The evolutionary dynamics of adaptive virginity, sex-allocation, and altruistic helping in haplodiploid animals

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Rautiala , P , Helantera , H & Puurtinen , M 2018 , ' The evolutionary dynamics of adaptive virginity, sex-allocation, and altruistic helping in haplodiploid animals ' , Evolution , vol. 72 , no. 1 , pp. 30-38 . https://doi.org/10.1111/evo.13399

Title: The evolutionary dynamics of adaptive virginity, sex-allocation, and altruistic helping in haplodiploid animals
Author: Rautiala, Petri; Helantera, Heikki; Puurtinen, Mikael
Contributor organization: Evolution, Sociality & Behaviour
Biosciences
Date: 2018-01
Language: eng
Number of pages: 9
Belongs to series: Evolution
ISSN: 0014-3820
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1111/evo.13399
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/10138/237260
Abstract: In haplodiploids, females can produce sons from unfertilized eggs without mating. However, virgin reproduction is usually considered to be a result of a failure to mate, rather than an adaptation. Here, we build an analytical model for evolution of virgin reproduction, sex-allocation, and altruistic female helping in haplodiploid taxa. We show that when mating is costly (e.g., when mating increases predation risk), virginity can evolve as an adaptive female reproductive strategy. Furthermore, adaptive virginity results in strongly divergent sex-ratios in mated and virgin queen nests ("split sex ratios"), which promotes the evolution of altruistic helping by daughters in mated queen nests. However, when helpers evolve to be efficient and increase nest production significantly, virgin reproduction is selected against. Our results suggest that adaptive virginity could have been an important stepping stone on the pathway to eusociality in haplodiploids. We further show that virginity can be an adaptive reproductive strategy also in primitively social haplodiploids if workers bias the sex ratio toward females. By remaining virgin, queens are free to produce sons, the more valuable sex in a female-biased population. Our work brings a new dimension to the studies linking reproductive strategies with social evolution.
Subject: 1181 Ecology, evolutionary biology
Alternative reproduction strategies
mating behavior
reproductive altruism
split sex ratios
virgin reproduction
KIN SELECTION
WORKER REPRODUCTION
INSECT SOCIETIES
PARASITOID WASP
CENTRIS-PALLIDA
SOCIAL INSECTS
ANT WORKERS
EUSOCIALITY
RATIOS
BEE
Peer reviewed: Yes
Rights: unspecified
Usage restriction: closedAccess


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