Balancing the risks of hydraulic failure and carbon starvation : a twig scale analysis in declining Scots pine

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dc.contributor.author Salmon, Yann
dc.contributor.author Torres-Ruiz, Jose M.
dc.contributor.author Poyatos, Rafael
dc.contributor.author Martinez-Vilalta, Jordi
dc.contributor.author Meir, Patrick
dc.contributor.author Cochard, Herve
dc.contributor.author Mencuccini, Maurizio
dc.date.accessioned 2017-08-10T10:47:00Z
dc.date.available 2017-08-10T10:47:00Z
dc.date.issued 2015-12
dc.identifier.citation Salmon , Y , Torres-Ruiz , J M , Poyatos , R , Martinez-Vilalta , J , Meir , P , Cochard , H & Mencuccini , M 2015 , ' Balancing the risks of hydraulic failure and carbon starvation : a twig scale analysis in declining Scots pine ' , Plant, Cell and Environment , vol. 38 , no. 12 , pp. 2575-2588 . https://doi.org/10.1111/pce.12572
dc.identifier.other PURE: 58234680
dc.identifier.other PURE UUID: 0e1ccf12-3861-4bde-9d46-71c4ccb507da
dc.identifier.other WOS: 000365794900009
dc.identifier.other Scopus: 84933566417
dc.identifier.other ORCID: /0000-0003-4433-4021/work/29770656
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/10138/209572
dc.description.abstract Understanding physiological processes involved in drought-induced mortality is important for predicting the future of forests and for modelling the carbon and water cycles. Recent research has highlighted the variable risks of carbon starvation and hydraulic failure in drought-exposed trees. However, little is known about the specific responses of leaves and supporting twigs, despite their critical role in balancing carbon acquisition and water loss. Comparing healthy (non-defoliated) and unhealthy (defoliated) Scots pine at the same site, we measured the physiological variables involved in regulating carbon and water resources. Defoliated trees showed different responses to summer drought compared with non-defoliated trees. Defoliated trees maintained gas exchange while non-defoliated trees reduced photosynthesis and transpiration during the drought period. At the branch scale, very few differences were observed in non-structural carbohydrate concentrations between health classes. However, defoliated trees tended to have lower water potentials and smaller hydraulic safety margins. While non-defoliated trees showed a typical response to drought for an isohydric species, the physiology appears to be driven in defoliated trees by the need to maintain carbon resources in twigs. These responses put defoliated trees at higher risk of branch hydraulic failure and help explain the interaction between carbon starvation and hydraulic failure in dying trees. en
dc.format.extent 14
dc.language.iso eng
dc.relation.ispartof Plant, Cell and Environment
dc.rights cc_by
dc.rights.uri info:eu-repo/semantics/openAccess
dc.subject drought
dc.subject ecophysiology
dc.subject leaf gas exchange
dc.subject mortality
dc.subject NSC
dc.subject photosynthesis
dc.subject transpiration
dc.subject tree
dc.subject DROUGHT-INDUCED MORTALITY
dc.subject INDUCED TREE MORTALITY
dc.subject NE IBERIAN PENINSULA
dc.subject LEAF GAS-EXCHANGE
dc.subject SYLVESTRIS L.
dc.subject SPATIAL INTERPOLATION
dc.subject CARBOHYDRATE DYNAMICS
dc.subject VEGETATION MORTALITY
dc.subject XYLEM CAVITATION
dc.subject PUBESCENT OAK
dc.subject 4112 Forestry
dc.subject 114 Physical sciences
dc.title Balancing the risks of hydraulic failure and carbon starvation : a twig scale analysis in declining Scots pine en
dc.type Article
dc.contributor.organization Department of Physics
dc.contributor.organization Ecosystem processes (INAR Forest Sciences)
dc.contributor.organization Micrometeorology and biogeochemical cycles
dc.contributor.organization Viikki Plant Science Centre (ViPS)
dc.description.reviewstatus Peer reviewed
dc.relation.doi https://doi.org/10.1111/pce.12572
dc.relation.issn 0140-7791
dc.rights.accesslevel openAccess
dc.type.version publishedVersion

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