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  • Teller, Christoph; Kotzab, Herbert; Grant, David B. (2012-05)
  • Kovacs, Gyöngyi; Spens, Karen (Inderscience Publishers, 2010)
  • Butt, Hilal; Virk, Nader Shahzad (Wiley-Blackwell Publishing Ltd, 2014-03-02)
    This paper presents a simplified single period asset-pricing model adjusted for liquidity and tests it for the Nordic markets. The detailed empirical evidence is presented from Finnish test case. Empirical testing of small yet developed markets is motivated by the increased relevance of the illiquidity effect for illiquid assets/markets. The main evidence reports liquidity risk makes sufficiently larger part of predicted factor risk premium than the market risk, contrary to comparable US evidence. This highlights the ability of liquidity related model betas in capturing the time variation in expected returns across illiquid (Nordic) markets than market beta.
  • Wilén, Kristoffer Bernhard (Vasemmistofoorumi, 2012)
  • Stenbacka, Rune; Tombak, Mihkel (Elsevier BV * North-Holland, 2012)
  • Aaltonen, Aleksi (2011)
    How does a new medium create its audience? This study takes the business model of commercial media as its starting point and identifies industrial audience measurement as a constitutive operation in creating the sellable asset of advertising- funded companies. The study employs a qualitative case study design to analyse how a mobile virtual network operator (MVNO) company harnesses digital behavioural records generated by computational network infrastructure to turn network subscribers into an advertising audience product. The empirical evidence is based on a three-months intensive fieldwork at the company office. The analysis reveals comprehensiveness, openness and granularity as the historically new attributes of computational data vis-à-vis traditional audience measurement arrangements. These attributes are then juxtaposed with four kinds of business analytical operations (automatic data aggregation procedures, the use of software reporting tools, organizational reporting practices and custom analyses) observed at the research site to assess how does computational media environment rule key audiencemaking practices. Finally, the implications of this analytical infrastructure are reflected upon three sets of organizational practices. The theoretical framework for the analysis is composed by critically assessing constructivist approaches (SCOT, ANT and sociomateriality) for studying technology and by discussing an approach inspired by critical realism to overcome their limitations with respect to the objectives of the study. The findings contribute toward innovating new digital services, information systems (IS) theory and the study of media audiences. The case opens up considerable complexity involved in establishing a new kind of advertising audience and, more generally, a platform business. Sending out advertisements is easy compared to demonstrating that somebody is actually receiving them. The three computational attributes both extend and provide summative validity for mid-range theorizing on how computational objects mediate organizational practices and processes. Finally, the analysis reveals an interactive nature of digital audience stemming from the direct and immediate behavioural feedback in an audiencemaking cycle.
  • Diaz Ruiz, Carlos; Kowalkowski, Christian (Elsevier Inc, 2014)
    A central question in industrial marketing is whether the form in which the external environment of a firm is represented influences the marketing strategy. This influence has been studied generally through case study research, and quantitative evidence is limited. In response to this limitation, this paper reports on a quasi-experiment investigating whether market representations have a constructive aspect in business. Empirically, this study compares two types of ostensive and performative market representations—service focus and product differentiation—in order to test for influence exacted by industrial marketing on strategies. Results indicate that service focus is selected when market representations rely on agency in firms (i.e., performative), and product strategies are selected when structures are emphasized (i.e., ostensive). This paper contributes to methodology development by expanding the link between a case study approach and quasi-experiments explaining how quasi-experiments can replicate findings in industrial marketing.
  • Lindman, Juho; Rossi, Matti; Puustell, Anna (I E E E, 2011-08)
    Choosing Open Source Software License and Corresponding Business Model
  • Scambor, Elli; Bergmann, Nadja; Wojnicka, Katazyna; Belghiti-Mahut, Sophie; Hearn, Jeff; Holter, Öystein Gullvåg; Gärtner, Marc; Hrženjak, Majda; Scambor, Christian; White, Alan (SAGE Publications, 2014-12)
    E. Scambor, N. Bergmann, K. Wojnicka, S. Belghiti-Mahut, J. Hearn, Ø. G. Holter, M. Gärtner, M. Hrženjak, C. Scambor, and A. White
  • Hearn, Jeff (Universitetsforlaget AS, 2014)
  • Hearn, Jeff (Facultas Verlags- und Buchhandels AG WUV-Universitätsverlag, 2012)
  • Swahnberg, Katarina; Davidsson-Simmons, Johanna; Hearn, Jeff; Wijma, Barbro (SAGE Publications, 2012)
  • Spens, Karen; Kovacs, Gyöngyi (Emerald Group Publishing, 2012)
  • Laamanen, Mikko; Wahlen, Stefan; Campana, Mario (Wiley-Blackwell Publishing Ltd, 2015)
  • Edvardsson, Bo; Kowalkowski, Christian; Strandvik, Tore; Voima, Päivi (Emerald Group Publishing Ltd, 2014)
  • Herlin, Heidi; Pazirandeh, Ala (UNOPS - United Nations Office for Project Services, 2010)
  • Hearn, Jeff (Emerald Group Publishing Ltd, 2014)
  • Lindman, Juho (Association for Information Systems, 2015-08-18)
  • Björk, Bo-Christer (M D P I AG, 2013)
  • Björk, Bo-Christer (John Wiley & Sons, Inc, 2014)
    Subject repositories are open web collections of working papers or manuscript copies of published scholarly articles, specific to particular scientific disciplines. The first repositories emerged already in the early 1990’s and in some fields of science they have become an important channel for the dissemination of research results. Using quite strict inclusion criteria 56 subject repositories were identified from a much larger number indexed in two repository indexes. A closer study of these demonstrated a huge variety in sizes, organizational models, functions and topics. When they first started to emerge subject repositories catered to a strong market demand, but the later development of Internet search engines, the rapid growth of institutional repositories and the tightening up of journal publisher OA policies seems to be slowing down their growth.