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  • Laakso, Mikael; Nyman, Linus (M D P I AG, 2016-02-06)
    It has long been argued that the Industry Foundation Classes (IFC) data model standard is the key to unlocking the potential of interoperable Building Information Modeling (BIM). Despite a wealth of published research literature incorporating IFC, there have been no attempts at systematically summarizing the literature related to the standard. Targeting both summation and analysis of thematic developments over time, we performed a comprehensive systematic literature review of IFC‐related research published between 1997 and 2007: the first 11 years of research on the standard. Through a systematic web‐retrieval process, 170 unique publications were collected, read, and mapped to a custom framework. The results reveal that journals and conferences have been an integral part of the technical evaluation and development of the standard. The full classification data is provided as an appendix to facilitate future research on IFC and other standards.
  • Sorsa, Ville-Pekka (Wiley-Blackwell Publishing Ltd, 2015-11-16)
    Over the last few decades, the boundary between public and private responsibility in old-age pension provisions has been redrawn throughout Europe. A new, public–private mix has emerged, not only in pension policy, but also in pension administration. The purpose of this article is to map and conduct a comparative analysis of the administrative design of public–private partnerships (PPPs) in European pension regimes, with a specific focus on how accountabilities are institutionally enforced within the PPP design. Previous literature has recognized accountability as an important factor in promoting trust in mandated pension schemes. However, as the literature on PPPs suggests, institutional arrangements of accountability are more complex in the case of PPPs than has been suggested by previous studies on pension administration. Thus, there is a need for further elaboration of existing comparative models. This study's analysis examines 19 old-age pension schemes that existed in 18 European countries at the beginning of 2013. The findings suggest that significant variations in accountability structures exist, even among schemes that are similar in terms of their pension policy targets. It is concluded that various schemes suffer from ineffective accountability structures that may compromise the legitimacy and sustainability of PPP-type pension schemes.
  • Lindman, Juho (Association for Information Systems, 2015-08-18)
  • Laakso, Mikael; Kere, Juha (Tieteellisten Seurain Valtuuskunta, 2015)
  • Lindman, Juho; Kinnari, Tomi; Rossi, Matti (I E E E, 2015)
  • Hanken School of Economics, Information Systems Science, Helsinki; Widenius, Michael (Monty); Nyman, Linus; (Talent First Network, 2015)
  • Laakso, Mikael (University of Helsinki, 2015)
    Engagement in learning activities enhance the level of learning among students. However, when class sizes grow, such engagement can be difficult to achieve. The learning methods that work well in small classes might not work as well, or even be practically feasible, in large lecture halls. When students remain anonymous and cannot be given individual attention there is a challenge in ensuring high quality learning. In an attempt to address this challenge, the study explores ways to pro- mote active learning in the context of large lecture classes. Based on a review of the fundamentals of active learning in the literature, this article presents a range of methods that can be used to facilitate active learning among students in larger classes. Concluding the article is a description of a practical implementation where some of the suggested learning activities are applied and discussed in the context of an actual university course at the Hanken School of Economics taught by the author.
  • Scambor, Elli; Bergmann, Nadja; Wojnicka, Katazyna; Belghiti-Mahut, Sophie; Hearn, Jeff; Holter, Öystein Gullvåg; Gärtner, Marc; Hrženjak, Majda; Scambor, Christian; White, Alan (SAGE Publications, 2014-12)
    E. Scambor, N. Bergmann, K. Wojnicka, S. Belghiti-Mahut, J. Hearn, Ø. G. Holter, M. Gärtner, M. Hrženjak, C. Scambor, and A. White
  • Lindman, Juho (Universidad de Talca, 2014-09-01)
  • Eränti, Veikko; Lindman, Juho (Valtiotieteellinen yhdistys, 2014-09-01)
  • Hearn, Jeff (Akademie Ved Ceske Republiky * Sociologicky Ustav, 2014-08)
  • Saarikko, Ted; Jonsson, Katrin; Burström, Thommie (2014-06-09)
    In platform ecosystems, the platform provider seeks to derive increasing returns over time as the ecosystem of backing actors grows more numerous. While a growing body of research has addressed the ecosystem strategies of large enterprises, less attention has been paid to small firms in the role of platform providers. As small firms do not possess the resources of large enterprises, they are not in a position to ignore the importance of immediate returns needed for the viability of the firm. In a case study, we study the entrepreneurial alertness of a small technology-based firm in promoting a platform for machine- to-machine communication. Our results suggest that balancing increasing and immediate returns requires a variety of entrepreneurial activities that encompasses strategic foresight and systemic insight on one hand, and exploratory and exploitative actions on the other. This paper contributes to our understanding of platform ecosystems by addressing the strategies of a small firm as an emerging platform provider.
  • Ketokivi, Mikko; Mantere, Saku (Hanken School of Economics, 2014-05-22)
    Incompleteness of inductive reasoning presents an enduring dilemma to organizational research. We examine two practical reasoning strategies—idealization and contextualization—that can be used at the pinnacle of this dilemma: when theoretical conclusions are drawn from empirical data. Understanding the two strategies can lead to more effective argumentation and evaluation. Appreciating the methodological incompleteness of both strategies in turn helps us distinguish between the methodological and the policy dimensions of organization-scientific debates.
  • Mantere, Saku (Hanken School of Economics, 2014-05-22)
    Under which conditions does a collective strategy exist among organizational members? Where should a scholar look for one? To offer one way to start solving these puzzles I propose a view of organizational strategy as a language game that governs the use of strategy labels at the level of the organization. Organizational strategy exhibits a division of linguistic labor, where responsibility for key concepts is assigned to particular individuals or organizational functions. Such linguistic experts oversee the proper use and maintenance of strategy language. The language-based view helps to understand linkages between institutional, network, organizational and micro level views on strategy. It also problematizes widely held intuitions regarding the relationship between strategy and organizational outcomes.
  • Mantere, Saku; Schildt, Henri A.; Sillince, John A.A. (Hanken School of Economics, 2014-05-22)
    When planned change is cancelled, managers may be tempted to reverse their organization’s strategy. Our longitudinal case study documents a cancelled merger effort and a failed attempt to return to the organization’s widely accepted pre-merger strategy. We trace the failure to contradictions in symbolic change management. The phenomenon of change reversal draws attention to the historical continuity of sensemaking and raises caution about the popular view that managers need to destroy organizational meaning in order to facilitate the realization of strategic change.
  • Mantere, Saku; Ketokivi, Mikko (Hanken School of Economics, 2014-05-22)
    Prescriptions regarding organization-scientific methodology are typically founded on the researcher’s ability to approach perfect rationality. In a critical examination of the use of scientific reasoning (deduction, induction, abduction) in organizational research, we seek to replace this unrealistic premise with an alternative that incorporates a more realistic view of the cognitive capacity of the researcher. Towards this end, we construct a typology of descriptive, prescriptive, and normative criteria for the evaluation of organization-scientific reasoning practices. This typology addresses both cognitive limits as well as the diversity of research approaches and research designs in organizational research. We make the case for incorporating not only the computational but also the cognitive element into both the reporting and the evaluation of scientific reasoning.
  • Suominen, Kimmo; Mantere, Saku (Hanken School of Economics, 2014-05-22)
    Although the managerial profession is subjugated by the discipline of strategic manage-ment, managers are not completely subordinate to it. Instead, they are able to use the in-stitutionalized discourse of strategic management, which is not their own product, in nov-el and creative ways. In this paper, we focus on the tactics that managers, as central strat-egy practitioners, use to consume strategy. Drawing on the work of the late Michel de Certeau as a theoretical lens, we conduct an empirical analysis of discourse, produced by 36 managers operating in three case organizations. This analysis allows us to elaborate on three different tactics of strategy consumption: instrumental, playful and intimate. The results capture the reciprocal dynamics between the micro and macro-levels of strategy discourse, that is, between strategic management as an institutional body of knowledge and the discursive practice of individual managers.
  • Hearn, Jeff (Sage Publications Ltd, 2014-05)