Maternal gut and breast milk microbiota affect infant gut antibiotic resistome and mobile genetic elements

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Pärnänen , K , Karkman , A , Hultman , J , Lyra , C , Bengtsson-Palme , J , Larsson , D G J , Rautava , S , Isolauri , E , Salminen , S , Kumar , H , Satokari , R & Virta , M 2018 , ' Maternal gut and breast milk microbiota affect infant gut antibiotic resistome and mobile genetic elements ' , Nature Communications , vol. 9 , 3891 . https://doi.org/10.1038/s41467-018-06393-w

Title: Maternal gut and breast milk microbiota affect infant gut antibiotic resistome and mobile genetic elements
Author: Pärnänen, Katariina; Karkman, Antti; Hultman, Jenni; Lyra, Christina; Bengtsson-Palme, Johan; Larsson, D. G. Joakim; Rautava, Samuli; Isolauri, Erika; Salminen, Seppo; Kumar, Himanshu; Satokari, Reetta; Virta, Marko
Other contributor: University of Helsinki, Department of Microbiology
University of Helsinki, Faculty of Biological and Environmental Sciences
University of Helsinki, Department of Microbiology
University of Helsinki, Department of Microbiology
University of Helsinki, Reetta Maria Satokari / Principal Investigator
University of Helsinki, Department of Microbiology







Date: 2018-09-24
Language: eng
Number of pages: 11
Belongs to series: Nature Communications
ISSN: 2041-1723
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1038/s41467-018-06393-w
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/10138/250564
Abstract: The infant gut microbiota has a high abundance of antibiotic resistance genes (ARGs) compared to adults, even in the absence of antibiotic exposure. Here we study potential sources of infant gut ARGs by performing metagenomic sequencing of breast milk, as well as infant and maternal gut microbiomes. We find that fecal ARG and mobile genetic element (MGE) profiles of infants are more similar to those of their own mothers than to those of unrelated mothers. MGEs in mothers' breast milk are also shared with their own infants. Termination of breastfeeding and intrapartum antibiotic prophylaxis of mothers, which have the potential to affect microbial community composition, are associated with higher abundances of specific ARGs, the composition of which is largely shaped by bacterial phylogeny in the infant gut. Our results suggest that infants inherit the legacy of past antibiotic consumption of their mothers via transmission of genes, but microbiota composition still strongly impacts the overall resistance load.
Subject: RESISTANCE GENES
NECROTIZING ENTEROCOLITIS
PRETERM INFANTS
READ ALIGNMENT
RIBOSOMAL-RNA
1ST YEAR
IDENTIFICATION
ASSOCIATION
DIVERSITY
WORLDWIDE
11832 Microbiology and virology
1184 Genetics, developmental biology, physiology
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