Intragroup competition predicts individual foraging specialisation in a group-living mammal

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Sheppard , K E , Inger , R , McDonald , R A , Barker , S , Jackson , A L , Thompson , F J , Vitikainen , E I K , Cant , M A & Marshall , H H 2018 , ' Intragroup competition predicts individual foraging specialisation in a group-living mammal ' , Ecology Letters , vol. 21 , no. 5 , pp. 665-673 . https://doi.org/10.1111/ele.12933

Title: Intragroup competition predicts individual foraging specialisation in a group-living mammal
Author: Sheppard, Katherine E; Inger, Richard; McDonald, Robbie A.; Barker, Sam; Jackson, Andrew L.; Thompson, Faye J.; Vitikainen, Emma I K; Cant, Michael A.; Marshall, Harry H.
Contributor: University of Helsinki, Faculty of Biological and Environmental Sciences
Date: 2018-05
Language: eng
Number of pages: 9
Belongs to series: Ecology Letters
ISSN: 1461-023X
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/10138/234751
Abstract: Individual foraging specialisation has important ecological implications, but its causes in group-living species are unclear. One of the major consequences of group living is increased intragroup competition for resources. Foraging theory predicts that with increased competition, individuals should add new prey items to their diet, widening their foraging niche (‘optimal foraging hypothesis’). However, classic competition theory suggests the opposite: that increased competition leads to niche partitioning and greater individual foraging specialisation (‘niche partitioning hypothesis’). We tested these opposing predictions in wild, group-living banded mongooses (Mungos mungo), using stable isotope analysis of banded mongoose whiskers to quantify individual and group foraging niche. Individual foraging niche size declined with increasing group size, despite all groups having a similar overall niche size. Our findings support the prediction that competition promotes niche partitioning within social groups and suggest that individual foraging specialisation may play an important role in the formation of stable social groupings.
Subject: 1181 Ecology, evolutionary biology
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