Learning with dinosaurs : a study on motivation, cognitive reasoning, and making observations

Show full item record



Permalink

http://hdl.handle.net/10138/228501

Citation

Salmi , H , Thuneberg , H & Vainikainen , M-P 2017 , ' Learning with dinosaurs : a study on motivation, cognitive reasoning, and making observations ' , International Journal of Science Education, Part B: Communication and Public Engagement , vol. 7 , no. 3 , pp. 203-218 . https://doi.org/10.1080/21548455.2016.1200155

Title: Learning with dinosaurs : a study on motivation, cognitive reasoning, and making observations
Author: Salmi, Hannu; Thuneberg, Helena; Vainikainen, Mari-Pauliina
Contributor: University of Helsinki, Department of Education
University of Helsinki, Department of Education
University of Helsinki, Department of Education
Date: 2017
Language: eng
Number of pages: 16
Belongs to series: International Journal of Science Education, Part B: Communication and Public Engagement
ISSN: 2154-8455
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/10138/228501
Abstract: Dinosaurs have been a very popular science topic since signs of their presence on earth were first discovered. They have represented so-called ‘edutainment’ for some people. Learning from informal sources and in- an out-of-school environment can be effective and motivating. In this study, 12-year-old pupils (N = 366) visited a dinosaur science centre exhibition in Finland. Pupils were tested with standardised tests of motivation as defined by self-determination theory, cognitive skills, and interest via pre-, post-, and delayed post-tests during a six-month period. Findings show that pupils learned from the science centre visit and enjoyed the experience. The factors explaining their post-test knowledge in addition to their previous knowledge were (1) general cognitive competence, (2) liking studying biology at the science centre, (3) participation in a dinosaur demonstration, and (4) gender. As there was no difference between boys and girls in general cognitive competences, the knowledge results of boys and girls equally related to their cognitive competence. Autonomy also influenced situational motivation both directly and indirectly, which in turn had a strong effect on liking studying in the exhibition. It also influenced the post-test knowledge indirectly. In the lowest school achievement group, participation in the dinosaur demonstration increased knowledge in the post-test.
Subject: 516 Educational sciences
Science centre
formal - informal links
learning environments
motivation
Science centre
Learning environment
formal - informal links
SCIENCE
CHILDREN
ATTITUDES
museum
TALK
INTERVENTION
GENDER
texts
MODEL
Rights:


Files in this item

Total number of downloads: Loading...

Files Size Format View
Learning_with_d ... nd_making_observations.pdf 1.643Mb PDF View/Open

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show full item record