Preschool children's context-specific sedentary behaviours and parental socioeconomic status in Finland : a cross-sectional study

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Määttä , S , Konttinen , H , Haukkala , A , Erkkola , M & Roos , E 2017 , ' Preschool children's context-specific sedentary behaviours and parental socioeconomic status in Finland : a cross-sectional study ' , BMJ Open , vol. 7 , no. 11 , 016690 . https://doi.org/10.1136/bmjopen-2017-016690

Title: Preschool children's context-specific sedentary behaviours and parental socioeconomic status in Finland : a cross-sectional study
Author: Määttä, Suvi; Konttinen, Hanna; Haukkala, Ari; Erkkola, Maijaliisa; Roos, Eva
Other contributor: University of Helsinki, Department of Food and Nutrition
University of Helsinki, Center for Population, Health and Society
University of Helsinki, Maijaliisa Erkkola / Principal Investigator
University of Helsinki, Department of Public Health












Date: 2017-11
Language: eng
Number of pages: 10
Belongs to series: BMJ Open
ISSN: 2044-6055
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1136/bmjopen-2017-016690
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/10138/232513
Abstract: Objectives This study examined the associations of parental socioeconomic status (SES) with preschoolers' objectively measured sedentary time (SED) over the course of a week and with parent-reported children's screen and reading times at home as indicators of sedentary behaviours (SB). Design Cross-sectional. Setting In years 2015 and 2016 in Finland. Participants 864 children, aged 3-6 years, with their parents. Outcome measures Children's accelerometer data were transformed into average SED minutes per hour in different contexts (preschool, home during preschool days, weekend and total). Parent-reported children's screen and reading times were expressed as average daily minutes. The SES indicators (maternal and paternal education and relative household income) were grouped into three categories. Linear or logistic regression analyses were used, with municipality, season, and children's gender and age as covariates. CIs were adjusted for clustering at the preschool group level. Results Children with low maternal (beta=17.21, 95% CI: 8.71 to 25.71) and paternal (beta=10.54, 95% CI: 0.77 to 20.30) education had more overall screen time at home than their more advantaged counterparts. SES differences in overall screen time were mostly explained by TV viewing. Children with low as opposed to high maternal education (beta=-2.66, 95% CI: -4.95 to -0.38) had less reading time at home. Children whose fathers were on the middle (beta=-1.15, 95% CI: -2.01 to -0.29) educational level had less weekend SED than those with high paternal education. Otherwise, parental SES was not related to objectively measured SED. Conclusions The results of this study highlight the fact that the associations between parental SES and preschoolers' SB are dependent on the indicators of SES and SBs, and vary between different contexts. Generally, parental SES was not associated with SED, whereas some SES differences existed in screen time and reading time at home. Interventions aiming to diminish SES differences in children's SB should focus on home hours.
Subject: PHYSICAL-ACTIVITY
SCREEN TIME
EARLY-CHILDHOOD
HEALTH INDICATORS
MEDIA GUIDELINES
HOME-ENVIRONMENT
YOUNG-CHILDREN
METAANALYSIS
ACCELEROMETER
ADOLESCENTS
3142 Public health care science, environmental and occupational health
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