Faculty of Social Sciences

 

Recent Submissions

  • Koskimies, Emanuela (Unigrafia, 2020)
    This doctoral dissertation investigates the development of the norm of sovereignty as responsibility by focusing on its institutionalization in the framework of the International Criminal Court (ICC). Prominent observers have regarded the emergence of a new norm of sovereignty as responsibility as one of the most significant normative shifts in international society since the aftermath of World War II. Against this backdrop, accounts have proliferated situating the ICC at the cutting edge of normative change. The present study critically engages with the whole set of theoretical foundations underlying this view, including the conventional constructivist understanding of norm development upon which the latter is premised. This, on the one hand, emphasizes the importance of norm institutionalization within “tangible” sets of rules or organizations. On the other, it understands institutionalization itself as a moment of clarity and stabilization, thus largely reducing it to an end-point of the norm emergence process. In other words, norm institutionalization is confined to a positivist view in which institutions fall back to the role of neutral fora. The result is a linear, static, and largely depoliticized account of norm content, which, while yielding to the traditional lack of communication between normative and empirical studies, ends up reiterating a dichotomic and simplistic view in which norms are scripts of emancipation, and power a practice of domination. The dissertation aims to unravel this dilemma altogether by offering a step forward in the development of a post-positivist constructivist approach. In other words, it takes a genuinely trans-disciplinary perspective and delves into the configuration of normativity as part of institutional practice, paying special attention to how the relative power of relevant actors reconstitutes norms during norm negotiation and implementation. Hence, the study unfolds from an unusual location – at the intersection between normative international theory and the politics of international criminal law; and from there, it seeks to revive discussions about the power-laden nature of the normative fabric of international society, its own dis-symmetries, and its outright hierarchies. To this end, the dissertation asks two major sequential questions: how the overarching system negotiated by states at the Rome Conference affects the selection of situations and cases before the ICC and their outcomes; and how the selection of situations and cases and their outcomes, in turn, “feeds back” to the norm of sovereignty institutionalized through the Court’s practice. The resulting analysis shows the following. While the Rome Statute reflects the persistence of the state as the primary site of political authority and coercion, it also cuts against the normative aspirations of sovereignty as responsibility by leaving the Court specifically ill-equipped to break with a notorious pattern of hyper-protected sovereignty. Outstanding issues such as the ICC’s selectivity and African bias, as well as the Court’s future prospects, are then reconsidered under this light. Those findings are then discussed in the final part of the study. Focusing on questions of delegation to international institutions, this ends with a note of caution. It concludes that the prospects of sovereignty as responsibility, as well as the broader discussion about cosmopolitan governance, lie more with the re-politicization of the debate than a straightforward invocation of greater forms of supranat
  • Kuosmanen, Isa (2020)
    This dissertation is a collection of three empirical essays on the economics of immigration and education. In the first chapter of this dissertation, I will introduce the topics and methods, cover key literature, and summarize the main findings from all three essays. In Chapter 2, we study the labor market consequences of opening borders by using the eastern enlargement of the European Union as a natural experiment. In our identification strategy, we use the fact that the eastern enlargement of the EU exposed construction workers in some occupations and regions differentially to the influx of foreign labor. We find that opening borders to workers from the new EU countries decreased annual earnings of workers in vulnerable occupations relative to less vulnerable workers. This drop in earnings is economically meaningful and these workers never seem to catch up with the less vulnerable individuals after opening of the borders. Although we do find that vulnerable workers were slightly more likely to be unemployed, this does not fully explain the drop in earnings. We additionally investigate heterogeneity by age as well as adjustment mechanisms. The negative effect on earnings is driven by younger workers, who became more likely to switch to other sectors of employment and establishments of work, and older workers, who became more likely to retire. In Chapter 3, we study the overall effects of a reform that introduced choice between public schools to the comprehensive education system in Finland. Our identification strategy exploits variation in school choice opportunities across municipalities before and after the school choice reform. The idea is that the reform was more intense in municipalities with multiple schools, as there were more opportunities to exercise choice. We find that students from all household income groups made choices after the reform. The introduction of school choice had on average a positive effect on students’ education and labor market outcomes. However, we find that the benefits of school choice were unequally distributed. Students from higher income households benefited from school choice, as they experienced improvements in their GPA and were more likely to get a high school education. These short-term gains also translated in to improvements in long-term education outcomes. Despite that students from lower income households were as likely to exercise school choice, they did not experience improvements in short-term education outcomes and were less likely to get a higher education later in life. These results are potentially explained by students from higher income households attending schools and classes with higher average attainment after the reform. We also document heterogeneity in selection into education and occupation later in life. In Chapter 4, I study the effects of public school choice on segregation of schools, residential segregation, and classroom-level segregation. I use the same reform and identification as Chapter 3. I find that school choice increased segregation of schools both by ability and household characteristics. On the contrary, I find no robust evidence that choice would have had an impact on residential segregation. Lastly, my results show that students from different ability and household characteristics were less likely to meet in a classroom after the introduction of school choice. I additionally document that this results is not only driven by increased sorting to schools, but that student sorting to classrooms within the schools also increased.
  • Koskimies, Emanuela (Helsingin yliopisto, 2020)
    This doctoral dissertation investigates the development of the norm of sovereignty as responsibility by focusing on its institutionalization in the framework of the International Criminal Court (ICC). Prominent observers have regarded the emergence of a new norm of sovereignty as responsibility as one of the most significant normative shifts in international society since the aftermath of World War II. Against this backdrop, accounts have proliferated situating the ICC at the cutting edge of normative change. The present study critically engages with the whole set of theoretical foundations underlying this view, including the conventional constructivist understanding of norm development upon which the latter is premised. This, on the one hand, emphasizes the importance of norm institutionalization within “tangible” sets of rules or organizations. On the other, it understands institutionalization itself as a moment of clarity and stabilization, thus largely reducing it to an end-point of the norm emergence process. In other words, norm institutionalization is confined to a positivist view in which institutions fall back to the role of neutral fora. The result is a linear, static, and largely depoliticized account of norm content, which, while yielding to the traditional lack of communication between normative and empirical studies, ends up reiterating a dichotomic and simplistic view in which norms are scripts of emancipation, and power a practice of domination. The dissertation aims to unravel this dilemma altogether by offering a step forward in the development of a post-positivist constructivist approach. In other words, it takes a genuinely trans-disciplinary perspective and delves into the configuration of normativity as part of institutional practice, paying special attention to how the relative power of relevant actors reconstitutes norms during norm negotiation and implementation. Hence, the study unfolds from an unusual location – at the intersection between normative international theory and the politics of international criminal law; and from there, it seeks to revive discussions about the power-laden nature of the normative fabric of international society, its own dis-symmetries, and its outright hierarchies. To this end, the dissertation asks two major sequential questions: how the overarching system negotiated by states at the Rome Conference affects the selection of situations and cases before the ICC and their outcomes; and how the selection of situations and cases and their outcomes, in turn, “feeds back” to the norm of sovereignty institutionalized through the Court’s practice. The resulting analysis shows the following. While the Rome Statute reflects the persistence of the state as the primary site of political authority and coercion, it also cuts against the normative aspirations of sovereignty as responsibility by leaving the Court specifically ill-equipped to break with a notorious pattern of hyper-protected sovereignty. Outstanding issues such as the ICC’s selectivity and African bias, as well as the Court’s future prospects, are then reconsidered under this light. Those findings are then discussed in the final part of the study. Focusing on questions of delegation to international institutions, this ends with a note of caution. It concludes that the prospects of sovereignty as responsibility, as well as the broader discussion about cosmopolitan governance, lie more with the re-politicization of the debate than a straightforward invocation of greater forms of supranationalism.
  • Kärrylä, Ilkka (Valtiotieteellinen tiedekunta, 2019)
    This study analyzes the contested and changing relation of democracy and the economy in Finnish and Swedish political thought and rhetoric from the 1960s until the 1990s. More specifically, it investigates how composite concepts such as ‘economic democracy,’ ‘industrial democracy’ and ‘enterprise democracy’ have been used in past political debates, what kinds of beliefs and concrete practices they have been related to, how they have been legitimized and criticized, and how their role has changed in political thought and rhetoric. The study utilizes theories and methods of conceptual history, combined with a broader approach to ‘history of thought.’ Concepts are analyzed as parts of semantic fields or ideational constellations, where their meaning, reference and valuation are shaped in relation to other concepts and beliefs. These constellations are reproduced, challenged and changed in everyday language use. The study’s empirical focus in Sweden and Finland allows contrasting political thought and the use of concepts as well as reflecting on possible conceptual transfers. The source material consists of books, articles and governmental documents dealing with economic and industrial democracy. Special attention is paid to the programs, manifestos and statements of political parties and labor market organizations. The main focus is on Social Democrats and Conservatives, as well as employer and trade union confederations. For most of the 20th century, ‘economic democracy’ was a key political concept in Finland and Sweden. Most groups agreed on the goal of giving citizens more power over economic decisions, but the concrete meaning of economic democracy was deeply contested. For the left, the concept meant societal planning and steering of the economy, as well as the power of employees in the workplace. For the right, economic democracy referred to the dispersion of private ownership to wider ranks of people, and consultative cooperation between employees and employers. In the 1990s, economic democracy practically vanished from the Finnish and Swedish political language. This is explained with dilemmas, such as economic crises, which challenged the existing beliefs and concepts of historical agents. Instead of democratization, national economies were to be liberalized and marketized in order to survive in global competition. In the new world of free capital flows, old ideas of economic democracy were set aside from mainstream political rhetoric. For advocates of the free market economy, it was safer to emphasize people’s economic role as free consumers and to separate this from their role as democratic citizens in the political sphere.
  • Bärlund, Katariina (Helsingin yliopisto, 2019)
    Katariina Bärlund: Homicides, attempted homicides and violence by mothers of under one-year-olds’ as portrayed in forensic psychiatric examinations. A narrative study. Filicides (child killing by parents) have decreased remarkably in Finland during the past decades. Despite the decrease in numbers, Finnish children still end up as victims of filicides and violent abuse by parents. The present research investigated forensic psychiatric examinations of mothers who targeted their children with filicide, attempted filicide or violence during the child’s first year of life. The research approached this phenomenon by asking what kind of narratives the events in the examinations gave rise to. The theoretical foundations of the research focused on motherhood, evil, violence, and homicides. Motherhood was seen as part of a cultural understanding of motherhood and evil was considered as a human dimension. The mission of the research was to investigate filicides, attempted filicides and violent acts of mothers towards their children from the point of view of social science, to form a picture of the events that includes the circumstances, and to illuminate the events narratively. The research approached the uncovered areas of social work research: filicide by mothers and the thematic of evil. The research material included forensic psychiatric examinations and the sample narratives written on the basis of these cases. Reading these narratives, it must be noted that they do not concern individual cases but are a mixture of different cases within the material and include only rough descriptions as interpreted by the researcher. The research was based on documents and thus does not reach the authentic viewpoint of mothers or their inner social circle. The research produced two sample narratives, the story of a mother who killed her newborn baby (neonaticide) and the story of a mother who killed her under one year old baby (infanticide). Comparing these narratives produced a clear result as the narratives differed from each other. The first narrative was named as “Concealed Story “ and the second as “Fractured Story”. The present research reinforced the view of filicide and violence towards children as complex event where the parents’ differing degrees of inability in responding to life’s challenges can be seen. The research produced a need to research the subject further, especially from the viewpoints of loneliness and multiprofessional co-operation. Keywords: motherhood, homicides, violence, evil, evilness, narrative research
  • Junnilainen, Lotta (Vastapaino, 2019)
    This PhD thesis is an ethnographic study on social life in two public housing neighborhoods. It is a story from the inside, describing residents´ experiences of community and belonging as social practices. As such, it aims at challenging the one-dimensional approaches representing public housing neighborhoods as problem neighborhoods in need of correction. The research also shows how outsiders prejudices and preconceptions are not only related to these places and neighbourhoods, but also towards the people living in them. The research is based on ethnographic fieldwork conducted in two post-WWII housing estates built in the 1960s and 1970s located in two of the biggest cities in Finland. The areas were originally built for working-class families, but have since become neighborhoods of concentrated disadvantage and unemployment. For five years (2012-2016), I collected data on the social networks, residents´ everyday practices and interactions, their relations to local institutions, as well as narratives guiding their understanding of who they are and what their neighbourhood is. In addition, I used media archives for chasing the processes of stigmatization in public narratives that have made the areas “problem neighborhoods” of today. The data describes neighbourhood life in which social class is not an articulated identification, but an everyday experience manifesting in collective memory, place attachment, solidarity and misrecognition. The empirical contribution of the thesis lies in micro-level description of urban bonds, place-making and practices of community – such as story-telling, neighboring, gossiping, collective nostalgia and boundary making. The analysis of interaction between the residents and outsiders also highlights the processes, where the good and sincere intentions of individuals can end up renewing and strengthening forms of social inequality as an unintended consequence of their actions. Theoretically, the research builds on urban sociological theories and approaches that until now have been less applied to the Finnish context. Traditionally, urban scholars have approached neighborhoods of concentrated disadvantage either as “communal villages” based on strong social ties or “problem neighborhoods” of isolation and social disorganization. However, neither of these descriptions characterized the neighborhoods of this research. Instead, built through the everyday practices of local life, the residents were able to form and maintain patterns of mutual recognition, as well as a sense of belonging – all without the requirement of the close social ties usually related to the traditional idea of village life. For almost half a century outsiders from politicians to urban planners have tried to fix the neighbourhoods of my research by making their inhabitants more active and communal. The communality resulting from the social practices of the areas has not been recognized due to its´ failures to resemble the middle-class ideals of communal life. This PhD is a micro-level description of the paradox of communality and the power to define what type of communality and solidarity is preferred and welcome in society. Now at the turn of the decade Finland is not faced with problem neighborhoods, but rather a neighborhood problem reflecting first and foremost the middle-class presumptions concerning the types of people living in certain areas of the country.
  • Frisk, Matleena (Nuorisotutkimusverkosto/Nuorisotutkimusseura, 2019)
    This study investigates norms of young femaleness and maleness, from the perspective of consumer products and ideals concerning the body. The context of the study is the major increase in Finnish private consumption and change in views related to sexuality that took place during the 1960s and early 1970s. The study focuses on the gender perspective in the history of everyday life structured by consumption. The research subject is delineated using a concept, intimate bodily consumer products, which refers to products that are used to process the body in an intimate way. The study asks what connections there are between the use of intimate bodily consumer products and the norms of bodily young femaleness and maleness in the commercial popular culture directed at young people in Finland in the 1960s and at the beginning of the 1970s. The key source in the study is the widely read youth music magazine Suosikki, especially the advertisements in the magazine. The analysis is contextualized by utilizing household surveys and collections of oral history data. In the first part, the study analyses the norms that could be found in the Suosikki magazine regarding girls and boys, dating and sexuality. An ideal relationship emphasised being alike and belonging together, and the ideal couple often referred to themselves as ‘we’. In this research, this is characterised with the concept of we-ness. Though the magazine had portrayed itself ever since the end of the 1960s as having a modern, non-moralising attitude to sexuality, the issue of a girl’s sexual reputation continued to be evident in the articles of Suosikki. However, the girl’s sexual agency was given space within the ideal relationship characterised by we-ness. The latter part of the study takes a closer look at the way in which the intimate bodily products and their use were woven into the understanding of gender. Two cases are analysed: young men adopting the use of deodorant and the change in the type of menstrual products used by young women. In the early 1960s, deodorant was considered to be a feminine fragrance and first started to be used on a wider scale when both the understanding of young maleness and the meaning of deodorant as a product changed. The study of disposable menstrual products, on the other hand, focuses attention on the availability of products and rising living standards. The ideal of we-ness as well as changed attitudes to pre-marital sex were reflected in advertising: Advertisements for products related to especially a girl’s body often referred to dating and sexual relationships. The ideal body was constructed with the advertised products, but was represented as natural.
  • Samonova, Elena (University of Helsinki, 2018)
    Slavery and slavery like practices have many faces and forms. This thesis aims to investigate one of the most widespread forms of slavery, namely bonded labour. Bonded labour is an exploitative interlinking of credit agreement and labour, where a debtor has to repay his debt through long term servitude. In this thesis, I focus on two cases of bonded labour in agriculture: debt bondage among Tharu people in Nepal and Sahariya people in India. In both cases the establishment of systems of bonded labour is connected to the long term processes of internal colonization, dispossession, nationalization of natural resources, and the introduction of private land ownership. The overall goal of the thesis is to find out in what way the full liberation of bonded labourers is possible. In particular, I investigate the effects associated with the implementation of the human rights-based approaches to bonded labour. Thus, the research questions are: What are the factors and forces that contribute and reinforce the situation of bonded labour? And in what manner does the application of a rights-based approach affect the liberation of those oppressed groups who experience debt-bondage? In order to answer this research question, I apply qualitative methods of inquiry, including in-depth interviews and group discussions. The data were gathered during three field trips that took place between November 2015 and December 2016. The translation of the situation of bonded labour into the language of power relations demonstrates that bondage is a situation of multiple powerlessness, where various forms and levels of power block the agency of people held in bondage. Thus, the situation of bondage can be seen as a situation of objectification and de-humanization of people. The full liberation of bonded labourers means reconstitution of power relations in favour of people held in bondage. The analysis shows that legislation alone cannot eliminate the practice of bondage, since it does not challenge the deep rooted causes of power imbalance. In turn, the analysis of the implementation of the human rights-based approaches demonstrates their capacity to contribute to the successful deconstruction of internalized oppression, and re-establishment of subject status among the community. In this way, the implementation of the human rights-based approach contributes to the process of re-humanization that is required for the deconstruction of the oppressive social relations. Additionally, the rights-based approaches support the opening of old and the creation of new participatory spaces, the development of new behaviour patterns, and changes in social expectations and social norms. Thus, these approaches reduce the risks of a return to bonded labour. The analysis demonstrates that the absolute majority of identified changes takes place at the personal and community level, while macro levels of power remain barely addressed. That is why it can be argued that deep structural powers that produce and re-produce social exclusion are still intact. Thus, the situation of freed bonded labours in India and Nepal can be called unfinished liberation, which means that the communities of (ex) bonded labourers are still located at the bottom of the hierarchy of social life.
  • Kuukkanen, Mari (Helsingin yliopisto, 2018)
    This study examines the means and ends of the Finnish anarchist movement in the early 2010s. The data consists of ethnographic field notes on various anarchist events, 12 semi-structured interviews and published material from anarchist media outlets. The data is analyzed through three conceptual lenses. First, what kinds of cultural repertoires were available and preferable for the anarchists will be studied. Second, the role of the movement’s collective identity in the coordination of anarchist action is also scrutinized. Third, the study explores what kinds of strategic dilemmas emerged for anarchists and how they were solved. Thus, on one hand, the study aims to analyze movement culture by examining both ‘external’ (repertoires) and ‘internal’ (collective identity) culture and their interplay. On the other hand, cultural analysis is combined with a focus on strategy. The premise is that cultural factors always affect activists’ strategic reasoning. The analysis shows that during the research period, great emphasis was placed on forging a distinctive collective identity for anarchists. Through boundary drawing, central movement actors strived to disassociate anarchism from both leftism in general and the moderate, reform-oriented and expert-driven civic activism, which dominates Finnish civil society. The identity-building effort was mirrored in the preference for characteristically anarchist political practices: prefiguring alternatives to the current social order and rebelling, even with destructive means, against it. However, the embeddedness of the Finnish anarchist movement in the social movement field and the activist networks means that anarchists often act politically in a similar manner to other, less rebellious activists. The fear of being obscured in the midst of ‘regular’ activism fueled the aforementioned boundary drawing. This positioning in relation to other activists contributes to the movement’s relative moderateness as well: in Finland presenting itself as the radical alternative can be achieved by fairly modest means. In the given period, the main strategic dilemmas faced by the movement were so-called ‘resonance or radicalism’ and extension dilemmas. As for the first, although the preference was on radicalism, anarchists occasionally used their strategic capacity for intentionally choosing more culturally resonant means. However, this balancing act was strenuous, and it was reflected in the extension dilemma as well. The anarchists studied found it difficult to answer who constituted the movement’s constituency and for whom mobilization efforts were addressed. Although, in theory, anarchists pursue the self-rule of the ‘people’, in practice, the bond the anarchists in this study prefigured was predominantly that of the ‘chosen few’ whose solidarity was based on a common struggle and shared countercultural values and aesthetics.
  • Hormio, Säde (Helsingin yliopisto, 2017)
    The topic of my thesis is individual and collective responsibility for collectively caused systemic harms, with climate change as the case study. Can an individual be responsible for these harms, and if so, how? Furthermore, what does it mean to say that a collective is responsible? A related question, and the second main theme, is how ignorance and knowledge affect our responsibility. My aim is to show that despite the various complexities involved, an individual can have responsibility to address climate change. I argue that climate change is not a problem just for states and international bodies, but also for individuals. There are three possible sources of moral responsibility for individuals in relation to climate change harms: direct responsibility (individuals qua individuals), shared responsibility as members (individuals qua members of collective agents), and shared responsibility as constituents (individuals qua constituents of unorganised collectives). Accounts that deny individual responsibility fail to either take our interdependent reality seriously or fail to understand marginal participation (or in the case direct responsibility, fail to appreciate the nature of the climate change phenomenon). Individuals can be complicit in climate change harms, either as members of collective agents (e.g. as citizens of states or employees of a corporation) or as constituents of unorganised collectives (e.g. as consumers or polluters). Although I focus on individual complicity, I do not deny the obligations of collective agents. However, nation-states, governments, and international bodies are not the only relevant collective agents in climate ethics: other collective agents, such as corporations, matter also and can have obligations concerning making sure that their activities are as carbon-neutral as possible. In addition, those corporations that have engaged in lobbying against climate regulation through creating and disseminating misleading information have acquired themselves additional obligations to mitigate climate change and compensate for the harm they have caused. Even so, the ethical claims can only be understood by individual members of these collective agents because only they can feel the pull of moral claims. I suggest that we could distinguish between what one must possess in order to be capable of making moral claims (i.e. moral agency conditions), and what it means to have the ability to exhibit such claims through one’s conduct. Individual direct responsibility is to not to increase the probable risk of serious harm to other people, at least as long as we can do so at a less than significant cost to ourselves. It is limited to relatively wealthy individuals. Offsetting is not a reliable way to meet this duty; we need to look at the emissions from our lifestyle choices (within the available infrastructure). Shared responsibility qua members of collective agents is the key individual responsibility, and it presses especially on those occupying key positions within key collective agents. Saying that, our shared responsibility qua constituents of unorganised collectives has the potential to be decisive in whether some action is taken or not, either through a set of actions that can signal certain acceptance or support, or as a form of political support from the grass roots.
  • Alava, Henni (Helsingin yliopisto, 2017)
    This study explores how the Catholic and Protestant (Anglican) Churches have influenced the negotiation of societal co-existence in the aftermath of over two decades of brutal war in northern Uganda. Drawing from a total of nine months of ethnographic fieldwork between 2012 and 2016 that focused on a Catholic and a Protestant parish in Kitgum town, this study provides a historically grounded ethnographic analysis of the relationship between mainline churches and politics in Acholiland. It argues that churches, as socially, politically, and materially embedded institutions, have performed as sites of, and provided individuals and communities resources for, narrative imagination. The two churches were at the forefront of the Acholi Religious Leaders’ Peace Initiative (ARLPI), which gained global acclaim and local respect for its efforts to draw the international community’s attention to the war, and to convince the warring parties to embark on peace talks. Yet the churches, which have been deeply entangled in Ugandan politics since the country's independence, were themselves hard-hit by the war and, as this study shows, their political and societal role in its aftermath has been complex. First, rather than being the monolithic actors they are often perceived to be, churches are deeply woven into networks of ethnicity, kinship, party politics, government, patronage, and friendship, and the criss-crossing lines of division that cut across society also run through the churches themselves. Second, although public church events function as platforms for performances of statehood, they also provide arenas for genuine political debate and critique of Uganda’s ruling government. Third, while churches have taken part in forging a powerful and at times healing utopian vision of a peaceful future in post-war Acholiland, this utopia lends itself to entrenching boundaries of inclusion and exclusion, both within the churches, and within society. To make these claims, the study draws analytical tools from debates in the anthropology of hope and of the good, in political theology, in studies on political narratives and utopias, and in multidisciplinary research on Christianity and politics in Africa. The thread followed throughout is the Acholi concept of anyobanyoba, ‘confusion’, which emerges as both a sense of ambivalence and uncertainty, and as a state of affairs within a community. By analysing public church events at which elaborate political narratives are woven, as well as quotidian moments in which silence, fear, and hope are encountered and expressed, the study highlights how ‘confusion’ diminishes the possibilities of crafting hopeful imaginaries for a less violent future – yet also the multiple ways in which confusion and violence are addressed. The notion of confusion is also employed as an epistemological and ethical device. Acknowledging the challenges of studying violence and its aftermath; the futility of claims to absolute knowledge in situations characterised by uncertainty and silence; and the difficulty of transforming the experiences of others into text in an ethically uncompromised way; the study advocates scholarship that embraces hesitance and experimentation rather than certainty and disciplinary rigidity. In a world increasingly framed by oppositional extremes, there is a need for research that, instead of seeking clear-cut answers, asks questions that provoke recognition of complexity and confusion, and explores the ways in which communities and individuals orientate themselves towards the future in the face of them.
  • Pipatti, Otto (2017)
    This study offers an overall interpretation of the sociologist and anthropologist Edward Westermarck’s (1862–1939) moral and social theory. It focuses on the key elements of Westermarck’s theory of moral emotions as presented in The Origin and Development of the Moral Ideas (1906-08) and summarized in Ethical Relativity (1932), and examines the importance of his work for understanding and explaining a wide range of social and moral phenomena that may be observed in all social environments. The study has two main aims. First, it lays out the key features of Westermarck’s theory of moral judgement, the nature of retributive emotions in which moral judgements are based, and the various psychological and social elements influencing them. At the same time, it shows that Westermarck’s account of morality is an ambitious and wide-ranging analysis of the fundamentals of human social behaviour and social reality. By combining the moral-psychological and sociological aspects of Westermarck’s work, the study reconstructs his understanding of emotions, and the different forms of emotional contagion in particular, as the fundamental elements of human sociality. What emerges is that at the heart of Westermarck’s theory-building is his neglected account of sympathy, proving to be crucial to his understanding of morality and human social life. The second aim of this study is to examine Westermarck’s thought in the context of his main sources of inspiration, enabling a better understanding of his work. In this regard, it highlights the importance of Darwinian evolutionism to the different aspects of Westermarck’s project, especially to his approach to the human mind. In addition, the study demonstrates how Westermarck’s theory of moral emotions developed out of, and in response to, David Hume’s and Adam Smith’s moral philosophy, combining their views on human nature, moral sentiments, and sympathy with Darwinian evolutionary thinking. The first part of this work focuses on the central elements in Westermarck’s moral and social theory, especially with respect to the nature of moral emotions, the role of sympathy and society, reciprocity, the emergence and maintenance of moral norms, and moral responsibility. The remaining part of the study expands upon and deepens these discussions by looking at Westermarck’s theory of moral emotions in relation to the sentimentalist tradition in British moral philosophy, whose importance Westermarck himself emphasised as the background for his thinking. Today, his legacy serves as an example of sociological theory-building that is not organized around the dualisms of nature/culture and animal/human which penetrate much of the social sciences. The study demonstrates Westermarck’s sociological relevance and broadens the view of Westermarck as the forerunner of modern evolutionary approaches to morality.
  • Rajavuori, Anna (Työväen historian ja perinteen tutkimuksen seura, 2017)
    The politics of performance. Socialist agitation in the country side of central Finland in 1906–1908 The study examines oral agitation by the Finnish Social Democratic Party in the eastern electoral district of Vaasa before and after the first parliamentary elections. Research on political speeches is rather scarce, partly due to the fact that there are no recordings and only few manuscripts for these have survived. Agitation has usually been examined as a means to spread political viewpoints among the populace, and its success has been determined according to votes cast in elections. In this study agitation and events where this was performed are referenced through a performance theory viewpoint as bodily interaction. The performance is viewed as a lens, through which history, culture, and political and social reality manifests itself. The sources for this study include newspapers, oral history, historical documents and prose. These have been examined in relation to central issues within performance theory, namely identity, social roles and the possibilities of individuals. The study shows that socialist agitation was varied both in form and content. The nature of the performance was dictated by the audience. The performance of agitation borrowed from other types of performance of the era. The agitators made use of Christian rhetoric and their motives drew from the ideals of enlightenment. The central message of agitation, putting into words the class based society and class differences, could be made visible via performance. The agitator attempted to find conflict with the “bourgeoisie”, thus creating a clash between different social classes and a feeling of togetherness within their own. A key objective of agitation was creating a conscious working class identity based on the actions of an inner circle of actors. The study offers new perspectives into political action and the creation of political identity in a rural environment as part of the modernization process. Socialist agitators assisted the people in becoming political actors and strengthened their experience of participation and citizenship. In addition to political and social effects, agitation also had a profound cultural effect, because of the diverse nature of the gatherings, where it was performed. The viewpoint into political performance and the politics of performance offered in this study also presents a point of comparison into modern political culture. Keywords: agitation, agitators, labour movement, the Social Democratic Party of Finland, the 20th century, political performance, socialism, election campaign
  • Myllymaa, Antti (2017)
    This dissertation addresses the tripartite question concerning the relationship between a globalizing capitalist market economy, a territorial states system and a supranational European Union. Specifically, this study explains how different societal actors approach the question of the vertical division of competences between the supranational EU institutions and the Member States while juxtaposing this in the pursuit of desired models of socio-economic regulation. Whereas previous studies have paid attention to issues concerning the form of integration, this study seeks to contribute to more nuanced discussions concerning federalism by focusing on issues of content. It also challenges the view that economic globalization is an exogenous development arguing that what is understood as economic globalization can in fact be traced back to specific national policies that are enacted in order to facilitate the state s international competitiveness, thus making economic globalization an endogenous process. The empirical part of this dissertation addresses the emergence of a cross-border online gambling market in Europe. Although such a de facto market exists, its existence has not been recognized de jure by the European Union. This untenable situation results from EU Member States having diametrically opposing views concerning the legality of this market. In order to explain this development, this study takes a step back and asks how the cross-border online gambling market emerged in Europe. This study employs the process-tracing method in order to identify critical turning points that were necessary for the emergence of this market. It is argued that it was the neoliberal export-oriented competitiveness policies of the Malta and Gibraltar tax havens, enacted following the suggestions of the cross-border online gambling industry, which was a necessary condition for the emergence of the de facto market. The cross-border online gambling operators incorporation in Malta and Gibraltar guaranteed these operators access to the Single Market as they were protected by the fundamental freedoms enshrined in the EU Treaties. The successful business operations subsequently enabled interest representation for these operators and the ability to challenge the protectionist gambling regimes of Member States by making complaints to the EU Commission. As the Guardian of the Treaty, the EU Commission launched infringement proceedings against over a dozen Member States. Partially as a result of these infringement proceedings many Member States have opted for what is called controlled liberalization , thus allowing gambling to be organized for private profit. This nudges the socio-economic regulation of gambling towards neoliberalism. Several contrarian EU Member States, including Finland, are still strongly protectionist thus displaying their commitment to social democratic socio-economic regulation and have decided to fight the liberalization trend that has become prevalent in the field of gambling services. They have resisted the EU Commission s attempts to bring gambling into the Single Market program de jure. Gambling has been omitted from the EU s binding secondary legislation because of the resistance displayed by these protectionist Member States. This resistance has included bringing gambling issues to the EU Council, the EU s multilateral forum, so as to produce non-liberalizing EU level initiatives and regulation of gambling services. It is telling that those Member States, primarily Malta and the UK, who have championed the Single Market perspective for gambling, have fought against such developments. This study confirms the support of neoliberal societal actors for so-called negative EU integration, i.e., the dismantling of national barriers. The novelty of this study is to contribute to recent theoretical discussions by confirming, as these recent discussions have suggested, that following the transnationalization of business activities, social democratic societal actors would not only resist negative integration, but also work towards social democratic multilateralism, i.e., a specific form of so-called positive integration. This has been true in gambling services as was described above. However, this study also confirms the EU s bias towards negative integration, finding that the individual Member States policy space in regulating gambling services is being diminished due to the EU s fundamental freedoms and the EU Court s judge-made law. The protectionist Member States have had to resort to organized hypocrisy in order to protect the de facto socialized or nationalized means of production of gambling services in order to thwart the liberalization trend. Although the reasons for protection are in reality mostly financial, the EU Court and the EU Commission only accepts non-financial overriding public interest reasons for protection. As the stated reasons for protection of protectionist Member States are in fact hypocritical, this study finds that, although there are several potential futures, the most likely future scenario will be the slow neoliberalization of gambling services in the European Union with the sector s de jure inclusion in the Single Market program as the end result.
  • Haara, Heikki (2017)
    Samuel Pufendorf's (1632 1694) theory of sociability has lately become the subject of renewed interest among intellectual historians and philosophers. Nevertheless, its moral psychological underpinnings have not been explored thoroughly in their own right. The present work is the first study devoted to the role of passions and inclinations in Pufendorf's moral and political philosophy. It examines Pufendorf's scattered remarks and observations on human psychology and evaluates the moral psychological assumptions underlying his theory of human sociability. Pufendorf's acknowledgement of the limits of individual rationality and the fact that people are always deeply embedded in the social and moral practices of particular societies reduces the role of internal moral obligations in his account of moral action. The application of agent-focused morality is relatively limited because Pufendorf believes that, in a large-scale society, most individuals govern their moral behaviour primarily through habitually-acquired dispositions rather than conscientious internal motivations. The central argument of this study is that Pufendorf's natural law theory includes a mechanism by which social interaction, guided by political governance, habituates people to internalize moral norms and govern their passions and actions so as to maintain and cultivate sociability. Pufendorf's theory of sociability intriguingly combines two conficting approaches to morality. On the one hand, he is a natural law theorist who bases the obligation to cultivate sociability on the commands of God, which are recognised by reason. On the other hand, sociability is not merely a normative rule discovered by reason. It is trough the set of social practises that humans in practise adopt sociability as their moral standard. Though Pufendorf's main aim is to demonstrate what the divinely imposed universal natural law norms are, his numerous perceptive remarks and observations on moral conduct as an internalized product of society points towards to the moral-psychological emphasis on habits and passions as a mechanism of sociability that became so important for numerous eighteenth-century authors.
  • Kivelä, Juhani (Väittelijä, 2016)
    Abstract Silent alarm how incidents in society have been managed between 2012 and 2014 According to the government resolution on comprehensive security of 2012, situation snapshots are among of the most important bases of decision-making at all levels of operations. The resolution finds that preparedness arrangements related to Finnish security are well-functioning and do not require large-scale reforms; neither is there any reason to develop regulations related to specific procedures or incident management systems. In 2000s prior to 2010 and subsequently numerous regulatory and structural reforms applying to all security operators. The point of departure of the study was the researcher s view based on administrative experiences that the decision-makers lacked knowledge about the effects of reforms in the practical management of incidents. The aim of the study was to update the situation snapshot presented in the government resolution with the perspective of competent practical security operators. Incident management is a new concept and used as a sub-area of security management in government resolutions in the 2010s. The upper framework of the study is the framework of the management of overall security, which includes the security management of normal circumstances, incidents and war-time conditions. The main question posed by the study is: What did the state of incident management look like from the perspective of competent authorities after the administrative reforms and changes in the security environment that took place in the 2000s at the end of 2014? The empirical study focused on years 2012 2014. The study was a qualitative case study. The study object was selected as the macro and operative micro level of practical operations. At both levels, the aim was to gather comprehensive empirical data. In all 130 security operators were interviewed for the study. The micro level data comprises in all 79 interviews of emergency centre, rescue, police, border guard and municipal employees. These are supplemented by 11 regional level interviews with Regional State Administrative Agency and Centre for Economic Development, Transport and the Environment employees. The macro level interview data comprises 38 interviews with the management of ministries, central government and NGOs. The document sources at macro level comprise government programmes, government resolutions, committee reports, regulative and structural reform decisions made in the 2000s and investigation reports of crisis and incident situations experienced. The interpretation of the sources is based on theory-based content analysis, for the purpose of which a loose interpretative framework based on international research literature was created. Its strategic management analyses are derived from T.E. Drabek s strategic management roadmap as well as concepts belonging to L. Johnston and C. Shearing s management theory. Operative management criteria are based on concepts formulated by Johnson and Shearing, which have been supplemented with H. de Bruijn and E.F. ten Heuvelhof s hybrid management criteria. Finally, the study observations have been analysed from the perspective of Drabek s main concept related to incident situations; coordination. Based on the analyses performed, the answer to the main question of the study, can be summarised as follows: 1.From the perspective of the competent authorities, incident management during the study period was administratively disorganised. The view presented in the 2012 resolution about the functioning of the arrangements during normal circumstances did not correspond to the management demands in 2012, or at the end of 2014. 2. The state of management exhibited significant deficiencies in both the strategic management coordination capabilities at the end of 2014. The hierarchical and network management arrangements related to incidents did not correspond to the hybrid management requirements of the incidents. 3. During the study period, the threats related to incidents increased and their management became an increasingly important area of comprehensive security. The deficiencies found in the study also weakened the management preconditions of comprehensive security. The practical conclusion of the study is that the management of incidents and comprehensive security require significant corrective measures and reforms. Moreover, the study revealed that the necessary reforms do not require large additional resources; some of the corrective measures can be performed with existing resources and some by reallocating resources. Based on the study findings, it appears that the loose theoretical framework created for content analysis seemed to suit the object of study and the analysis of data collected for it. Keywords: Comprehensive security, incident management, coordination, strategic, operative, hierarchical, network and hybrid management
  • Virtanen, Mikko J. (Tutkijaliitto, 2015)
    The aim of this dissertation is to develop a systems theoretical framework for studying contemporary societal phenomena qualitatively. The development work is based on Niklas Luhmann s systems theoretical oeuvre, especially on Luhmann s view of modern society as social systems. Social systems are self-referential systems which use communication for producing communication. For Luhmannian theory of society, along with the general view of social systems as self-referential communication chains, societal differentiation is the key principle: there is no centre, core or top in modern society but societal subsystems, such as economy, politics, law and science, all of which are autonomous to each other. Moreover, interaction, organisation and subsystems are observed as different types of systems whose logics of communication chaining differ from each other. Drawing on these general ideas as well as later theoretical discussions and developments especially in German systems theoretical sociology, a theoretical outline of the general logics of contemporary society is formed. However, and in contrast to Luhmann s late work, the study at hand focuses on systems theoretical methodology instead of presenting a strong theory of modern society as such. With this aim of developing a methodological focus, the monograph discusses these issues also with other sociological traditions, such as Durkheimian theory of society, American pragmatism, Erving Goffman s methodological views, ethnomethodology and Bruno Latour s theory of networks and collectives. The methodological development work culminates in a qualitative research framework, named as a systems theoretical research template. Hence, the monograph joins a vibrant conversation in the social sciences about the theory research link and advances systems theoretical considerations about the current methodological issues. The research template is further utilized in a case study of the work of the (Finnish) National Advisory Board on Social Welfare and Health Care Ethics (ETENE) set up in 1998 under the Ministry of Social Affairs and Health. The ethnographic data, obtained through the observation of the board meetings, is analysed through the systems theoretical template in order to develop a two-part focus: to examine the practices of the board work as such as well as the role of the board in a wider, differentiated societal context. The ethics of the board meetings does not follow the principles of academic ethics but rather provides an opportunity for an open and polyphonic pondering on complex and burdensome issues. The function of ethics in the meetings is thus par excellence performative: to level the statuses of the participants and to make it possible for them to encounter each other as authentic and respectable persons with different views and opinions. The organisational procedures frame the board work for their part to a degree but there is also space for a less structurated and more open-ended debate. Consequently, the board seems to oscillate between a bureaucratic, decision-centred organisation and an open agora discussion and this ambivalence is also a guarantee for its dynamics and independence.
  • Kuronen, Tanja (Gaudeamus, 2015)
    The unloaders of the carebom is a study about carework for the home-dwelling elderly, using a method I call institutional autoethnography. The viewpoint stems from my own experiences in voluntary-based, semi-formal care work. Such work is organized in the so-called old third sector , helping the elderly in their domestic everyday chores, wherein the elderly themselves specify the chores needed. Care-workers are mainly women, working skills based on non-professional, (assumed) everyday skills. They receive a small benefit for their work, directly from the customers. Semi-formal care-work can offer accessible, affordable and attractive domestic help. It can also offer people with caring skills a way to use them for meaningful work and receive some benefit for it. However, the work has no legitimate role in the Finnish welfare-mix, where current trends mark a diminishing public sector and the rise marketization and familialism. The old third sector can offer no status in the labour market for the caretaker, and the small benefits do not offer sufficient subsistence. The caretaker faces expectations and demands that exceed the fact that the work is voluntary-based. The work can be described as grey care and a cash-in-hand job. During the next 25 years, the number of Finnish people over age 75 will double. All care-needers do not have access to market-based or family care. Labour market, however, does not see care as work; rather, care duties prevent people from working. On the contrary, from a necessary labor point of view, care-work is biology-based work that maintains life and is therefore one of the few tasks that necessarily needs to be done: Care is work par excellence. This contradiction is seen in the concept of voluntary work, the oxymoron that offers an unsatisfactory community-based solution to care problems, leaving the care-needers depending on other peoples voluntariness, and the care-workers lacking status or subsistence. In an ageing society it is urgent that care-work for the elderly be organized in a new way. Civil society work paid with civil salary, other benefits and the right to a pension, would offer semi-formal care-work a legitimate status in the labour market. In this new work, everyday skills would be given a new value, taught and utilized to offer everyday care for the elderly and other people who need care.
  • Poikolainen, Janne (Nuorisotutkimusverkosto/Nuorisotutkimusseura, 2015)
    The study introduces a historical perspective to the discussion on fandom by examining the emergence of popular music fan culture in Finland from the 1950s to early 1970s. The analysis focuses on the ways the forms and meanings of music fandom, as well as the images attributed to fans, developed in the interaction between the music industry, publicity and audience. The source material consists mainly of written reminiscences on popular music and fandom, and music magazines from the research period. The material also includes e.g. fan letters and statistics. The historical context of the analysis is comprised of the substantial changes in youth brought about by the post-war social change. In the study, these changes are referred to as the modernization of youth. The study examines the technological, social and cultural changes linked to the change in youth that facilitated the emergence of the fan culture. Secondly, the study identifies the socio-cultural needs, created by modernization, to which music fandom as a phenomenon responded. In terms of content, the analysis focuses on three dimensions of fan culture. The first dimension comprises the musical and material settings of fandom, such as recordings, concerts and music magazines. The second consists of media discourses concerning the fan phenomenon. Here the study also questions and disassembles the gendered stereotypes constructed within the discourses. The third dimension comprises the socio-cultural meanings of fandom, particularly in respect of identity work taking place in the forms of identification and social distinction. Scrutiny of these dimensions also highlights the links between the fan phenomenon and the constituent phenomena of modernizing youth: for example, the mediatization, Anglo-Americanization and sexualization of youth culture, as well as the weakening of the traditional identity models. The study shows that the emergence of fan culture was a process where the media contents and ideas concerning fandom interacted in multi-dimensional ways between the various actors. The music industry, media publicity and fan audience formed the macro-level of this interactive network. The contents of fandom formed within this framework assumed their practical meaning in the daily lives of young people. These everyday meanings of fandom were concretized in the form of various consumption and production practices, through which the macro-level interrelationships were again redefined.
  • Juvonen, Tarja (Nuorisotutkimusverkosto/Nuorisotutkimusseura, 2015)
    This doctoral dissertation examines the construction of agency among young people on the threshold of adulthood who are, or risk being, socially excluded. Adolescence involves many choices and decisions that impact later life, such as leaving the parental home and transitioning to independent living, establishing financial independence, making decisions about education and careers, and starting a family. An essential part of adolescence is the pursuit of autonomy and finding one s place in the adult world and its social order. Adolescents who cannot attain these goals are easily rejected as non-adults who fail to meet social expectations for different age groups and life stages. This rejection has the effect of excluding them from full citizenship. Emerging adulthood is particularly challenging for adolescents living in vulnerable circumstances who feel they are not yet ready or able to make decisions about their life. The choices they must make may also involve options that adolescents find dissatisfactory or difficult to handle. This dissertation explores young people s agency from a relational perspective, emphasising the social and contextual basis of agency rather than its individualist foundation. The relational perspective relates to autonomous agency primarily because the construction of autonomy can require the context of human relationships and mutual dependency. In contrast, an emphasis on agency that stresses individuality and independence may engender feelings of loneliness and insecurity as well as of going through the motions of a life with no true sense of meaning. People who work with and support adolescents should also bear in mind that wellbeing depends substantially on the ability of individuals to connect with others. A lack of relationships and a feeling of loneliness characterise the lives of many socially excluded and disadvantaged people. The relational perspective is particularly obvious among those without relationships. This dissertation employs a constructionist philosophy and a relational viewpoint. It focuses on outreach work and, more broadly, the service network that strives to help young people. The research data comprise documents from 2001 on street-based youth work, recordings from the development seminar of a working group, interviews with young people encountered during outreach work in 2010 and 2011, the working group s focus group discussions and recorded client visits. The four scientific articles included in the dissertation use content analysis and the voice-centred relational method to consider the themes of control, the construction of autonomous agency and the concept of having-to as it pertains to young people. The first of the articles discusses elements of control in outreach work. The three other articles explore the theme of agency and the associated relational perspective. The second and third articles examine the construction of young people s autonomous agency, first in tense meetings with outreach workers and the authorities, and then from the perspective of the challenges of independent living. The fourth article analyses the construction of adolescents agency from the viewpoint of cultural expectations, particularly the concept of having-to. The results of the articles inform the concluding section, which addresses the two research questions: How is the autonomous agency of young people constructed in the tense relationship of social control, professional support and having-to, and how is the relational approach connected to the construction of young people s autonomous agency? The results demonstrate that various social structures and service systems provide a framework for the construction of agency, particularly among young people who are or risk being socially excluded. Even the most autonomous individual must deal with certain have-to s and is the subject of control through both societal and social relationships. Both control and culturally defined having-to are factors that define the limits of agency based on freedom and choices. As clients of outreach work, adolescents who are or risk being socially excluded must negotiate with various societal representatives about the limits of their autonomy and range of choices and must respond to the expectation of stronger agency. Young people s experience of their agency and place in the world depends partly on social ties, relationships and the various resources available to them. Strengthening the agency of young people encountered through outreach work requires long-term partnership and support to help them succeed in the challenging transition to adulthood, which is limited by having-to. Interaction in outreach work, the parties meetings or failures to meet each other, plays an important role. Those involved in such work have the power to profoundly affect young people s lives as well as their ideas of themselves and their significance. External compulsion or decisions made without the adolescents contribution do not improve their self-understanding or autonomous agency, which are important to any definition of a good life.

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