Determinants of stimulated salivary flow among haematopoietic stem cell transplantation recipients

Show full item record



Permalink

http://hdl.handle.net/10138/232269

Citation

Mauramo , M , Rohde , L , Ramseier , A M , Rovo , A & Waltimo , T 2017 , ' Determinants of stimulated salivary flow among haematopoietic stem cell transplantation recipients ' , Clinical Oral Investigations , vol. 21 , no. 1 , pp. 121-126 . https://doi.org/10.1007/s00784-016-1760-0

Title: Determinants of stimulated salivary flow among haematopoietic stem cell transplantation recipients
Author: Mauramo, Matti; Rohde, Luzius; Ramseier, Adrian M.; Rovo, Alicia; Waltimo, Tuomas
Other contributor: University of Helsinki, Clinicum



Date: 2017-01
Language: eng
Number of pages: 6
Belongs to series: Clinical Oral Investigations
ISSN: 1432-6981
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/s00784-016-1760-0
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/10138/232269
Abstract: The aetiology of hyposalivation in haematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) recipients is not fully understood. This study examined the effects of treatment-related aetiological factors, particularly medications, on stimulated salivary flow in HSCT recipients. Adult HSCT recipients (N = 118, 66 males, 27 autologous and 91 allogeneic transplants) were examined. Stimulated whole salivary flow rates (SWSFR) were measured before HSCT and at 6 and 12 months post-HSCT. Linear regression models were used to analyse the associations of medications and transplant-related factors with salivary flow rates, which were compared to salivary flow rates of generally healthy controls (N = 247). The SWSFR of recipients were lower pre-HSCT (mean +/- standard deviation, 0.88 +/- 0.56 ml/min; P <0.001), 6 months post-HSCT (0.84 +/- 0.61; P <0.001) and 12 months post-HSCT (1.08 +/- 0.67; P = 0.005) than the SWSFR of controls (1.31 +/- 0.65). In addition, hyposalivation (<0.7 ml/min) was more frequent among HSCT recipients pre-HSCT (P <0.001), 6 months post-HSCT (P <0.001) and 12 months post-HSCT (P = 0.01) than among controls. The SWSFR was observed to improve over time being significantly higher 12 months post-HSCT compared to pre-HSCT (P <0.001). The observed decrease of salivary flow could not be explained by the examined transplant-related factors and medications. Decreased stimulated salivary flow rates could not be explained by the examined factors alone; these findings indicate that hyposalivation in HSCT recipients exhibits a multifactorial aetiology. All HSCT recipients should be considered to be at high risk of hyposalivation and consequent oral diseases, and they should be treated accordingly.
Subject: Saliva
Hyposalivation
Medications
Drugs
Stem cell transplantation
Haematology
VERSUS-HOST-DISEASE
LONG-TERM SURVIVORS
QUALITY-OF-LIFE
ORAL COMPLICATIONS
CANCER-THERAPY
INVOLVEMENT
INFECTIONS
PREVALENCE
XEROSTOMIA
UPDATE
313 Dentistry
3126 Surgery, anesthesiology, intensive care, radiology
Rights:


Files in this item

Total number of downloads: Loading...

Files Size Format View
s00784_016_1760_0.pdf 275.2Kb PDF View/Open

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show full item record