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  • Chatrchyan, Serguei; Anttila, Erkki; Czellar, Sandor; Härkönen, J.; Heikkinen, A.; Karimäki, V.; Kinnunen, R.; Klem, J.; Kortelainen, M.J.; Lampén, T.; Lassila-Perini, K.; Lehti, S.; Lindén, T.; Luukka, Panja; Mäenpää, T.; Nysten, J.; Tuominen, E.; Tuominiemi, J.; Ungaro, D.; Wendland, L.; CMS Collaboration (INSTITUTE OF PHYSICS PUBLISHING, 2010)
  • Salmela, Leena; Tarhio, Jorma (Heidelberg, Berlin, Springer Verlag,, 2010)
  • Bimbo, Luis M.; Sarparanta, Mirkka; Santos, Helder A.; Airaksinen, Anu J.; Makila, Ermei; Laaksonen, Timo; Peltonen, Leena; Lehto, Vesa-Pekka; Hirvonen, Jouni; Salonen, Jarno (AMERICAN CHEMICAL SOCIETY., 2010)
  • Durian, Branislav; Peltola, Hannu; Salmela, Leena; Tarhio, Jorma (2010)
  • Laaksoharju, Taina; Rappe, Erja (2010)
    There is considerable evidence that children in modern society are losing<br/>their contact with nature and, more precisely, with green plants. Is this also the case in Finland, a northern country famous for its forests and wild nature? This study examines the relationship of 9- to 10-year-old Finnish schoolchildren with the green environment and plants. The data were gathered by a questionnaire<br/>comprising structured and open-ended questions. The focus of the research was on two comparisons: first, on the nature and child relationship in rural and urban neighborhoods and, second, among boys and girls. Participants in the study amounted to a total of 76 children, 42 in the Helsinki suburb area and 34 in Paltamo. The results suggested that the children in rural surroundings had closer contact with nature than their urban associates. For example, the children of Paltamo reported to know the trees better, and considered human beings to be part of nature more often (100% vs. 76% of the pupils in Helsinki, P = 0,003). Similarly, the results showed that girls in the study (N = 48) were more interested in plants than boys (N = 28). For the girls, the beauty and joy of plants was important, whereas the boys appreciated plants as the source of life. After the pre-questioning, the children of Helsinki participated in an in-class horticultural intervention and 10 days later, answered a similar questionnaire again. The results of the open-ended questions revealed that equally to children in other Western countries, Finnish children may also be in danger of losing their direct contact with the natural environment. It was common to pass free time in organized sports such as hockey or football (boys), or by just walking and talking with friends (girls). Rural children told that they still built huts, pick berries, and climb trees, whereas urban children played in parks and city groves. The results suggest that it is essential to research<br/>further the children’s own experiences if we are to understand, and subsequently, to enhance, the crucial role of the green environment in their lives. Horticultural interventions can be effective starting points to add to children’s knowledge, affection, and interest toward greenery, but it is highly recommended that they take place outdoors rather than indoors.
  • Laaksoharju, Taina; Rappe, Erja (2010)
    There is considerable evidence that children in modern society are losing<br/>their contact with nature and, more precisely, with green plants. Is this also the case in Finland, a northern country famous for its forests and wild nature? This study examines the relationship of 9- to 10-year-old Finnish schoolchildren with the green environment and plants. The data were gathered by a questionnaire<br/>comprising structured and open-ended questions. The focus of the research was on two comparisons: first, on the nature and child relationship in rural and urban neighborhoods and, second, among boys and girls. Participants in the study amounted to a total of 76 children, 42 in the Helsinki suburb area and 34 in Paltamo. The results suggested that the children in rural surroundings had closer contact with nature than their urban associates. For example, the children of Paltamo reported to know the trees better, and considered human beings to be part of nature more often (100% vs. 76% of the pupils in Helsinki, P = 0,003). Similarly, the results showed that girls in the study (N = 48) were more interested in plants than boys (N = 28). For the girls, the beauty and joy of plants was important, whereas the boys appreciated plants as the source of life. After the pre-questioning, the children of Helsinki participated in an in-class horticultural intervention and 10 days later, answered a similar questionnaire again. The results of the open-ended questions revealed that equally to children in other Western countries, Finnish children may also be in danger of losing their direct contact with the natural environment. It was common to pass free time in organized sports such as hockey or football (boys), or by just walking and talking with friends (girls). Rural children told that they still built huts, pick berries, and climb trees, whereas urban children played in parks and city groves. The results suggest that it is essential to research<br/>further the children’s own experiences if we are to understand, and subsequently, to enhance, the crucial role of the green environment in their lives. Horticultural interventions can be effective starting points to add to children’s knowledge, affection, and interest toward greenery, but it is highly recommended that they take place outdoors rather than indoors.
  • Hämäläinen, Wilhelmiina; Vinni, Mikko (CRC Press, 2010)
  • Chatrchyan, Serguei; Anttila, Erkki; Czellar, Sandor; Härkönen, Jaakko; Heikkinen, Mika Aatos; Karimäki, Veikko; Kinnunen, Ritva; Klem, Jukka; Kortelainen, Matti; Lampen, Pekka Tapio; Lassila-Perini, Katri Marjaana; Lehti, Sami Tapio; Linden, Tomas; Luukka, Panja; Mäenpää, Teppo H; Nysten, Jukka Sakari; Tuominen, Eija; Tuominiemi, Jorma; Ungaro, Donatella; Wendland, Lauri Andreas; CMS Collaboration (INSTITUTE OF PHYSICS PUBLISHING, 2010)
  • Fagerholm, Fabian; Taina, Juha (2008)
    A key trait of Free and Open Source Software (FOSS) development is its distributed nature. Nevertheless, two project-level operations, the fork and the merge of program code, are among the least well understood events in the lifespan of a FOSS project. Some projects have explicitly adopted these operations as the primary means of concurrent development. In this study, we examine the effect of highly distributed software development, is found in the Linux kernel project, on collection and modelling of software development data. We find that distributed development calls for sophisticated temporal modelling techniques where several versions of the source code tree can exist at once. Attention must be turned towards the methods of quality assurance and peer review that projects employ to manage these parallel source trees. Our analysis indicates that two new metrics, fork rate and merge rate, could be useful for determining the role of distributed version control systems in FOSS projects. The study presents a preliminary data set consisting of version control and mailing list data.
  • Chatrchyan, S.; Anttila, E.; Czellar, S.; Härkönen, J.; Heikkinen, A.; Karimäki, V.; Kinnunen, R.; Klem, J.; Kortelainen, M. J.; Lampén, T.; Lassila-Perini, K.; Lehti, S.; Lindén, T.; Luukka, P.; Mäenpää, T.; Nysten, J.; Tuominen, E.; Tuominiemi, J.; Ungaro, D.; Wendland, L.; CMS Collaboration (INSTITUTE OF PHYSICS PUBLISHING, 2010)
  • Kotilainen, Marja-Riitta (2010)
    In Finland, there is a desperate need for flexible, reliable and functional multi-e-learning settings for pupils aged 11-13. Southern Finland has several ongoing e-learning projects, but none that develop a multiple setting, with learning and teaching occurring between more than two schools. In 2006, internet connections were not broadband and data transfer was mainly audio data. Connections and technical problems occurred, which were an obstacle to multi-e-learning. Internet connections today enable web-based learning in major parts of <br/>Lapland and by 2015, broadband will reach even the remotest villages up north. Therefore, it is important to research the possibilities of multi-e-learning and to build collaborative, learner-centred, versatile network models for primary school-aged pupils. The resulting model will facilitate distance learning to extend education to rural, sparsely populated areas, and it will give a model of using mobile devices in language portfolios. This will promote regional equality and prevent exclusion. Working with portfolios provides the opportunity to develop mobility from a pedagogical point of view. It is important to study the pros and cons of mobile devices in producing artefacts on portfolios in e-learning and language learning settings. <br/>The current study represents a design-based research approach. The design research approach includes two important aspects concerning the current research: ‘a teacher as researcher’ aspect, which means there is the possibility to be strongly involved in developing processes and an obstacle-aspect, which means that problems while developing, are seen as a <br/>promoter in evolving the designed model, as apposed to negative results.
  • Koivunoro, Hanna; Hyvönen, Heini; Uusi-Simola, Jouni; Jokelainen, Ilkka; Kosunen, Antti; Kortesniemi, Mika; Seppälä, Tiina; Auterinen, Iiro; Savolainen, Sauli (2010)
  • Koivunoro, Hanna; Hyvönen, Heini; Uusi-Simola, Jouni; Jokelainen, Ilkka; Kosunen, Antti; Kortesniemi, Mika; Seppälä, Tiina; Auterinen, Iiro; Savolainen, Sauli (2010)
  • Hadley, Jonathan (2010)
    Argues that focus on the immigrant status of the Espoo shooter deflects attention from the failure of the relevant authorities to effectively respond to a foreseeable threat to public safety. Response to public discussion of New Year's Day shootings in Espoo shopping mall.
  • Havu, Katri (The University of Edinburgh School of Law, 2010)
  • Karlstedt, Mika; Raatikainen, Kimmo (2007)