Severity of frailty and the outcome of exercise intervention among participants with Alzheimer disease : A sub-group analysis of a randomized controlled trial

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Perttilä , N , Ohman , H , Strandberg , T E , Kautiainen , H , Raivio , M , Laakkonen , M -L , Savikko , N , Tilvis , R S & Pitkala , K H 2016 , ' Severity of frailty and the outcome of exercise intervention among participants with Alzheimer disease : A sub-group analysis of a randomized controlled trial ' , European Geriatric Medicine , vol. 7 , no. 2 , pp. 117-121 . https://doi.org/10.1016/j.eurger.2015.12.014

Title: Severity of frailty and the outcome of exercise intervention among participants with Alzheimer disease : A sub-group analysis of a randomized controlled trial
Author: Perttilä, Niko; Ohman, H.; Strandberg, T. E.; Kautiainen, H.; Raivio, M.; Laakkonen, M. -L.; Savikko, N.; Tilvis, R. S.; Pitkala, K. H.
Contributor: University of Helsinki, Clinicum
University of Helsinki, Clinicum
University of Helsinki, Clinicum
University of Helsinki, Department of General Practice and Primary Health Care
University of Helsinki, Clinicum
University of Helsinki, Clinicum
University of Helsinki, Clinicum
University of Helsinki, Clinicum
Date: 2016-04
Language: eng
Number of pages: 5
Belongs to series: European Geriatric Medicine
ISSN: 1878-7649
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/10138/223939
Abstract: Introduction: To investigate how frailty status affects the outcome of exercise intervention among home-dwelling participants with Alzheimer disease (AD). Methods: This is a sub-group analysis of a randomized controlled trial. In this trial, home-dwelling participants with AD received either home-based or group-based exercise twice a week for one year (n = 129); the control group received normal care (n = 65). Both the intervention and control group were subdivided into two groups according to modified Fried criteria: prefrail (0-1 criteria) and advanced frailty (2-5 criteria). The Functional Independence Measure (FIM) and number of falls per person-years served as outcome measures. Results: Whereas there was no significant difference in FIM between the prefrail intervention (PRI) and control (PRC) groups at 3 or 6 months, the PRI group deteriorated significantly slower at 12 months (-6.6 [95% CI -8.6 to -4.5] for PRI and -11.1 [95% CI -13.9 to -8.3] for PRC; P = 0.010). Similarly, there was no significant difference between the advanced frailty intervention (AFI) and control (AFC) groups at 3 months, but the difference became significant at 6 months (-8.1 [95% CI -11.1 to -5.2] for AFI and -15.5 [95% CI -20.0 to -11.1] for AFC; P = 0.007) and at 12 months (-8.9 [95% CI -11.9 to -5.9] for AFI and -15.3 [95% CI -20.2 to -10.3] for AFC; P = 0.031). There was also a significant difference in the number of falls in favor of PRI and AFI groups compared to their respective control groups. Conclusion: A long-term exercise intervention benefited people with AD regardless of their stage of frailty. Trial registration: : ACTRN12608000037303. (C) 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS and European Union Geriatric Medicine Society. All rights reserved.
Subject: Frailty
Exercise
Alzheimer disease
Falls
Functional performance
OLDER-ADULTS
COGNITIVE IMPAIRMENT
ELDERLY-PEOPLE
DEMENTIA
METAANALYSIS
ASSOCIATION
DISABILITY
FALLS
SCALE
RISK
3121 General medicine, internal medicine and other clinical medicine
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