Management and Organisation

 

Nyligen publicerat

  • Hearn, Jeff (Akademie Ved Ceske Republiky * Sociologicky Ustav, 2014-08)
  • Swahnberg, Katarina; Davidsson-Simmons, Johanna; Hearn, Jeff; Wijma, Barbro (SAGE Publications, 2012)
  • Laakso, Mikael; Nyman, Linus (M D P I AG, 2016-02-06)
    It has long been argued that the Industry Foundation Classes (IFC) data model standard is the key to unlocking the potential of interoperable Building Information Modeling (BIM). Despite a wealth of published research literature incorporating IFC, there have been no attempts at systematically summarizing the literature related to the standard. Targeting both summation and analysis of thematic developments over time, we performed a comprehensive systematic literature review of IFC‐related research published between 1997 and 2007: the first 11 years of research on the standard. Through a systematic web‐retrieval process, 170 unique publications were collected, read, and mapped to a custom framework. The results reveal that journals and conferences have been an integral part of the technical evaluation and development of the standard. The full classification data is provided as an appendix to facilitate future research on IFC and other standards.
  • Raza-Ullah, Tatbeeq; Bengtsson, Maria; Kock, Sören (Elsevier Inc, 2014-02)
    This article explores the nature of the paradox inherent in coopetition; that is, the simultaneous pursuit of cooperation and competition between firms, and emanating tensions that develop at individual, organizational, and inter-organizational levels. We dissect the anatomy of the coopetition paradox to discover how it materializes by creating an external boundary (i.e., via unifying forces) and internal boundaries (i.e., via divergent forces). After explaining the coopetition paradox, we distinguish tension from paradox and submit that tension comprises both positive and negative emotions simultaneously, also known as emotional ambivalence. Finally, we recognize that emotional ambivalence in coopetition prevails at different levels, and vary in its level of intensity and persistency in relation to different contexts. We employ illustrative cases to ground our propositions empirically. This article provides understanding on concepts, expects to incite fruitful dialogue, and fuels further studies on inter-firm paradoxes.
  • Hearn, Jeff (Facultas Verlags- und Buchhandels AG WUV-Universitätsverlag, 2012)
  • Scambor, Elli; Bergmann, Nadja; Wojnicka, Katazyna; Belghiti-Mahut, Sophie; Hearn, Jeff; Holter, Öystein Gullvåg; Gärtner, Marc; Hrženjak, Majda; Scambor, Christian; White, Alan (SAGE Publications, 2014-12)
    E. Scambor, N. Bergmann, K. Wojnicka, S. Belghiti-Mahut, J. Hearn, Ø. G. Holter, M. Gärtner, M. Hrženjak, C. Scambor, and A. White
  • Hearn, Jeff (Sage Publications Ltd, 2014-05)
  • Hearn, Jeff (Emerald Group Publishing Ltd, 2014)
  • Hearn, Jeff (Universitetsforlaget AS, 2014)
  • Saarikko, Ted; Jonsson, Katrin; Burström, Thommie (2014-06-09)
    In platform ecosystems, the platform provider seeks to derive increasing returns over time as the ecosystem of backing actors grows more numerous. While a growing body of research has addressed the ecosystem strategies of large enterprises, less attention has been paid to small firms in the role of platform providers. As small firms do not possess the resources of large enterprises, they are not in a position to ignore the importance of immediate returns needed for the viability of the firm. In a case study, we study the entrepreneurial alertness of a small technology-based firm in promoting a platform for machine- to-machine communication. Our results suggest that balancing increasing and immediate returns requires a variety of entrepreneurial activities that encompasses strategic foresight and systemic insight on one hand, and exploratory and exploitative actions on the other. This paper contributes to our understanding of platform ecosystems by addressing the strategies of a small firm as an emerging platform provider.
  • Hanken School of Economics, Information Systems Science, Helsinki; Widenius, Michael (Monty); Nyman, Linus; (Talent First Network, 2015)
  • Sorsa, Ville-Pekka (Wiley-Blackwell Publishing Ltd, 2015-11-16)
    Over the last few decades, the boundary between public and private responsibility in old-age pension provisions has been redrawn throughout Europe. A new, public–private mix has emerged, not only in pension policy, but also in pension administration. The purpose of this article is to map and conduct a comparative analysis of the administrative design of public–private partnerships (PPPs) in European pension regimes, with a specific focus on how accountabilities are institutionally enforced within the PPP design. Previous literature has recognized accountability as an important factor in promoting trust in mandated pension schemes. However, as the literature on PPPs suggests, institutional arrangements of accountability are more complex in the case of PPPs than has been suggested by previous studies on pension administration. Thus, there is a need for further elaboration of existing comparative models. This study's analysis examines 19 old-age pension schemes that existed in 18 European countries at the beginning of 2013. The findings suggest that significant variations in accountability structures exist, even among schemes that are similar in terms of their pension policy targets. It is concluded that various schemes suffer from ineffective accountability structures that may compromise the legitimacy and sustainability of PPP-type pension schemes.
  • Laakso, Mikael; Kere, Juha (Tieteellisten Seurain Valtuuskunta, 2015)
  • Laakso, Mikael (University of Helsinki, 2015)
    Engagement in learning activities enhance the level of learning among students. However, when class sizes grow, such engagement can be difficult to achieve. The learning methods that work well in small classes might not work as well, or even be practically feasible, in large lecture halls. When students remain anonymous and cannot be given individual attention there is a challenge in ensuring high quality learning. In an attempt to address this challenge, the study explores ways to pro- mote active learning in the context of large lecture classes. Based on a review of the fundamentals of active learning in the literature, this article presents a range of methods that can be used to facilitate active learning among students in larger classes. Concluding the article is a description of a practical implementation where some of the suggested learning activities are applied and discussed in the context of an actual university course at the Hanken School of Economics taught by the author.