Infection rates and prevalence of metazoan parasites of the non-native round goby (Neogobius melanostomus) in the Baltic Sea

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Herlevi , H , Puntila , R , Kuosa , H & Fagerholm , H-P 2017 , ' Infection rates and prevalence of metazoan parasites of the non-native round goby (Neogobius melanostomus) in the Baltic Sea ' , Hydrobiologia , vol. 792 , no. 1 , pp. 265-282 . https://doi.org/10.1007/s10750-016-3062-6

Title: Infection rates and prevalence of metazoan parasites of the non-native round goby (Neogobius melanostomus) in the Baltic Sea
Author: Herlevi, Heidi; Puntila, Riikka; Kuosa, Harri; Fagerholm, Hans-Peter
Contributor: University of Helsinki, Aquatic Sciences
Date: 2017-05
Language: eng
Number of pages: 18
Belongs to series: Hydrobiologia
ISSN: 0018-8158
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/10138/205964
Abstract: Studies in the Baltic Sea have identified over 30 parasite taxa infecting the invasive round goby (Neogobius melanostomus (Pallas, 1814). In this study, we aimed at comparing parasite assemblages and infection rates (prevalence and intensity) in different populations across the invasive range in the Baltic Sea (Denmark, Lithuania, Estonia and Finland). Infection rates were 56-60% across all locations except Lithuania (28%). However, the parasite assemblages in the sampled populations were dissimilar, each location having unique parasites. In addition, many of the parasites were generalists commonly infecting native fish species. Based on the results of this study and those previously conducted in the Baltic Sea, the round goby has not retained parasites from its area of origin, but instead has been successively colonized by native generalist parasites. Although variable, overall parasite richness is still quite low around the Baltic compared to the native areas (34 vs 71 taxa, respectively). Also, prevalence and mean infection intensities in the Baltic Sea are significantly lower than in the native areas. Therefore, the invasion success of the round goby in the Baltic Sea can at least partly be attributed to enemy release, in this case shedding a significant proportion of their native parasite load.
Subject: Parasite prevalence
Parasite assemblages
Enemy release
Invasion
Invasion ecology
ENEMY RELEASE HYPOTHESIS
GREAT-LAKES
CONTRACAECUM-RUDOLPHII
INVASION SUCCESS
CURONIAN LAGOON
GOBIIDAE
PALLAS
ECOSYSTEM
FISH
COMMUNITIES
1172 Environmental sciences
1181 Ecology, evolutionary biology
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