Browsing by Title

Sort by: Order: Results:

Now showing items 73-92 of 141
  • Kovacs, Gyöngyi; Spens, Karen (Inderscience Publishers, 2010)
  • Butt, Hilal; Virk, Nader Shahzad (Wiley-Blackwell Publishing Ltd., 2014-03-02)
    This paper presents a simplified single period asset-pricing model adjusted for liquidity and tests it for the Nordic markets. The detailed empirical evidence is presented from Finnish test case. Empirical testing of small yet developed markets is motivated by the increased relevance of the illiquidity effect for illiquid assets/markets. The main evidence reports liquidity risk makes sufficiently larger part of predicted factor risk premium than the market risk, contrary to comparable US evidence. This highlights the ability of liquidity related model betas in capturing the time variation in expected returns across illiquid (Nordic) markets than market beta.
  • Wilén, Kristoffer Bernhard (Vasemmistofoorumi, 2012)
  • Aaltonen, Aleksi (2011)
    How does a new medium create its audience? This study takes the business model of commercial media as its starting point and identifies industrial audience measurement as a constitutive operation in creating the sellable asset of advertising- funded companies. The study employs a qualitative case study design to analyse how a mobile virtual network operator (MVNO) company harnesses digital behavioural records generated by computational network infrastructure to turn network subscribers into an advertising audience product. The empirical evidence is based on a three-months intensive fieldwork at the company office. The analysis reveals comprehensiveness, openness and granularity as the historically new attributes of computational data vis-à-vis traditional audience measurement arrangements. These attributes are then juxtaposed with four kinds of business analytical operations (automatic data aggregation procedures, the use of software reporting tools, organizational reporting practices and custom analyses) observed at the research site to assess how does computational media environment rule key audiencemaking practices. Finally, the implications of this analytical infrastructure are reflected upon three sets of organizational practices. The theoretical framework for the analysis is composed by critically assessing constructivist approaches (SCOT, ANT and sociomateriality) for studying technology and by discussing an approach inspired by critical realism to overcome their limitations with respect to the objectives of the study. The findings contribute toward innovating new digital services, information systems (IS) theory and the study of media audiences. The case opens up considerable complexity involved in establishing a new kind of advertising audience and, more generally, a platform business. Sending out advertisements is easy compared to demonstrating that somebody is actually receiving them. The three computational attributes both extend and provide summative validity for mid-range theorizing on how computational objects mediate organizational practices and processes. Finally, the analysis reveals an interactive nature of digital audience stemming from the direct and immediate behavioural feedback in an audiencemaking cycle.
  • Diaz Ruiz, Carlos; Kowalkowski, Christian (Elsevier Inc., 2014)
    A central question in industrial marketing is whether the form in which the external environment of a firm is represented influences the marketing strategy. This influence has been studied generally through case study research, and quantitative evidence is limited. In response to this limitation, this paper reports on a quasi-experiment investigating whether market representations have a constructive aspect in business. Empirically, this study compares two types of ostensive and performative market representations—service focus and product differentiation—in order to test for influence exacted by industrial marketing on strategies. Results indicate that service focus is selected when market representations rely on agency in firms (i.e., performative), and product strategies are selected when structures are emphasized (i.e., ostensive). This paper contributes to methodology development by expanding the link between a case study approach and quasi-experiments explaining how quasi-experiments can replicate findings in industrial marketing.
  • Lindman, Juho; Rossi, Matti; Puustell, Anna (I E E E, 2011-08)
    Choosing Open Source Software License and Corresponding Business Model
  • Spens, Karen; Kovacs, Gyöngyi (Emerald Group Publishing, 2012)
  • Edvardsson, Bo; Kowalkowski, Christian; Strandvik, Tore; Voima, Päivi (Emerald Group Publishing Ltd., 2014)
  • Herlin, Heidi; Pazirandeh, Ala (UNOPS, 2010)
  • Lindman, Juho (AIS, 2015-08-18)
  • Björk, Bo-Christer (M D P I AG, 2013)
  • Björk, Bo-Christer (John Wiley & Sons, Inc., 2014)
    Subject repositories are open web collections of working papers or manuscript copies of published scholarly articles, specific to particular scientific disciplines. The first repositories emerged already in the early 1990’s and in some fields of science they have become an important channel for the dissemination of research results. Using quite strict inclusion criteria 56 subject repositories were identified from a much larger number indexed in two repository indexes. A closer study of these demonstrated a huge variety in sizes, organizational models, functions and topics. When they first started to emerge subject repositories catered to a strong market demand, but the later development of Internet search engines, the rapid growth of institutional repositories and the tightening up of journal publisher OA policies seems to be slowing down their growth.
  • Björk, Bo-Christer; Solomon, David (BioMed Central Ltd., 2012-07-17)
    Background In the past few years there has been an ongoing debate as to whether the proliferation of Open Access (OA) publishing would damage the peer review system and put the quality of scientific journal publishing at risk. Our aim was to inform this debate by comparing the scientific impact and quality of Open Access with subscription journals controlling for journal age, the country of the publisher, discipline and for OA publishers their business model. Methods Two-year impact factors (the average number of citations to the articles in a journal) were used as a proxy for scientific impact. The Directory of Open Access Journals (DOAJ) was used to identify OA journals as well as their business model. Journal age and discipline were obtained from the Ulrich’s periodicals directory. Comparisons were done on the journal level as well as on the article level where the results were weighted by the number of articles published in a journal. Six hundred and ten OA journals were compared with 7,609 subscription journals using Web of Science citation data while an overlapping set of 1,327 OA journals were compared with 11,124 subscription journals using Scopus data. Results Overall average citation rates, both unweighted and weighted for the number of articles per journal, were about 30% higher for subscription journals. However after controlling for discipline (medicine and health versus other), age of the journal (three time periods) and the location of the publisher (four largest publishing countries versus other countries) the differences largely disappeared in most subcategories except for journals which had been launched prior to 1996. OA journals that fund publishing with article processing charges (APCs) are on average more cited than other OA journals. In Medicine and health OA journals founded in the last ten years are receiving about as many citations as subscription journals launched during the same period. Conclusions Our results indicate that OA journals indexed in Web of Science and/or Scopus are approaching the same scientific impact and quality as subscription journals particularly in biomedicine and for journals funded by article processing charges.
  • Lindman, Juho; Rossi, Matti; Tuunainen, Virpi (2013-01-10)
  • Lindman, Juho; Riepula, Mikko; Rossi, Matti; Marttiin, Pentti (Springer, 2013)
  • Maley, Jane; Kowalkowski, Christian; Brege, Staffan; Biggemann, Sergio (Emerald, 2015)
    Purpose The aim of the article is to analyze the rationale for choice of suppliers and the influence these decisions have on the firm’s capabilities. Design/methodology/approach We examine the choice of in-house operations versus buying maintenance in the Swedish mining industry through a qualitative case study approach. Findings The findings reveal a strong tendency to outsource maintenance. Research limitations/implications This in turn has a strong influence on the firm’s capabilities and long-term competitive advantage and sustainability. Practical implications Based on the empirical findings, we comment on the strength and weaknesses of the different outsourcing and attempt to find practical solutions that assist the firm in creating competitive advantage. Originality/value The unique contribution of this study is that it extends prior firm capabilities studies by investigating the impact of capability loss specifically in complex, intricate maintenance processes in a dynamic industry.
  • Holmlund, Maria; Strandvik, Tore (Emerald Group Publishing, 1999)
  • Björk, Bo-Christer; Solomon, David (Association of Learned and Professional Society Publishers, 2012)
    The article processing charge (APC) is currently the primary method of funding Open Access peer reviewed journals. The pricing principles of 77 OA publishers publishing over 1000 journals using APCs were studied and classified. The most common method is the fixed single fee, which can either be the same for all of a publisher’s journals or individually determined for each journal. Fees are usually only levied for publication of accepted papers, but there are some journals that also charge for submission. Instead of fixed prices many publishers charge by the page or have multi-tiered fees depending on the length of articles. The country of origin of the author can also influence the pricing, in order to facilitate publishing for authors from developing countries.
  • Solomon, David; Björk, Bo-Christer (John Wiley & Sons, Inc., 2012)
    Open access (OA) journals distribute their content at no charge and use other means of funding the publication process. Publication fees or article processing charges (APC)s have become the predominant means for funding professional OA publishing. We surveyed 1,038 authors who recently published articles in 74 OA journals that charge APCs stratified into seven discipline categories. Authors were asked about the source of funding for the APC, factors influencing their choice of a journal and past history publishing in OA and subscription journals. Additional information about the journal and the authors’ country were obtained from the journal website. A total of 429 (41%) authors from 69 journals completed the survey. There were large differences in the source of funding among disciplines. Journals with impact factors charged higher APCs as did journals from disciplines where grant funding is plentiful. Fit, quality, and speed of publication where the most important factors in the authors’ choice of a journal. Open access was less important but a significant factor for many authors in their choice of a journal to publish. These findings are consistent with other research on OA publishing and suggest OA publishing funded through APCs is likely to continue to grow.
  • Lee, Nari (Edward Elgar Publishing, 2014)