Gendered medicinal plant knowledge contributions to adaptive capacity and health sovereignty in Amazonia

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Díaz-Reviriego , I , Fernandez-Llamazares Onrubia , A , Salpeteur , M , Howard , P L & Reyes-García , V 2016 , ' Gendered medicinal plant knowledge contributions to adaptive capacity and health sovereignty in Amazonia ' , Ambio , vol. 45 , no. Supplement 3 , pp. 263-275 . https://doi.org/10.1007/s13280-016-0826-1

Title: Gendered medicinal plant knowledge contributions to adaptive capacity and health sovereignty in Amazonia
Author: Díaz-Reviriego, Isabel; Fernandez-Llamazares Onrubia, Alvaro; Salpeteur, Matthieu; Howard, Patricia L.; Reyes-García, Victoria
Contributor organization: Biosciences
Centre of Excellence in Metapopulation Research
Global Change and Conservation Lab
Date: 2016-11
Language: eng
Number of pages: 13
Belongs to series: Ambio
ISSN: 0044-7447
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/s13280-016-0826-1
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/10138/212980
Abstract: Local medical systems are key elements of social-ecological systems as they provide culturally appropriate and locally accessible health care options, especially for populations with scarce access to biomedicine. The adaptive capacity of local medical systems generally rests on two pillars: species diversity and a robust local knowledge system, both threatened by local and global environmental change. We first present a conceptual framework to guide the assessment of knowledge diversity and redundancy in local medicinal knowledge systems through a gender lens. Then, we apply this conceptual framework to our research on the local medicinal plant knowledge of the Tsimane’ Amerindians. Our results suggest that Tsimane’ medicinal plant knowledge is gendered and that the frequency of reported ailments and the redundancy of knowledge used to treat them are positively associated. We discuss the implications of knowledge diversity and redundancy for local knowledge systems’ adaptive capacity, resilience, and health sovereignty.
Subject: 1172 Environmental sciences
resilience
ethnomedicine
local environmental knowledge
global environmental change
Amazonia
5143 Social and cultural anthropology
ethnomedicine
gender studies
health sovereignty
Peer reviewed: Yes
Rights: cc_by
Usage restriction: openAccess
Self-archived version: publishedVersion


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