Preparation and execution of teeth clenching and foot muscle contraction influence on corticospinal hand-muscle excitability

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http://hdl.handle.net/10138/187413

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Komeilipoor , N , Ilmoniemi , R J , Tiippana , K , Vainio , M , Tiainen , M & Vainio , L 2017 , ' Preparation and execution of teeth clenching and foot muscle contraction influence on corticospinal hand-muscle excitability ' , Scientific Reports , vol. 7 , 41249 . https://doi.org/10.1038/srep41249

Title: Preparation and execution of teeth clenching and foot muscle contraction influence on corticospinal hand-muscle excitability
Author: Komeilipoor, Naeem; Ilmoniemi, Risto J.; Tiippana, Kaisa; Vainio, Martti; Tiainen, Mikko; Vainio, Lari
Contributor: University of Helsinki, Behavioural Sciences
University of Helsinki, Aalto University
University of Helsinki, Medicum
University of Helsinki, Department of Modern Languages 2010-2017
University of Helsinki, Behavioural Sciences
University of Helsinki, Medicum
Date: 2017-01-24
Language: eng
Number of pages: 9
Belongs to series: Scientific Reports
ISSN: 2045-2322
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/10138/187413
Abstract: Contraction of a muscle modulates not only the corticospinal excitability (CSE) of the contracting muscle but also that of different muscles. We investigated to what extent the CSE of a hand muscle is modulated during preparation and execution of teeth clenching and ipsilateral foot dorsiflexion either separately or in combination. Hand-muscle CSE was estimated based on motor evoked potentials (MEPs) elicited by transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) and recorded from the first dorsal interosseous (FDI) muscle. We found higher excitability during both preparation and execution of all the motor tasks than during mere observation of a fixation cross. As expected, the excitability was greater during the execution phase than the preparation one. Furthermore, both execution and preparation of combined motor tasks led to higher excitability than individual tasks. These results extend our current understanding of the neural interactions underlying simultaneous contraction of muscles in different body parts.
Subject: 515 Psychology
TRANSCRANIAL MAGNETIC STIMULATION
MOTOR-EVOKED-POTENTIALS
VOLUNTARY MOVEMENT
NEURAL REPRESENTATIONS
FOREARM MUSCLES
CORTEX
BRAIN
AREAS
FACILITATION
HUMANS
6161 Phonetics
6162 Cognitive science
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