Soil vapor extraction of wet gasoline-contaminated soil made possible by electroosmotic dewatering-lab simulations applied at a field site

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http://hdl.handle.net/10138/259416

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Simpanen , S , Yu , D , Mäkelä , R , Talvenmaki , H , Sinkkonen , A , Silvennoinen , H & Romantschuk , M 2018 , ' Soil vapor extraction of wet gasoline-contaminated soil made possible by electroosmotic dewatering-lab simulations applied at a field site ' , Journal of Soils and Sediments , vol. 18 , no. 11 , pp. 3303-3309 . https://doi.org/10.1007/s11368-017-1717-1

Title: Soil vapor extraction of wet gasoline-contaminated soil made possible by electroosmotic dewatering-lab simulations applied at a field site
Author: Simpanen, Suvi; Yu, Dan; Mäkelä, Riikka; Talvenmaki, Harri; Sinkkonen, Aki; Silvennoinen, Hannu; Romantschuk, Martin
Contributor: University of Helsinki, Environmental Sciences
University of Helsinki, Environmental Sciences
University of Helsinki, Ecosystems and Environment Research Programme
University of Helsinki, Ecosystems and Environment Research Programme
University of Helsinki, Helsinki Institute of Sustainability Science (HELSUS)
Date: 2018-11
Language: eng
Number of pages: 7
Belongs to series: Journal of Soils and Sediments
ISSN: 1439-0108
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/10138/259416
Abstract: PurposeSoil restoration is still mainly carried out ex situ by excavating and replacing the contaminated soil. In situ remediation would reduce the costs of soil transportation and this way, the problem is not merely transferred elsewhere. The present study introduces a field case where the aged, oil-contaminated soil in a former fuel station in Finland was treated in situ sequentially with different methods.Materials and methodsSeveral approaches, including soil vapor extraction and biostimulation with electrokinetic pumping, were performed in the field. After these treatments, the dense original portion of the soil beneath the gasoline pump location, ca 100m(3), was still contaminated with petroleum-derived volatile organic compounds (VOCs), with concentrations of nearly 10,000mgkg(-1) measured at some hotspots. After a period of electroosmotic water circulation, the electrical field (0.5Vcm(-1), DC) was kept connected for 6months without addition of water, leading to dewatering and warming of the soil.Results and discussionIn contrast to the situation with the original wet soil, VOCs, in lab conditions, were found to volatilize very efficiently from the dewatered soil. When the soil vapor extraction treatment was renewed using perforated tubing installed horizontally at ca 1m depth in the dewatered soil at the contaminated site, the treatment was efficient and the soil was decontaminated in 5months. The final VOC concentrations were on average 190mgkg(-1) (n=13) with the highest value of 700mgkg(-1) at one hotspot. After a risk evaluation, the site was concluded to be sufficiently clean for industrial use.ConclusionsSince with many former fuel stations, the contamination consists of both volatile fractions that are difficult to degrade by biological means and heavier compounds for which biostimulation is often suitable, a combination of different methods may be worth pursuing.
Subject: Oil hydrocarbon contamination
Soil remediation
Electrokinetic remediation
AIR PERMEABILITY
BIOREMEDIATION
REMEDIATION
1171 Geosciences
1172 Environmental sciences
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