Oral motor functions, speech and communication before a definitive diagnosis of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis

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http://hdl.handle.net/10138/224057

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Makkonen , T , Korpijaakko-Huuhka , A-M , Ruottinen , H , Puhto , R , Hollo , K , Ylinen , A & Palmio , J 2016 , ' Oral motor functions, speech and communication before a definitive diagnosis of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis ' , Journal of Communication Disorders , vol. 61 , pp. 97-105 . https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jcomdis.2016.04.002

Title: Oral motor functions, speech and communication before a definitive diagnosis of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis
Author: Makkonen, Tanja; Korpijaakko-Huuhka, Anna-Maija; Ruottinen, Hanna; Puhto, Riitta; Hollo, Kirsi; Ylinen, Aarne; Palmio, Johanna
Other contributor: University of Helsinki, Clinicum


Date: 2016
Language: eng
Number of pages: 9
Belongs to series: Journal of Communication Disorders
ISSN: 0021-9924
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jcomdis.2016.04.002
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/10138/224057
Abstract: The aim of this study was to explore the cranial nerve symptoms, speech disorders and communicative effectiveness of Finnish patients with diagnosed or possible amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) at their first assessment by a speech-language pathologist. The group studied consisted of 30 participants who had clinical signs of bulbar deterioration at the beginning of the study. They underwent a thorough clinical speech and communication examination. The cranial nerve symptoms and ability to communicate were compared in 14 participants with probable or definitive ALS and in 16 participants with suspected or possible ALS. The initial type of ALS was also assessed. More deterioration in soft palate function was found in participants with possible ALS than with diagnosed ALS. Likewise, a slower speech rate combined with more severe dysarthria was observed in possible ALS. In both groups, there was some deterioration in communicative effectiveness. In the possible ALS group the diagnostic delay was longer and speech therapy intervention actualized later. The participants with ALS showed multidimensional decline in communication at their first visit to the speech-language pathologist, but impairments and activity limitations were more severe in suspected or possible ALS. The majority of persons with bulbar-onset ALS in this study were in the latter diagnostic group. This suggests that they are more susceptible to delayed diagnosis and delayed speech therapy assessment. It is important to start speech therapy intervention during the diagnostic processes particularly if the person already shows bulbar symptoms. (C) 2016 Published by Elsevier Inc.
Subject: Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis
Dysarthria
Speech
Communication
Bulbar symptoms
PROGNOSTIC-FACTORS
SPEAKING RATE
DYSARTHRIA
ALS
INTELLIGIBILITY
DETERIORATION
MOVEMENTS
PATHWAY
TONGUE
3124 Neurology and psychiatry
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