Phylogenomics of palearctic Formica species suggests a single origin of temporary parasitism and gives insights to the evolutionary pathway toward slave-making behaviour

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Romiguier , J , Rolland , J , Morandin , C & Keller , L 2018 , ' Phylogenomics of palearctic Formica species suggests a single origin of temporary parasitism and gives insights to the evolutionary pathway toward slave-making behaviour ' , BMC Evolutionary Biology , vol. 18 , 40 . https://doi.org/10.1186/s12862-018-1159-4

Title: Phylogenomics of palearctic Formica species suggests a single origin of temporary parasitism and gives insights to the evolutionary pathway toward slave-making behaviour
Author: Romiguier, Jonathan; Rolland, Jonathan; Morandin, Claire; Keller, Laurent
Other contributor: University of Helsinki, Biosciences
Date: 2018-03-28
Language: eng
Number of pages: 8
Belongs to series: BMC Evolutionary Biology
ISSN: 1471-2148
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1186/s12862-018-1159-4
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/10138/234716
Abstract: Background: The ants of the Formica genus are classical model species in evolutionary biology. In particular, Darwin used Formica as model species to better understand the evolution of slave-making, a parasitic behaviour where workers of another species are stolen to exploit their workforce. In his book "On the Origin of Species" (1859), Darwin first hypothesized that slave-making behaviour in Formica evolved in incremental steps from a free-living ancestor. Methods: The absence of a well-resolved phylogenetic tree of the genus prevent an assessment of whether relationships among Formica subgenera are compatible with this scenario. In this study, we resolve the relationships among the 4 palearctic Formica subgenera (Formica str. s., Coptoformica, Raptiformica and Serviformica) using a phylogenomic dataset of 945 genes for 16 species. Results: We provide a reference tree resolving the relationships among the main Formica subgenera with high bootstrap supports. Discussion: The branching order of our tree suggests that the free-living lifestyle is ancestral in the Formica genus and that parasitic colony founding could have evolved a single time, probably acting as a pre-adaptation to slave-making behaviour. Conclusion: This phylogenetic tree provides a solid backbone for future evolutionary studies in the Formica genus and slave-making behaviour.
Subject: Ants
Formica
Phylogenomics
Social parasitism
Slave-making
Transcriptomes
ANTS HYMENOPTERA
PHYLOGENETIC RECONSTRUCTION
LEPTOTHORACINE ANTS
EUSOCIAL INSECTS
SEQUENCE DATA
HYBRID ANTS
INFERENCE
ALIGNMENT
ANIMALS
GENOMES
1181 Ecology, evolutionary biology
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