Night work and risk of common mental disorders : analyzing observational data as a non-randomized pseudo trial

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http://hdl.handle.net/10138/262538

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Beltagy , M S , Pentti , J , Vahtera , J & Kivimaki , M 2018 , ' Night work and risk of common mental disorders : analyzing observational data as a non-randomized pseudo trial ' , Scandinavian Journal of Work, Environment & Health , vol. 44 , no. 5 , pp. 512-520 . https://doi.org/10.5271/sjweh.3733

Title: Night work and risk of common mental disorders : analyzing observational data as a non-randomized pseudo trial
Author: Beltagy, Marwa S.; Pentti, Jaana; Vahtera, Jussi; Kivimaki, Mika
Contributor: University of Helsinki, Department of Public Health
University of Helsinki, Department of Public Health
University of Helsinki, Department of Public Health
Date: 2018
Language: eng
Number of pages: 9
Belongs to series: Scandinavian Journal of Work, Environment & Health
ISSN: 0355-3140
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/10138/262538
Abstract: Objectives The aim of this study was to examine the status of night work as a risk factor for common mental disorders (CMD). Methods A cohort study with three data waves was conducted on populations of social and healthcare employees for a duration of eight years (total N=46 010). Data were analyzed as a non-randomized pseudo trial to examine (i) whether moving from non-night work to night work is associated with the development of CMD, (ii) the extent to which moving back to non-night work biases this association and (iii) whether moving from night to non-night work is associated with the recovery from CMD. Results According to logistic regression with generalized estimating equation and without bias-correction, changing to night work was not associated with the odds of acquiring CMD [odds ratio (OR) 1.03, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.82-1.30]. However, night workers with CMD had higher odds of recovery from CMD when changing to non-night work compared to continuing night work (1.99, 95% CI 1.20-3.28). When night workers developed CMD, the odds of moving back to non-night work increased by 68%. In analyses corrected for this bias, changing from non-night to night work was associated with a 1.25-fold (95% CI 1.03-1.52) increased odds of acquiring CMD. Conclusions A change from non-night to night work may increase the risk of CMD, while moving back from night to non-night work increased recovery from CMD.
Subject: anxiety
depression
mental health
occupational health
shift work
shift worker
stress
working hour
CORONARY-HEART-DISEASE
SHIFT WORK
HEALTH
ASSOCIATION
PREVALENCE
COMPLAINTS
NURSES
COHORT
KOREA
3142 Public health care science, environmental and occupational health
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