Family history and perceived risk of diabetes, cardiovascular disease, cancer, and depression

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Vornanen , M E , Konttinen , H M , Kääriäinen , H , Mannisto , S , Salomaa , V , Perola , M & Haukkala , A H 2016 , ' Family history and perceived risk of diabetes, cardiovascular disease, cancer, and depression ' , Preventive Medicine , vol. 90 , pp. 177-183 . https://doi.org/10.1016/j.ypmed.2016.06.027

Title: Family history and perceived risk of diabetes, cardiovascular disease, cancer, and depression
Author: Vornanen, Marleena Emilia; Konttinen, Hanna Marja; Kääriäinen, Helena; Mannisto, Satu; Salomaa, Veikko; Perola, Markus; Haukkala, Ari Heikki
Contributor: University of Helsinki, Department of Social Research (2010-2017)
University of Helsinki, Department of Social Research (2010-2017)
University of Helsinki, Department of Social Research (2010-2017)
Date: 2016
Language: eng
Number of pages: 7
Belongs to series: Preventive Medicine
ISSN: 0091-7435
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/10138/232666
Abstract: Background: Family history is a useful and inexpensive tool to assess risks of multifactorial diseases. Family history enables individualized disease prevention, but its effects on perceived risks of various diseases need to be understood in more detail. We examined how family history relates to perceived risk of diabetes mellitus, cardiovascular disease (CVD), cancer, and depression, and whether these associations are independent of or moderated by sociodemographic factors, health behavior/weight status (smoking, alcohol consumption, physical activity, BMI [kg/m²]), or depressive symptoms. Methods: Participants were Finnish 25−74-year-olds (N=6258) from a population-based FINRISK 2007 study. Perceived absolute lifetime risks (1–5) and first-degree family history of CVD, diabetes, cancer and depression, and health behaviors were self-reported. Weight and height were measured in a health examination. Results: Family history was most prevalent for cancer (36.7 %), least for depression (19.6 %). Perceived risk mean was highest for CVD (2.8), lowest for depression (2.0). Association between family history and perceived risk was strongest for diabetes (β=0.34, P<0.001), weakest for depression (β=0.19, P<0.001). Adjusting for sociodemographics, health behavior, and depressive symptoms did not change these associations. The association between family history and perceived risk tended to be stronger among younger than among older adults, but similar regardless of health behaviors or depressive symptoms. Discussion: Association between family history and perceived risk varies across diseases. People’s current understandings on heritability need to be acknowledged in risk communication practices. Future research should seek to identify effective strategies to combine familial and genetic risk communication in disease prevention.
Subject: 3142 Public health care science, environmental and occupational health
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