Bile microbiota in primary sclerosing cholangitis : Impact on disease progression and development of biliary dysplasia

Show full item record



Permalink

http://hdl.handle.net/10138/224200

Citation

Pereira , P , Aho , V , Arola , J , Boyd , S , Jokelainen , K , Paulin , L , Auvinen , P & Farkkila , M 2017 , ' Bile microbiota in primary sclerosing cholangitis : Impact on disease progression and development of biliary dysplasia ' , PLoS One , vol. 12 , no. 8 , 0182924 . https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0182924

Title: Bile microbiota in primary sclerosing cholangitis : Impact on disease progression and development of biliary dysplasia
Author: Pereira, Pedro; Aho, Velma; Arola, Johanna; Boyd, Sonja; Jokelainen, Kalle; Paulin, Lars; Auvinen, Petri; Farkkila, Martti
Contributor: University of Helsinki, Institute of Biotechnology
University of Helsinki, Institute of Biotechnology
University of Helsinki, Medicum
University of Helsinki, Medicum
University of Helsinki, Gastroenterologian yksikkö
University of Helsinki, Institute of Biotechnology
University of Helsinki, Institute of Biotechnology
University of Helsinki, Clinicum
Date: 2017-08-10
Language: eng
Number of pages: 15
Belongs to series: PLoS One
ISSN: 1932-6203
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/10138/224200
Abstract: Objective The etiopathogenesis and risk for development of biliary neoplasia in primary sclerosing cholangitis (PSC) are largely unknown. Microbes or their metabolites have been suggested to play a role. To explore this potential microbial involvement, we evaluated the differences in biliary microbiota in PSC patients at an early disease stage without previous endoscopic retrograde cholangiography (ERC) examinations, advanced disease stage, and with biliary dysplasia or cholangiocarcinoma. Design Bile samples from the common bile duct were collected from 46 controls and 80 patients with PSC during ERC (37 with early disease, 32 with advanced disease, and 11 with biliary dysplasia). DNA isolation, amplification, and Illumina MiSeq sequencing were performed for the V1-V3 regions of the bacterial 16S rRNA gene. Results The most common phyla found were Bacteroidetes, Firmicutes, Proteobacteria, Fusobacteria, and Actinobacteria. The most common families were Prevotellaceae, Streptococcaceae, Veillonellaceae, Fusobacteriaceae, and Pasteurellaceae, and the most common genera were Prevotella, Streptococcus, Veillonella, Fusobacterium, and Haemophilus. The bacterial communities of non-PSC subjects and early stage PSC patients were similar. Alpha diversity was lower in patients with biliary dysplasia/cholangiocarcinoma than in other groups. An increase in Streptococcus abundance was positively correlated with the number of ERC examinations. Streptococcus abundance was also positively correlated with an increase in disease severity, even after controlling for the number of ERC examinations. Conclusions Our findings suggest that the aetiology of PSC is not associated with changes in bile microbial communities, but the genus Streptococcus may play a pathogenic role in the progression of the disease.
Subject: MUCOSA-ASSOCIATED MICROBIOTA
CYTOLOGY RISK-FACTORS
INTESTINAL MICROBIOTA
GUT
DYSBIOSIS
3121 General medicine, internal medicine and other clinical medicine
3111 Biomedicine
Rights:


Files in this item

Total number of downloads: Loading...

Files Size Format View
file.pdf 1.237Mb PDF View/Open

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show full item record