Connectivity to computers and the Internet among patients with schizophrenia spectrum disorders : a cross-sectional study

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http://hdl.handle.net/10138/196943

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Valimaki , M , Kuosmanen , L , Hatonen , H , Koivunen , M , Pitkanen , A , Athanasopoulou , C & Anttila , M 2017 , ' Connectivity to computers and the Internet among patients with schizophrenia spectrum disorders : a cross-sectional study ' , Neuropsychiatric Disease and Treatment , vol. 13 , pp. 1201-1209 . https://doi.org/10.2147/NDT.S130818

Title: Connectivity to computers and the Internet among patients with schizophrenia spectrum disorders : a cross-sectional study
Author: Valimaki, Maritta; Kuosmanen, Lauri; Hatonen, Heli; Koivunen, Marita; Pitkanen, Anneli; Athanasopoulou, Christina; Anttila, Minna
Contributor: University of Helsinki, Clinicum
Date: 2017
Language: eng
Number of pages: 9
Belongs to series: Neuropsychiatric Disease and Treatment
ISSN: 1178-2021
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/10138/196943
Abstract: Purpose: Information and communication technologies have been developed for a variety of health care applications and user groups in the field of health care. This study examined the connectivity to computers and the Internet among patients with schizophrenia spectrum disorders (SSDs). Patients and methods: A cross-sectional survey design was used to study 311 adults with SSDs from the inpatient units of two psychiatric hospitals in Finland. The data collection lasted for 20 months and was done through patients' medical records and a self-reported, structured questionnaire. Data analysis included descriptive statistics. Results: In total, 297 patients were included in this study (response rate =96%). More than half of them (n=156; 55%) had a computer and less than half of them (n=127; 44%) had the Internet at home. Of those who generally had access to computers and the Internet, more than one-fourth (n=85; 29%) used computers daily, and > 30% (n=96; 33%) never accessed the Internet. In total, approximately one-fourth of them (n=134; 25%) learned to use computers, and less than one-third of them (n=143; 31%) were known to use the Internet by themselves. Older people (aged 45-65 years) and those with less years of education (primary school) tended not to use the computers and the Internet at all (P <0.001), and younger people and those with higher education were associated with more active use. Conclusion: Patients had quite good access to use computers and the Internet, and they mainly used the Internet to seek information. Social, occupational, and psychological functioning (which were evaluated with Global Assessment of Functioning) were not associated with access to and frequency of computer and the Internet use. The results support the use of computers and the Internet as part of clinical work in mental health care.
Subject: digital divide
technology
mental illness
psychosis
survey
SEVERE MENTAL-ILLNESS
RANDOMIZED CONTROLLED-TRIAL
PEER SUPPORT
HEALTH INFORMATION
EDUCATION
PEOPLE
TECHNOLOGY
INTERVENTION
METAANALYSIS
SERVICES
3112 Neurosciences
3124 Neurology and psychiatry
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