Boreal forest BVOC exchange : emissions versus in-canopy sinks

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Zhou , P , Ganzeveld , L , Taipale , D , Rannik , U , Rantala , P , Rissanen , M P , Chen , D & Boy , M 2017 , ' Boreal forest BVOC exchange : emissions versus in-canopy sinks ' , Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics , vol. 17 , no. 23 , pp. 14309-14332 . https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-17-14309-2017

Title: Boreal forest BVOC exchange : emissions versus in-canopy sinks
Author: Zhou, Putian; Ganzeveld, Laurens; Taipale, Ditte; Rannik, Ullar; Rantala, Pekka; Rissanen, Matti Petteri; Chen, Dean; Boy, Michael
Contributor: University of Helsinki, Department of Physics
University of Helsinki, Department of Forest Sciences
University of Helsinki, Department of Physics
University of Helsinki, Department of Physics
University of Helsinki, Department of Physics
University of Helsinki, Department of Physics
University of Helsinki, Department of Physics
Date: 2017-12-04
Language: eng
Number of pages: 24
Belongs to series: Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics
ISSN: 1680-7316
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/10138/229859
Abstract: A multilayer gas dry deposition model has been developed and implemented into a one-dimensional chemical transport model SOSAA (model to Simulate the concentrations of Organic vapours, Sulphuric Acid and Aerosols) to calculate the dry deposition velocities for all the gas species included in the chemistry scheme. The new model was used to analyse in-canopy sources and sinks, including gas emissions, chemical production and loss, dry deposition, and turbulent transport of 12 featured biogenic volatile organic compounds (BVOCs) or groups of BVOCs (e.g. monoterpenes, isoprene+2-methyl-3-buten-2-ol (MBO), sesquiterpenes, and oxidation products of mono-and sesquiterpenes) in July 2010 at the boreal forest site SMEAR II (Station for Measuring Ecosystem-Atmosphere Relations). According to the significance of modelled monthly-averaged individual source and sink terms inside the canopy, the selected BVOCs were classified into five categories: 1. Most of emitted gases are transported out of the canopy (monoterpenes, isoprene + MBO). 2. Chemical reactions remove a significant portion of emitted gases (sesquiterpenes). 3. Bidirectional fluxes occur since both emission and dry deposition are crucial for the in-canopy concentration tendency (acetaldehyde, methanol, acetone, formaldehyde). 4. Gases removed by deposition inside the canopy are compensated for by the gases transported from above the canopy (acetol, pinic acid, beta-caryophyllene's oxidation product BCSOZOH). 5. The chemical production is comparable to the sink by deposition (isoprene's oxidation products ISOP34OOH and ISOP34NO3). Most of the simulated sources and sinks were located above about 0.2 h(c) (canopy height) for oxidation products and above about 0.4 h(c) for emitted species except formaldehyde. In addition, soil deposition (including deposition onto understorey vegetation) contributed 11-61% to the overall in-canopy deposition. The emission sources peaked at about 0.8-0.9 h(c), which was higher than 0.6 h(c) where the maximum of dry deposition onto overstorey vegetation was located. This study provided a method to enable the quantification of the exchange between atmosphere and biosphere for numerous BVOCs, which could be applied in large-scale models in future. With this more explicit canopy exchange modelling system, this study analysed both the temporal and spatial variations in individual in-canopy sources and sinks, as well as their combined effects on driving BVOC exchange. In this study 12 featured BVOCs or BVOC groups were analysed. Other compounds could also be investigated similarly by being classified into these five categories.
Subject: VOLATILE ORGANIC-COMPOUNDS
HENRYS LAW CONSTANTS
DRY DEPOSITION PARAMETERIZATION
GLOBAL ATMOSPHERIC BUDGET
GENERAL-CIRCULATION MODEL
SCOTS PINE FOREST
SULFURIC-ACID
TROPOSPHERIC DEGRADATION
BIDIRECTIONAL EXCHANGE
MONOTERPENE EMISSIONS
114 Physical sciences
4112 Forestry
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