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Now showing items 55-74 of 74
  • Dube, Apramey; Helkkula, Anu (Emerald Group Publishing Ltd., 2015-04-14)
  • Kowalkowski, Christian; Kindström, Daniel; Alejandro, Thomas; Brege, Staffan; Biggemann, Sergio (Elsevier Inc., 2012)
    As product markets mature, firms are increasingly offering industrial services, in order to differentiate themselves and remain competitive. The general strategic view emerging from the services literature is that service infusion in manufacturing industries takes a somewhat unidirectional path from products to service provision. Based on in-depth case study research in the materials handling industry and drawing on Lindblom's (1979) concept of disjointed incrementalism, this study shows how service infusion often takes place in small steps without clearly directed efforts. The study identifies elements of incrementalism central to service infusion and demonstrates how a successful service strategy involves continuous modifications, adaptability, the seizing of ad hoc innovation, a continuous recalibration of opportunities, and the management of intertwining goals. The study introduces the concept of agile incrementalism; this concept aptly describes this contingency approach. The article contributes to a multifaceted and nuanced picture of service strategy and the service-infusion process.
  • Kindström, Daniel; Kowalkowski, Christian (Emerald Group Publishing Ltd., 2014)
  • Lindberg-Repo, Kirsti Helena; Dube, Apramey (2010-09-16)
  • Heinonen, Kristina; Helkkula, Anu; Holmlund, Maria (Emerald Group Publishing Ltd., 2013)
  • Lindman, Juho (Universidad de Talca, 2014-09-01)
  • Eränti, Veikko; Lindman, Juho (Valtiotieteellinen yhdistys, 2014-09-01)
  • Virk, Nader Shahzad; Butt, Hilal Anwar (Springer New York LLC, 2014-07-24)
    The evaluation for the specification errors of asset-pricing models is conducted using numerous characteristic portfolios for the Finnish stock market. The selection of the market is motivated by the atypical setting wherein few firms dominate the total market capitalization and small numbers of stocks are listed. We report diverging risk-returns trade-offs for the average tendencies of the stocks and for the actual growth in the invested stocks. We show Carhart (1997) model produces the smallest pricing errors across all the tested specifications although with different significant risk for EW and VW test portfolios. Deviations in the significant risk factors in the asset pricing tests becomes prevalent for using a simple technique of equally weighted (EW) and value weighted (VW) test assets. We suggest more cautious analyses for markets that have peculiar features instead of generalizing to standard evidence.
  • Holmlund, Maria; Strandvik, Tore (Emerald Group Publishing Ltd., 2005)
  • Mickelsson, Karl-Jacob (2011)
    The paper presents activities within consumer practices as context for service usage, and shows how consumers’ requirements for a service differ depending on their surrounding systems of practice. Practices are units of socially informed and meaning-laden behaviour that people carry out as a part of their daily life. Interviews with five wine consumers revealed five different contexts for the services of a wine store. Activities within the practice were divided into having cognitive, affective or informational purposes, and were arranged into an “activity tree”, where the position and function of the service could be observed.
  • Widenius, Michael "Monty"; Nyman, Linus Morten (Talent First Network, 2014-01-29)
    This article is meant as a primer for those interested in gaining a basic understanding of the business of open source software. Thus, we cover four main areas: i) what motivates businesses to get involved in open source; ii) common open source licenses and how they relate to community and corporate interests; iii) issues regarding the monetization of an open source program; and iv) open source business models currently employed. This article is particularly suitable for people who want a general understanding of the business of open source software; people who want to understand the significant issues regarding an open source program's potential to generate income; and entrepreneurs who want to create a company around open source code.
  • Fougère, Martin; Moulettes, Agneta (Routledge (Taylor & Francis), 2007)
  • Laakso, Mikael; Kiviniemi, Arto (International Council for Research and Innovation in Building and Construction, 2012)
    IFC (Industry Foundation Classes) is an open and standardized data model intended to enable interoperability between building information modeling software applications in the AEC/FM industry. IFC has been in development by an industry consortium since 1994, and since the start of the effort, the evolving industry context, standardization organization, resource availability, and technology development have exposed the standardization process to a dynamic environment. While the overarching mission of IFC standardization has always been to enable interoperability between AEC/FM software applications, the approach for how best to operationalize that mission has changed over the years. Through a literature review supported by the general theory on IT standardization, this study follows the development process of the IFC standard from its origins in the early 1990s to its latest activities in 2012. The end result is both a descriptive review of the history of IFC standardization and the establishment of an initial connection to IT standardization research for the IFC standard by profiling the effort in accordance with existing IT standardization theories and typologies. The review highlights the evolution of IFC standardization through several distinct phases, and its gradual movement from emphasizing technical architecture development towards growing involvement in specifying the processes facilitating its use. The organization behind the standard has also seen changes in its modus operandi, from initially being a closed and loosely coupled alliance to evolving into a consortium incorporating open hybrid standardization, where a formal standards body publishes the standards prepared by the consortium. The consortium has faced many challenges compiling an ambitious interoperability standard with few resources, and were it not for the growing demand for the standard provided by public actors, momentum and enthusiasm for the effort might have petered out due to slow market uptake and low use of the data standard in actual construction projects thus far. While this paper does not investigate the adoption phenomenon in-depth, the moderate uptake of the standard can perhaps be explained to be a symptom of the slow adoption of collaborative model-based construction processes and industry reluctance to switch over to new IT tools, which in turn are prerequisites for the existence of demand for an open interoperability standard.
  • Strandvik, Tore; Holmlund, Maria; Grönroos, Christian (Emerald Group Publishing Ltd., 2014-03-26)
    Special Issue: Back where we belong – Marketing as the organization’s core strategy
  • Dube, Apramey; Helkkula, Anu; Strandvik, Tore (2014-06-15)
  • Lindberg-Repo, Kirsti Helena; Dube, Apramey (Brand Audit Group, 2014)
    TITANS OF SERVICE combines theory with practical insights, examples and references from experts. Bringing together 14 service experts, this book offers the most up-to-date knowledge from this field of academia in the U.S., Europe and Asia. In addition to offering theoretical insights, practical guidance and examples, this book also gives an overview of the current and future role of services. Titans of Service provides a framework for thinking about ways in which new knowledge on services is integrated with high profit and growth. This book is a guide for everyone interested in managing services profitably. It is based on substantial research with leading academic experts whom we call Titans, and provides a practical and insightful framework for business leaders, the educational community and students.
  • Kindström, Daniel; Kowalkowski, Christian; Nordin, Fredrik (Emerald Group Publishing Ltd., 2012)
    Purpose – The purpose of this paper is to explore strategies for visualizing the value of service-based offerings in a B2B context. By taking a process perspective on the offering life cycle, this paper also aims at distinguishing which visualization strategies are most appropriate using at which life-cycle stages. Design/methodology/approach – The study employed a qualitative, multiple-case study research design involving five manufacturing firms. Findings – Primary findings are that firms need to make use of several different visualization strategies depending on, among other things, the key stakeholders and also where the firm's offering is currently positioned in the service-based offering life cycle. Research limitations/implications – While the empirical data is from only one sector – i.e. manufacturing – managers from other B2B sectors should have an interest in the results and the key aspects identified. Further research could also establish linkages to performance metrics. Originality/value – Visualization strategies have been relatively rarely studied from a B2B perspective, and the process dimension, especially, is novel.
  • Holmlund, Maria; Törnroos, Jan-Åke (Emerald Group Publishing, 1997)
  • Kowalkowski, Christian; Windahl, Charlotta; Kindström, Daniel; Gebauer, Heiko (Elsevier Inc., 2015)
    Both academics and practitioners emphasize the importance for product firms of implementing service-led growth strategies. The service transition concept is well established, namely a unidirectional repositioning along a product-service continuum—from basic, product-oriented services towards more customized, process-oriented ones—ultimately leading to the provision of solutions. We challenge this service transition assumption and develop alternative ones regarding how product firms should pursue service-led growth. Using ‘problematization methodology’, and drawing on findings from thirteen system suppliers, we identify three service-led growth trajectories: (1) becoming an availability provider, which is the focus of most transition literature; (2) becoming a performance provider, which resembles project-based sales and implies an even greater differentiation of what customers are offered; and, (3) becoming an ‘industrializer’, which is about standardizing previously customized solutions to promote repeatability and scalability. Based on our critical inquiry, we develop two alternative assumptions: (a) firms need to constantly balance business expansion and standardization activities; and (b) manage the co-existence of different system supplier roles. Finally, we consider the implications for implementing service-led growth strategies of the alternative assumptions.