideological contradictions, so-called lethal performances. The study concludes that the cultural function of narratives of female murder is intricately connected with the cultural and historical moment from which they emerge and the type of narrative they respond to.
  • Viholainen, Aila (Viholainen, Aila, 2015)
    My dissertation research concentrates on medieval Western Christian pictorial material presented in religious contexts. The common perspective of the different articles included in my research is make to believe/faire croire : the ways in which pictorial materials in medieval times persuaded, enticed and instructed viewers. My study is characterized by a rhetorical approach that focuses especially on the visuality of medieval images and its analysis. I participate in the study of the past. I see the past that I study as an alien entity located in its own historical context. I am looking for answers from a vantage point that feels strange from the position of the contemporary re-searcher. Questions that arise from consideration of this reveal a gap between the researcher s understanding of today and how things were under-stood in medieval times, a gap which motivates this research. In the first two articles of my work, the medieval world of imagery is perceived as a phenomenon on an abstract level. Here I study and evaluate discussions and studies that have been done in medieval times and subsequently: conceptually, theoretically and methodologically. In the latter two articles, the abstract phenomenon becomes concrete and the focus of analysis is actual pictorial material selected from the medieval world of imagery found in the Holy Cross Church of Hattula. In these articles, the mermaid motif functions as an object of analysis. Imagining is an important practice in the context of medieval art and religion, and it is presented in my work as a supporting theme. First, imagination has operated in the background of my study as a guiding frame of interpretation, as the researcher s own resource. In this case, as Markku Hyrkkänen describes it, imagination can be thought of as an imagining of possible contexts. Second, imagination has worked as a concrete conceptual tool: as Benedict Anderson's imagined communities and later as Barbara Newman's imaginative theology. Third, it is also a medieval concept (imaginatio), the primary task of which was to determine truth. Thus, imagination was a multi-leveled and many-faceted cognitive skill. I locate my research, as well as international studies that I use for dialogue, in a broader humanistic tradition and the research trends of the last decades. Used as the starting point are critical evaluations of previous studies in art history, the study of visual culture and medieval art history over the last decades. I also connect my work to the latest Finnish studies on medieval pictorial material, as well as to the latest research discussions in my own field of religious studies. These findings are definitively presented in the compilation.
  • Gustafsson, Sofia (Finska Vetenskaps-Societeten, 2015)
    In 1748, the Swedish Crown began construction of the fortress Sveaborg outside Helsinki. This was an expensive military investment, but where did the money invested actually end up? Traditionally historians have claimed that the burghers of Helsinki benefitted economically from the construction. However, studies of early-modern Western European fortress construction sites show that local communities did not necessarily benefit directly; the money could just as easily have gone to large entrepreneurs from the central areas. The aim of this study is to identify which geographical areas and social groups sold the construction materials needed to build Sveaborg during the first period of construction in 1748-1756. It also discusses the institutional constraints, whether formal or informal, that limited the suppliers actions and choices. The main source material is the accounts of the Fortification Fund in Helsinki. However, to identify the sellers, we combined this material with local civil and private sources. The accounts rarely provided enough information for identification, and the key-question involved determining where to search for local and private sources. Alfred Weber s theory of location of economic activities claims that the optimal location for production depends on labour and transportation costs. The logistics of Sveaborg were water-based, so the search focused on coastal regions either near the fortress or with unique natural resources. With regard to the institutions, we used the theories of Douglass C. North. The laws of the period limited trade to certain groups in the cities, but equally important were the restrictions on suitable conduct for different estates. However, institutions constantly change, and according to Sten Carlsson, the traditional social system in 18th-century Sweden was already in decline. The results suggest that different economic zones specialising in certain products emerged around the fortress. Suppliers benefitting from Sveaborg could be found not only in the city of Helsinki, but also in the surrounding countryside. Other Finnish cities supplying the fortress include Porvoo, Turku and Loviisa. In Sweden, the main areas involved were Stockholm and Gotland. In contrast to the traditional view, one could definitely not claim that the burghers of Helsinki alone profited from the construction. Although formal constraints should have restricted the participation of other social groups, the informal constraints were obviously more permissive. Unlike in Western Europe, where the states tended to use large entrepreneurs from the central areas, the Swedish Crown used small entrepreneurs from the periphery. The money invested in Sveaborg was spread over large areas and many hands, including peasants, merchants, and noblemen.
  • von Boehm, Jukka (2015)
    The study analyses the performance history and Wirkungsgeschichte of Richard Wagner s Lohengrin (premiered 1850) in Germany and Russia in the 20th century. In Wagner s opera the mysterious knight arrives in medieval Brabant, where the people receive him as their redeemer . Lohengrin became one of Adolf Hitler s favourite operas. Through analysis of Lohengrin s influence, the study casts light on a broad and complex theme: how did Wagner s ideas and art become intertwined with Nazi ideology? Or how were they received in the context of other radical societal experiments, namely Soviet and East German socialism? This examination of different interpretations of the same text (Lohengrin) on stage and through its reception will reveal prevailing societal attitudes, taboos, values and hopes. Case study I discusses the reception of a few nationalist themes in Lohengrin. Specifically, the focus is on ultra-nationalist projections onto Lohengrin, which emerged during the resurgence of late 19th-century German Hurrah-patriotism and Nazi ideology. The focus of Case study II is on Heinz Tietjen s direction of Lohengrin at the Bayreuth Festival during the Third Reich (1936). The study demonstrates how Tietjen embedded Nazi ideology in his reading. Case study III takes another look at Lohengrin s influence on Soviet and East German socialism. The study scrutinises the ambivalent role of Lohengrin in the context of a dogmatic communist cultural policy that valued (socialist) realism. Another theme discussed is the problematic relationship of Lohengrin to the German Democratic Republic and its anti-fascism. Case study IV analyses Peter Konwitschny s innovative direction of Lohengrin in 1998. Characteristic of the deconstructive style of German director s theatre , the opera was set in a school classroom before the outbreak of the First World War. Konwitschny s interpretation offers an excellent case for analysing strategies by which a modern direction can take up the challenge of ideologically ambivalent opera. The study challenges the commonly oversimplified narrative that presents Wagner as a forerunner of Hitler and Nazism. Although there was irrational potential in Lohengrin, which became topical in the Third Reich, the relationship between Wagner s opera and National Socialism is much more complex, including the fact that Wagner s utopian ideas in Lohengrin also inspired the left. The main primary sources consist of German archival material, newspapers and journals.
  • Henriksson, Laura (Suomen Musiikkitieteellinen Seura, 2015)
    Summary Vocal humour and critique in the couplet recordings by J. Alfred Tanner, Matti Jurva, Reino Helismaa, Juha Vainio and Veikko Lavi The aim of this study is to research the lyrics and singing styles of five Finnish couplet singers who are connected to the Finnish schlager tradition. The material-oriented study is performed by analyzing altogether 160 couplet recordings sung by J. Alfred Tanner, Matti Jurva, Reino Helismaa, Juha Vainio, and Veikko Lavi. The study examines the singers humoristic and critical approaches to the lyrics and investigates how the attitudes are performed orally by the singers. The aim of the study is to analyze the singing styles of the songs together with the content of the songs lyrics. The history of the couplet and the previous studies of the subject are reviewed in the beginning of the first part of the work, which also contains the methodological background of the work, which is divided into cultural models and attitudes and to textual and musical conventions. The methodological section introduces a viewpoint which takes into account the couplet songs musical and textual practices alongside with the general cultural views such as attitudes advocating the culture of contestation and hegemonic masculinity. A detailed analysis of Juha Vainio s couplet song Käyn ahon laitaa demonstrates in practice how the couplet recordings can be analyzed. In the articles the couplets themes are examined by using scientific concepts and by analysing couplet recordings. In the first article couplets and their critical attitudes towards persons in power are examined by using the term of carnivalism. The second article deals with self-irony of the couplets characters which is investigated by using the concept of incongruity and the relief theory previously used in humour studies. The subject of the third article is female characters in the couplet songs. The subjects of the fourth article are masculinity and its vocal interpretation in the songs. The theoretical framework of the study is based on the Judith Butler s concept of performativity and Zygmunt Bauman s categories of the postmodern pilgrim and its followers. Keywords: Couplet, humour, carnivalism, culture of contestation, performativity
  • Konttori, Johanna (2015)
    The aim of this study is to add a new perspective to the large body of scholarly work dealing with the debates on the use of headscarves and full veils in contemporary France. The study examines the discursive construction of national identity by members of the political and social elite as they discuss the use of headscarves in state schools, and the use of full veils in the public sphere more generally. The new perspective that the study presents is threefold. First, the study examines both headscarf and full veil debates, which have so far been mainly studied separately. Second, the data consists of the little-studied transcripts of the hearings organized by the two parliamentary commissions (the Debré and Gerin Commissions) that looked into the headscarf and full veil issues in 2003 and 2009, respectively. Third, even though it has been widely noted in the existing research literature that the headscarf and full veil debates were linked to national identity, it has not been common to draw theoretical insights from nationalism studies, as is done here. The analytical focus is on Muslims and Islam, headscarves and full veils, and their relation to the Republic, its identity and values (notably laïcité). Using analytical tools derived from the discourse-historical approach, the study shows the great variety of different perceptions of Islam and Muslims, but also laïcité, in the data. Even though headscarves and especially full veils are mostly regarded as problematic and even threatening to the Republic, this does not necessarily result in negative perceptions of Muslims and Islam. Finally, the study ponders the usefulness of binary categories. It is concluded that neither the Us vs Them categorization often linked to the construction of national identities nor the claim of Muslims as Others in France entirely fit the data. Instead, it is suggested that the concepts of stranger and national capital enable a more nuanced examination of the place of Muslims and Islam in France.
  • Nokkonen, Soili (Société Néophilologique, 2015)
    This cumulative dissertation is the first systematic study of semi-modal NEED TO and its semantic variation in Present-day British English. This topic is particularly relevant today, since the use of semi-modals, e.g., HAVE TO, HAVE (GOT) TO and NEED TO has increased in the field of obligation and necessity, while the frequencies of core modals such as MUST and NEED have decreased. The link of modal change with the process of democratization, and the way the semi-modals offer a less authoritarian way of obliging, present an interesting background for a corpus-based sociolinguistic study. The primary material of the five studies in this thesis is drawn from mainly spoken corpora from the 1950s to the 1990s. Both quantitative and qualitative methods are applied in data retrieval and the empirical analyses. The chosen corpora enable the exploration of NEED TO across variables such as real time, medium, the speaker variables of age, gender and social class, and a number of spoken registers. For comparison, Article 5 studies NEED TO and six other modals as variants of deontic obligation. The findings on the semantic variation indicate that the functions of NEED TO increasingly resemble those of core modals: the directive obligation uses cover most of the instances, and NEED TO is in the process of developing epistemic meaning. However, the original inherent necessity sense is still frequent. NEED TO shows clear social stratification. It is strongly favoured by the younger age groups, and they also use the newer semantic functions more. It is slightly more frequent among men in general, but in certain relevant speaker groups, e.g., among young adults, women have a lead. The upper middle class leads in its use. NEED TO is clearly undergoing change, but Labovian concepts cannot be applied in a rigid way. A finding that stands out is that register variation plays a decisive role. NEED TO is significantly more frequent in spoken public contexts as opposed to private contexts. Both the persuasive nature of a register and its high degree of interactivity increase the use of NEED TO. The basic inherent meaning relates to the strategic value of NEED TO in a deontic situation by softening an imposed obligation as being in the addressee s best interest. Indeed, NEED TO has found a niche in the face-to-face conversations where it is necessary to negotiate power and also to oblige the addressee in the least face-threatening manner.
  • Mainio, Aleksi (Omakustanne, 2015)
    The October Revolution in 1917 led to Europe being divided into two camps. The turmoil in Russia also affected Finland, the territory of which became a safe haven for different counterrevolutionary organisations. It is possible to even talk about an invisible war between Finland and the Soviet Union although officially the countries had reached a peace agreement in 1920. This doctoral thesis examines how different White Russian intelligence and military organisations used the territory of Finland for counterrevolutionary activities between 1918 and 1939. It also discusses the relations of the Finnish Security Police and the Military Intelligence of the General Staff with the underground organisations and the attitude of Finnish authorities towards their illegal activities. No comprehensive research has previously been made on these activities. Nor have the groups operating in Finland been formerly examined in a broader international context. Research on these movements and their operations in Finland has therefore remained fragmented and unconnected with the broader picture of the anti-Bolshevistic activity in Russia and the whole of Europe. One of the main conclusions of this thesis is that the territory of Finland served as a significant base for counterrevolutionary operations. Between 1918 and 1939, White Russian emigrants organised intelligence operations and even terrorist attacks against the Soviet Union from the territory of Finland. These events resulted from the previous history of the country and its geopolitical location close to Leningrad and Moscow as well as from the traditions of Finnish activism. This thesis also shows that the White Russian emigrant organisations were closely linked with Finnish security authorities. Arranging terrorist and intelligence operations against the Soviet Union would have been almost impossible without their active or at least passive support. The General Staff, in particular, and the Finnish Security Police to a certain extent, were ready to tolerate and even support the secret activities of White Russian emigrants under certain conditions. This resulted from their desire to affect the developments in the Soviet Union but also from the great demand for intelligence on the neighbouring country. Without close cooperation with the emigrant organisations this would have been difficult to achieve. Such cooperation was a major risk for Finland and its relations with the Soviet Union. From time to time it might even have brought the countries onto the verge of a military conflict. Soviet propaganda used the support of Finnish authorities to emigrant activists involved in terrorist attack plans to harm the reputation of Finland and to justify the shift towards an increasingly totalitarian system.
  • Kupari, Helena (2015)
    This study examines the lived religion of elderly Finnish Orthodox Christian women in present-day Finland. It discusses the women s everyday religious practice within the domestic environment. Furthermore, it also traces the ways in which their religion had been affected by their life histories, the changing status of the Orthodox community, and the modernization of Finnish society in the course of the 20th century. The primary research material for this study consists of interviews of 24 women. Finland is a Lutheran-dominated country; today, about one percent of Finns belong to the Orthodox Church. Traditionally, most of the Orthodox resided in Finnish Karelia. After the Second World War, Finland had to cede large areas of Karelia to the Soviet Union. In the process, two thirds of the Finnish Orthodox lost their homelands. All the interviewees, or their parents, had been among the evacuees from Karelia. The theoretical-methodological approach made use of in the study is based on practice theory. In particular, the concept of habitus as developed by the sociologist Pierre Bourdieu is applied to analyze the women s interview accounts. The concept captures Bourdieu s understanding of the reciprocal dynamic between practice, subjectivity, and structures of power. The analysis demonstrates that the interviewees religion was characterized by a movement between routine and reflexive action. Judging from the material, they mostly did religion in a habitual fashion. Nevertheless, they could also perform their practices more intentionally, to reinforce their identity against specific others. These two aspects of the women s religion are traced, respectively, to their childhood religious socialization and their social trajectories as minority religious practitioners in Finnish society. Ultimately, the analysis forms an account of the women s religion as habitus. The informants religious habitus constituted an embodied and practical sense of religion, which informed both their routine religious practices and more conscious and creative religious actions. This study provides a description and a theoretical representation of one particular style of contemporary religiosity: the lifelong religion of older lay women. Within recent scholarship on religion, the religion of women of the inter-war generation has not received much attention. This study, moreover, offers a reading of Bourdieuan social theory as applied to the lived religion of minority practitioners. As such, it illustrates the explanatory potential that a Bourdieuan approach can bring to analyses of relatively stable religion.
  • Savolainen, Ulla (Suomen Kansantietouden Tutkijain Seura, 2015)
    As a result of the Winter War (1939 1940) and the Continuation War (1941 1944), Finland ceded territories of Karelia to the Soviet Union. There was a Finnish population of over 400,000 people living in the ceded area at that time, and this population was evacuated to the Finnish side of the new border. The evacuation generated narratives about the evacuation journey. Later on, the evacuation journey has itself become a symbol enriched with meanings, a symbol that seems to characterize memories and reminiscences of Karelian evacuees more than any other theme. The research of the present thesis explores the poetics and rhetorical techniques of reminiscence writings about childhood evacuation journeys. The methodological foundation of the research combines theories of folkloristics, oral history research and narrative research. Memories and reminiscences are a fascinating area to explore because they are, according to the approach used here, the contemporary, personal and also narrative interpretations given to the past as well as rendering the significance the individuals assigned to it. Accordingly, the topic of this research is not so much childhood as it was in the past but childhood as it is formulated in writings at the moment of reminiscing. In the case of former Karelian child evacuees, both childhood and the childhood home are remote in time and in space. Narrative reminiscing operates as a tool for handling and crossing this distance. It is a means of creating and analyzing the relationship between the past, the present and the future. The research reveals three narrative strategies: 1. Truth and history oriented narrative strategy 2. Reflexive narrative strategy 3. Literary narrative strategy These strategies are illustrated through three different ways of how writers describe the evacuation journey. Strategies are also characterized by certain kinds of intertextual connections on the one hand and the writer s different ways of handling time in narration on the other. These narrative strategies are emblematic of the goals and intentions of the individual writers, and their investigation produces an outline of the genre of reminiscence writings. In evacuation journey writings, memories tend to interconnect with concrete points of reference, such as objects, documents, places, bodily experiences or crystallized narratives. In this research, these points are defined as sites of memory. Sites of memory testify, authenticate and reassert the link between the past, the present and the future. The research indicates that in reminiscence writings, sites of memory appear as points for the condensation of memories from different times, which in narration are manifested as temporal leaps and expansions of the plot into several overlapping levels of chronology. In addition, the research explores the significance attached to food and social relations in the writings. Central topics are children s reliance on their parents, their role within the family and peer group, and the dependence of the evacuees on other people s help and benevolence. The research shows that negotiations relating to social and power relations interconnect with more general ethical discourses understandings of right and wrong, good and bad which illustrate a writer s comprehensive experiences of losing his or her home and being an evacuee.
  • Walta, Ville (2014)
    This study is concerned with the libraries, manuscripts and book culture of the Birgittine Vadstena Abbey. It offers a case study of a large late medieval monastic library in Sweden and examines the book acquisition, manuscript production and the contents of Vadstena Abbey s libraries. The study demonstrates that the libraries were fashioned after European models and that book importation played a large role in book acquisition throughout the abbey s history. The study also argues that the differences in the contents, palaeography and codicology of the manuscripts testify to the differences in the book cultures of the abbey s two convents. Vadstena manuscripts form the principal source material for the study. The source corpus is taken into account more extensively than in previous studies. In addition to the entire manuscript collection, the study includes manuscript fragments and the abbey s correspondence. The manuscripts are presented in Appendix 1 and examined using methodology adopted from quantative codicology. This makes it possible to comprehensively study the Vadstena manuscript production. The study also challenges some nationalistic claims concerning the special nature of the Vadstena manuscripts that have been made based on a smaller sample of material. In chapters 2, 3 and 5, the organisation, acquisition and contents of the Vadstena collection are examined, and several similarities to other collections are pointed out. The abbey employed various methods of book acquisition, including organised visits to the European book markets, and quickly adopted new innovations such as the use of paper as writing material and the printing press. Most of the writing done in the abbey was based on texts popular throughout Europe. The same is true for the sisters library; although their manuscripts were produced locally and written in Swedish, they often include translations of widely popular texts. Chapter 4 examines the palaeography and codicology of the manuscripts. I argue that the palaeography and codicology of the manuscripts show that the two convents approached the book as an object in different ways. Whereas for the brothers the manuscripts were objects necessary for performing their daily tasks, for the sisters the manuscripts had a more profound meaning. They saw writing as a useful ascetic exercise as a prayer conducted with the hands instead of the mouth. Since the books served as devotional objects, it was also important to place more care into their making and materials. This explains why the liturgical books and the books of the sisters are usually written on parchment and carefully decorated, while the brothers books are often on paper and lack decorations. The manuscripts of Vadstena Abbey show that a single uniform Birgittine book culture did not exist. The abbey rather served as the intersection of two different approaches to literacy and manuscript production.
  • Yliaska, Ville (Into Kustannus, 2014)
    This study explores the birth and development of marketisation of the public sector in Finland since the 1970s. These quasi-market reforms were labeled New Public Management (NPM) in the 1990s. The main idea of NPM was to introduce competition and result-oriented management into the public sector. The main focus falls on three different reforms: the management-by-results reform, state subsidy reform and the incorporation and privatization of public agencies. The research falls at the intersection of political and administrational history. The analysis is based primarily on archival sources, press debates and publications that deal with the marketisation of the public sector. The main questions are: how were the reforms justified and how it was possible to maintain the wave of reform for decades without any feedback about the economic impacts of the reforms? The study begins with the history of the welfare state and with the criticism that the welfare state encountered from different directions in the wake of the oil crisis of the 1970s. The study shows that New Public Management was one of the turning points where ideas about democratisation, decentralisation, conservancy and decommodification of work born in the 1960s and mid-1970s gave way to the centralisation, recommodification and marketisation of structures in the public sector. The study also shows that by 1980s and 1990s power over public resources in Finnish society was centralised from local to central government through doctrines of New Public Management, which separated operational and strategic power in order to reallocate public resources from welfare services to industrial policy. This power shift is analysed in the context of the recession of the 1970s, which was interpreted at the time as an overproduction crisis. The main justification of the NPM reforms – “decentralization” – is analysed from different angles, but the main focus is on the methods of conceptual history. The political battle over the meaning of the concept “decentralisation”, which had a pleasant connotation, was an important factor in defining the results of the reforms. The findings of the study align with the recent interpretations of the political and economic history of other European countries where structural reforms have also led to the centralisation of power from local government to the central government and especially to the treasury.