The importance of the exposome and allostatic load in the planetary health paradigm

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Logan , A C , Prescott , S L , Haahtela , T & Katz , D L 2018 , ' The importance of the exposome and allostatic load in the planetary health paradigm ' , Journal of Physiological Anthropology , vol. 37 , 15 . https://doi.org/10.1186/s40101-018-0176-8

Title: The importance of the exposome and allostatic load in the planetary health paradigm
Author: Logan, Alan C.; Prescott, Susan L.; Haahtela, Tari; Katz, David L.
Other contributor: University of Helsinki, Department of Dermatology, Allergology and Venereology


Date: 2018-06-04
Language: eng
Number of pages: 10
Belongs to series: Journal of Physiological Anthropology
ISSN: 1880-6805
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1186/s40101-018-0176-8
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/10138/236586
Abstract: In 1980, Jonas Salk (1914-1995) encouraged professionals in anthropology and related disciplines to consider the interconnections between "planetary health," sociocultural changes associated with technological advances, and the biology of human health. The concept of planetary health emphasizes that human health is intricately connected to the health of natural systems within the Earth's biosphere; experts in physiological anthropology have illuminated some of the mechanisms by which experiences in natural environments (or the built environment) can promote or detract from health. For example, shinrin-yoku and related research (which first emerged from Japan in the 1990s) helped set in motion international studies that have since examined physiological responses to time spent in natural and/or urban environments. However, in order to advance such findings into planetary health discourse, it will be necessary to further understand how these biological responses (inflammation and the collective of allostatic load) are connected to psychological constructs such as nature relatedness, and pro-social/environmental attitudes and behaviors. The exposome refers to total environmental exposures-detrimental and beneficial-that can help predict biological responses of the organism to environment over time. Advances in "omics" techniques-metagenomics, proteomics, metabolomics-and systems biology are allowing researchers to gain unprecedented insight into the physiological ramifications of human behavior. Objective markers of stress physiology and microbiome research may help illuminate the personal, public, and planetary health consequences of "extinction of experience." At the same time, planetary health as an emerging multidisciplinary concept will be strengthened by input from the perspectives of physiological anthropology.
Subject: Allostatic load
Exposome
Nature relatedness
Health disparities
Ecology
Non-communicable diseases
Dysbiosis
Natural environments
QUALITY-OF-LIFE
SOCIOECONOMIC-STATUS
NEIGHBORHOOD POVERTY
INFLAMMATORY MARKERS
DNA METHYLATION
OPTIMISM
RISK
ENVIRONMENT
FOREST
STRESS
1184 Genetics, developmental biology, physiology
515 Psychology
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