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  • Kovacs, Gyöngyi; Tatham, Peter (Hanken School of Economics, 2010)
  • Aaltonen, Aleksi (Yhdyskuntasuunnittelun seura (YSS) ry, 2006)
  • den Hond, F. (Sage Publications, 2010)
  • Korkeamäki, Timo; Rainio, Elina; Takalo, Tuomas (Wiley-Blackwell Publishing, 2013-07)
  • Diaz Ruiz, Carlos Adrian (2011-07-07)
  • Rehme, Jakob; Kowalkowski, Christian; Nordigården, Daniel (Emerald Group Publishing Ltd., 2013)
    Purpose: The existing literature on key account management (KAM) has focused more on sales forces and management levels than on their evolution. This study explores how sales activities can be coordinated to accommodate national and international KAM programs. Design/methodology/approach: A longitudinal study of the industrial conglomerate ABB 1996–2008. Findings: The diversity associated with geography and product complexity creates demands for a more flexible organization that can provide a more complete offering portfolio across national boundaries and still handle the demands of local organizations. In addition to internal organizational contingencies, the key factors and driving forces for the development of KAM programs are the marketing and purchasing strategies that buyer and seller firms perceive and encounter. Research limitations/implications: The data is limited to one corporation and some of its key customers in different industries. Although the internal and construct validity of the findings are strong, the external validity cannot be assessed precisely. Originality/value: The 12-year study brings valuable insights to the development of KAM programs in multinational corporations and addresses coordination issues related to geographical and product complexity.
  • Manai, Aicha; Holmlund, Maria (Emerald, 2015-08-01)
  • Holmlund, Maria; Hobbs, Päivi (Emerald Group Publishing Ltd., 2009)
  • Neganova, Irina (2014-06)
    Purpose: to investigate a concept of service-based dominant logic, define it, reveal its dimensions, theoretical framework, and managerial implications. Design/methodology/approach: the topic is approached by theoretical analysis and conceptual development. Using a definition of the dominant logic as a mind set or a world view the present article suggests ‘service-based dominant logic’ as a name for a generic theoretical concept instead of the widely used ‘service-dominant logic’ which can be easily misinterpreted as logic dominated by service only. Service-based dominant logic is ‘pure’ logic of service: it considers service as the fundamental basis of business and doesn’t include any goods-centric aspects. This logic relates to a firm’s facilitation and support of customer value creation processes using different types of resources obtained from a company. Findings: the study proposed the definition and revealed three dimensions of service-based dominant logic found in the relevant literature: ‘service logic’, ‘service-dominant logic’ and ‘customer-dominant logic’. The study showed similarities and differences between these three research streams in regard to how they defined a value, a product, a service, value creation, role of customer, role of company, and how important interactions were in value creation. The paper also described the theoretical framework of service-based dominant logic: it stated that service-based dominant logic had originated from service marketing, relationship marketing and value creation literature, and it interrelated with customer relationship management and business networks and channels research. Finally, the article classified the managerial implications of service-based dominant logic into three groups: company’s decision making, company’s organizing and company’s activities. Originality: the paper contributes conceptually to the service marketing literature by delineating the concept of service-based dominant logic. This term that before have not been widely used serves as the “umbrella” for three research streams exploring service as business perspective: ‘service logic’, ‘service-dominant logic’ and ‘customer-dominant logic’. This approach allows making deeper comparison between the main propositions of these research streams that could be interesting for the academic community for further application of research methods to collect empirical data from the corporate sector to check the findings.
  • Dube, Apramey; Helkkula, Anu (Emerald Group Publishing Ltd., 2015-04-14)
  • Kowalkowski, Christian; Kindström, Daniel; Alejandro, Thomas; Brege, Staffan; Biggemann, Sergio (Elsevier Inc., 2012)
    As product markets mature, firms are increasingly offering industrial services, in order to differentiate themselves and remain competitive. The general strategic view emerging from the services literature is that service infusion in manufacturing industries takes a somewhat unidirectional path from products to service provision. Based on in-depth case study research in the materials handling industry and drawing on Lindblom's (1979) concept of disjointed incrementalism, this study shows how service infusion often takes place in small steps without clearly directed efforts. The study identifies elements of incrementalism central to service infusion and demonstrates how a successful service strategy involves continuous modifications, adaptability, the seizing of ad hoc innovation, a continuous recalibration of opportunities, and the management of intertwining goals. The study introduces the concept of agile incrementalism; this concept aptly describes this contingency approach. The article contributes to a multifaceted and nuanced picture of service strategy and the service-infusion process.
  • Kindström, Daniel; Kowalkowski, Christian (Emerald Group Publishing Ltd., 2014)
  • Lindberg-Repo, Kirsti Helena; Dube, Apramey (2010-09-16)
  • Heinonen, Kristina; Helkkula, Anu; Holmlund, Maria (Emerald Group Publishing Ltd., 2013)
  • Lindman, Juho (Universidad de Talca, 2014-09-01)
  • de Bakker, Frank G. A.; den Hond, Frank; King, Brayden; Weber, Klaus (Sage Publications Ltd., 2013)
    F.G.A. de Bakker, F. den Hond, B.G. King, K. Weber (2013), Social Movements, Civil Society and Corporations: Taking Stock and Looking Ahead, Organization Studies Vol.34, No.3, pp.573-593 The relationships between social movements and civil society on the one hand, and the corporate world on the other hand, are often shaped by conflict over the domination of economic, cultural and social life. How this conflict plays out, in current as well as in historical times and places, is the central question that unites the papers in this special issue. In this essay, we review the differences and points of contact between the study of social movements, civil society and corporations, and offer an agenda for future research at this intersection that also frames the papers in the special issue. We suggest that three research areas are becoming increasingly important: the blurring of the three empirical domains and corresponding opportunities for theoretical integration, the institutional and cultural embeddedness of strategic interaction processes between agents, and the consequences of contestation and collaboration. The papers in this special issue are introduced in how they speak to these questions.
  • Eränti, Veikko; Lindman, Juho (Valtiotieteellinen yhdistys, 2014-09-01)
  • Kovacs, Gyöngyi (Kogan Page, 2011)
  • Virk, Nader Shahzad; Butt, Hilal Anwar (Springer New York LLC, 2014-07-24)
    The evaluation for the specification errors of asset-pricing models is conducted using numerous characteristic portfolios for the Finnish stock market. The selection of the market is motivated by the atypical setting wherein few firms dominate the total market capitalization and small numbers of stocks are listed. We report diverging risk-returns trade-offs for the average tendencies of the stocks and for the actual growth in the invested stocks. We show Carhart (1997) model produces the smallest pricing errors across all the tested specifications although with different significant risk for EW and VW test portfolios. Deviations in the significant risk factors in the asset pricing tests becomes prevalent for using a simple technique of equally weighted (EW) and value weighted (VW) test assets. We suggest more cautious analyses for markets that have peculiar features instead of generalizing to standard evidence.