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  • Unknown author (Helsinki Collegium for Advanced Studies, 2015)
    19
  • Hakola, Outi (Helsinki Collegium for Advanced Studies, 2015)
    19
    COLLeGIUm’s 19th volume discusses mortality at the communal and personal levels of experience. The volume “Death and Mortality” emerges from the Human Mortality project (Helsinki Collegium for Advanced Studies 2011-2013), which provided a framework for discussing death, dying and mortality in an interdisciplinary network. This volume brings together, in particular, anthropological, philosophical, theological and historical perspectives. The writers - including Douglas Davies, Jeff McMahan, Kathryn Edwards and many others - discuss how (good/bad) death can be defined, understood and experienced in different cultural, political, social and historical contexts
  • Pajari, Ilona (Helsinki Collegium for Advanced Studies, 2015)
    19
  • McMahan, Jeff (Helsinki Collegium for Advanced Studies, 2015)
    19
  • Ronikonmäki, Hanna (Helsinki Collegium for Advanced Studies, 2015)
    19
  • Lizza, John P. (Helsinki Collegium for Advanced Studies, 2015)
    19
  • Heinämaa, Sara (Helsinki Collegium for Advanced Studies, 2015)
    19
  • Lenkewitz, Anna (Helsinki Collegium for Advanced Studies, 2015)
    19
  • Davies, Douglas J. (Helsinki Collegium for Advanced Studies, 2015)
    19
  • Esser, Andrea Marlen (Helsinki Collegium for Advanced Studies, 2015)
    19
  • Unknown author (Helsinki Collegium for Advanced Studies, 2015)
    19
  • Yurchak, Alexei (Helsinki Collegium for Advanced Studies, 2015)
    19
  • Pihlström, Sami (Helsinki Collegium for Advanced Studies, 2015)
    19
  • Unknown author (Helsinki Collegium for Advanced Studies, 2015)
    18
  • Korpiola, Mia; Lahtinen, Anu (Helsinki Collegium for Advanced Studies, 2015)
    18
  • Aldrin, Viktor (Helsinki Collegium for Advanced Studies, 2015)
    18
    This article focuses on expressions of bereavement and religious coping in medieval miracle stories from Sweden. The stories come from the collections of St. Birgitta (Bridget) of Sweden, the Blessed Bishop Nicolaus Hermanni (Sw. Nils Hermansson) of Linköping and the Blessed Katarina of Vadstena, and were recorded in the fourteenth and fifteenth centuries. Catherine M. Sanders’s modern five stages of bereavement have been used as the theory of analysis through Kay Talbot’s adaptation of the theory for parents in grief. This theoretical foundation has provided new insights into how parental grief was expressed in medieval Sweden – and in stark contrast to Continental research on the same topic. Parents of both sexes expressed their grief outwardly through tears and crying, and a reluctance to accept that their children were dead. Throughout the miracle stories, lay people constructed their own prayers for miraculous intervention without the aid of any priests. This makes fathers and mothers in medieval Sweden agents of their own in terms of praying to God and being able to construct their own forms of religious coping.
  • Korpiola, Mia; Lahtinen, Anu (Helsinki Collegium for Advanced Studies, 2015)
    18
  • Wojciechowska, Beata (Helsinki Collegium for Advanced Studies, 2015)
    18
    In the Middle Ages, Polish Christian holidays remained consistent, except for minor temporary deviations. They included the basic structure of pre-Christian rituals. Yet, traces of the old Slavic ritual calendar can be clearly identified in the Polish and Czech sources from the fourteenth- and fifteenth-centuries. Those were rituals and practices of the ancient, broad context of beliefs which confirmed that certain traditional attitudes and behaviour were still very much alive. The Slavic calendar of annual rites was consistent with the crucial moments of the solar cycle. The whole year was imbued with ritual contacts with the dead, waiting for their arrival, presence, and supporting them in various established ways. Traditional beliefs and practices intertwined with the dominant Christian behaviour and attitudes associated with death and funerals, as well as the methods recommended by the Church to support the soul of the deceased. A Christian funeral, crucial for the salvation of the dead, consisted of ritual celebrations, gestures and a series of prayers recited for the deceased. The circle of beliefs and ideas about the other world was an area where religious syncretism was very clear even many centuries after the initial Christianization. The remaining fragments of the ancient Slavic conceptions of the afterlife, plucked from the once coherent systems, still coexisted with the assimilated threads of Christian teaching in the waning centuries of the Middle Ages. They were expressed in the efforts to secure well-being, supernatural care and the integration with dead ancestors.
  • Ridder, Iris (Helsinki Collegium for Advanced Studies, 2015)
    18
    In the early seventeenth century, the city of Falun was among the most important cities in Sweden because of its profitable copper mine, called Stora Kopparberget (the Great Copper Mountain). Working as a miner was, particularly in this period, a dangerous profession with high risks. The lives of the miners were frequently exposed to the unpredictability of this dangerous work, and mine accidents were a constant peril. During the Middle Ages and the early modern period, both the accidents and misfortune which befell the miners as well as their successes and wealth were seen as expressions of God’s plan for salvation. People therefore often turned their faith into religious or magical strategies in their effort to protect their lives. The aim of this article is to highlight the connection between dicing and dying in early modern mining industry by analysing an oracular dice game book for miners, printed in Stockholm in 1613. A local mining clerk, Gisle Jacobson, published the text, entitled Ett litet Tidhfördriff (A small pastime), which exploits the peculiar fact that the miners at Stora Kopparberg made decisions with the help of a ritualized dice game.