Phospholipolysis Caused by Different Types of Bacterial Phospholipases During Cold Storage of Bovine Raw Milk Is Prevented by N2 Gas Flushing

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Munsch-Alatossava , P , Käkelä , R , Ibarra , D , Youbi-Idrissi , M & Alatossava , T 2018 , ' Phospholipolysis Caused by Different Types of Bacterial Phospholipases During Cold Storage of Bovine Raw Milk Is Prevented by N 2 Gas Flushing ' , Frontiers in Microbiology , vol. 9 , 1307 . https://doi.org/10.3389/fmicb.2018.01307

Title: Phospholipolysis Caused by Different Types of Bacterial Phospholipases During Cold Storage of Bovine Raw Milk Is Prevented by N2 Gas Flushing
Author: Munsch-Alatossava, Patricia; Käkelä, Reijo; Ibarra, Dominique; Youbi-Idrissi, Mohammed; Alatossava, Tapani
Contributor: University of Helsinki, Molecular and Integrative Biosciences Research Programme
University of Helsinki, Department of Food and Nutrition
Date: 2018-06-19
Language: eng
Number of pages: 16
Belongs to series: Frontiers in Microbiology
ISSN: 1664-302X
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/10138/237854
Abstract: Cold storage aims to preserve the quality and safety of raw milk from farms to dairies; unfortunately, low temperatures also promote the growth of psychrotrophic bacteria, some of which produce heat-stable enzymes that cause spoilage of milk or dairy products. Previously, N-2 gas flushing of raw milk has demonstrated significant potential as a method to hinder bacterial growth at both laboratory and pilot plant scales. Using a mass spectrometry-based lipidomics approach, we examined the impact of cold storage [at 6 degrees C for up to 7 days, the control condition (C)], on the relative amounts of major phospholipids (phosphatidylethanolamine/PE, phosphatidylcholine/PC, phosphatidylserine/PS, phosphatidylinositol/PI, and sphingomyelin/SM) in three bovine raw milk samples, and compared it to the condition that received additional N-2 gas flushing (N). As expected, bacterial growth was hindered by the N-2-based treatment (over 4 log-units lower at day 7) compared to the non-treated control condition. At the end of the cold storage period, the control condition (C7) revealed higher hydrolysis of PC, SM, PE, and PS (the major species reached 27.2, 26.7, 34.6, and 9.9 mu M, respectively), compared to the N-2-flushed samples (N7) (the major species reached 55.6, 35.9, 54.0, and 18.8 mu M, respectively). C7 samples also exhibited a three-fold higher phosphatidic acid (PA) content (6.8 mu M) and a five-fold higher content (17.3 mu M) of lysophospholipids (LPE, LPC, LPS, and LPI) whereas both lysophospholipids and PA remained at their initial levels for 7 days in N7 samples. Taking into consideration the significant phospholipid losses in the controls, the lipid profiling results together with the microbiological data suggest a major role of phospholipase (PLase) C (PLC) in phospholipolysis during cold storage. However, the experimental data also indicate that bacterial sphingomyelinase C, together with PLases PLD and PLA contributed to the degradation of phospholipids present in raw milk as well, and potential contributions from PLB activity cannot be excluded. Altogether, this lipidomics study highlights the beneficial effects of N-2 flushing treatment on the quality and safety of raw milk through its ability to effectively hinder phospholipolysis during cold storage.
Subject: raw milk
cold storage
N-2 gas flushing
bacteria
lipidomics
phospholipids
phospholipases (PLases)
lysophospholipids
DAIRY-PRODUCTS
PSYCHROTROPHIC BACTERIA
FATTY-ACIDS
MICROBIOTA
LYSOPHOSPHATIDYLINOSITOL
MICROORGANISMS
ENZYMES
GROWTH
CELLS
1183 Plant biology, microbiology, virology
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