International consensus on the assessment of bruxism : Report of a work in progress

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Lobbezoo , F , Ahlberg , J , Raphael , K G , Wetselaar , P , Glaros , A G , Kato , T , Santiago , V , Winocur , E , De Laat , A , De Leeuw , R , Koyano , K , Lavigne , G J , Svensson , P & Manfredini , D 2018 , ' International consensus on the assessment of bruxism : Report of a work in progress ' , Journal of Oral Rehabilitation , vol. 45 , no. 11 , pp. 837-844 . https://doi.org/10.1111/joor.12663

Title: International consensus on the assessment of bruxism : Report of a work in progress
Author: Lobbezoo, F.; Ahlberg, J.; Raphael, K. G.; Wetselaar, P.; Glaros, A. G.; Kato, T.; Santiago, V.; Winocur, E.; De Laat, A.; De Leeuw, R.; Koyano, K.; Lavigne, G. J.; Svensson, P.; Manfredini, D.
Contributor: University of Helsinki, Clinicum
Date: 2018-11
Language: eng
Number of pages: 8
Belongs to series: Journal of Oral Rehabilitation
ISSN: 0305-182X
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/10138/253473
Abstract: In 2013, consensus was obtained on a definition of bruxism as repetitive masticatory muscle activity characterised by clenching or grinding of the teeth and/or by bracing or thrusting of the mandible and specified as either sleep bruxism or awake bruxism. In addition, a grading system was proposed to determine the likelihood that a certain assessment of bruxism actually yields a valid outcome. This study discusses the need for an updated consensus and has the following aims: (i) to further clarify the 2013 definition and to develop separate definitions for sleep and awake bruxism; (ii) to determine whether bruxism is a disorder rather than a behaviour that can be a risk factor for certain clinical conditions; (iii) to re-examine the 2013 grading system; and (iv) to develop a research agenda. It was concluded that: (i) sleep and awake bruxism are masticatory muscle activities that occur during sleep (characterised as rhythmic or non-rhythmic) and wakefulness (characterised by repetitive or sustained tooth contact and/or by bracing or thrusting of the mandible), respectively; (ii) in otherwise healthy individuals, bruxism should not be considered as a disorder, but rather as a behaviour that can be a risk (and/or protective) factor for certain clinical consequences; (iii) both non-instrumental approaches (notably self-report) and instrumental approaches (notably electromyography) can be employed to assess bruxism; and (iv) standard cut-off points for establishing the presence or absence of bruxism should not be used in otherwise healthy individuals; rather, bruxism-related masticatory muscle activities should be assessed in the behaviour's continuum.
Subject: assessment
awake bruxism
bruxism
clinical inspection
cut-off points
definition
electromyography
polysomnography
self-report
sleep bruxism
TEMPOROMANDIBULAR DISORDER PATIENTS
RESTLESS LEGS SYNDROME
SLEEP BRUXISM
MUSCLE-ACTIVITY
FACIAL-PAIN
TOOTH WEAR
SYMPTOMS
RISK
ASSOCIATION
VALIDITY
313 Dentistry
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