Browsing by Issue Date

Sort by: Order: Results:

Now showing items 1-20 of 142
  • Lindman, Juho (AIS, 2015-08-18)
  • Manai, Aicha; Holmlund, Maria (Emerald, 2015-08-01)
  • Neganova, Irina; Heinonen, Kristina; Jaakkola, Elina (2015-06-09)
  • Dube, Apramey; Helkkula, Anu (Emerald Group Publishing Ltd., 2015-04-14)
  • Välikangas, Liisa (Cambridge University Press, 2015-03-01)
    I am honored to join the MOR editorial team as the editor for Dialogue, Debate, and Discussion. My commitment is to facilitate dialogue, debate, and discussion on management and organization theory that is rooted in practice in emerging economies yet has implications beyond. Let us learn ‘slowly’ (cf. Levinthal & March, 1993) and resist too fast convergence to Western management methods before we have a chance to better understand and assimilate the divergence around the world.
  • Maley, Jane; Kowalkowski, Christian; Brege, Staffan; Biggemann, Sergio (Emerald, 2015)
    Purpose The aim of the article is to analyze the rationale for choice of suppliers and the influence these decisions have on the firm’s capabilities. Design/methodology/approach We examine the choice of in-house operations versus buying maintenance in the Swedish mining industry through a qualitative case study approach. Findings The findings reveal a strong tendency to outsource maintenance. Research limitations/implications This in turn has a strong influence on the firm’s capabilities and long-term competitive advantage and sustainability. Practical implications Based on the empirical findings, we comment on the strength and weaknesses of the different outsourcing and attempt to find practical solutions that assist the firm in creating competitive advantage. Originality/value The unique contribution of this study is that it extends prior firm capabilities studies by investigating the impact of capability loss specifically in complex, intricate maintenance processes in a dynamic industry.
  • Aspara, Jaakko; Chakravarti, Amitav (Emerald Group Publishing Ltd., 2015)
  • Lindman, Juho; Kinnari, Tomi; Rossi, Matti (I E E E, 2015)
  • Laakso, Mikael (University of Helsinki, 2015)
    Engagement in learning activities enhance the level of learning among students. However, when class sizes grow, such engagement can be difficult to achieve. The learning methods that work well in small classes might not work as well, or even be practically feasible, in large lecture halls. When students remain anonymous and cannot be given individual attention there is a challenge in ensuring high quality learning. In an attempt to address this challenge, the study explores ways to pro- mote active learning in the context of large lecture classes. Based on a review of the fundamentals of active learning in the literature, this article presents a range of methods that can be used to facilitate active learning among students in larger classes. Concluding the article is a description of a practical implementation where some of the suggested learning activities are applied and discussed in the context of an actual university course at the Hanken School of Economics taught by the author.
  • Kindström, Daniel; Kowalkowski, Christian; Alejandro, Thomas (Emerald Group Publishing Ltd., 2015)
    Purpose The objective of this research is to explore the implications for the sales function of the infusion of services by formerly product-based firms. In particular, it aims at identifying the changes that need to be made at the sales-function level if the services are to be successfully sold. Design/Methodology This research is an exploratory qualitative case study. Data were collected by focus group discussions and in-depth interviews with relevant managers in three large multinational companies based in Northern Europe, which were pursuing service-led growth. Findings The effects of service infusion processes on the sales function could be seen with respect to the three parts of the analytical framework: organization, roles, and competences. The results illustrate the need for a changed perspective with respect to all three parts, if a product-based firm is to be successful in the infusing of associated services into its portfolio of offerings. Analysis of the results identifies key operational initiatives that management needs to understand and implement when corporate and marketing strategies increasingly focus on service-led growth. Research limitations The study was exploratory and vendor centric, which means that it did not quantitatively assess the results or directly involve the customers at whom the services were directed. Also, the choice of business-to-business firms limits the capacity to generalize the findings. Originality/Value Whereas relationship-based and value-based selling are approaches more geared to the sales-force level, the study reported in this paper set out to understand fundamental differences at the sales-function level when firms pursue service-led growth. The findings suggest that the realignment of corporate strategy towards an increased focus on services may have far-reaching implications for the sales function.
  • Kowalkowski, Christian; Windahl, Charlotta; Kindström, Daniel; Gebauer, Heiko (Elsevier Inc., 2015)
    Both academics and practitioners emphasize the importance for product firms of implementing service-led growth strategies. The service transition concept is well established, namely a unidirectional repositioning along a product-service continuum—from basic, product-oriented services towards more customized, process-oriented ones—ultimately leading to the provision of solutions. We challenge this service transition assumption and develop alternative ones regarding how product firms should pursue service-led growth. Using ‘problematization methodology’, and drawing on findings from thirteen system suppliers, we identify three service-led growth trajectories: (1) becoming an availability provider, which is the focus of most transition literature; (2) becoming a performance provider, which resembles project-based sales and implies an even greater differentiation of what customers are offered; and, (3) becoming an ‘industrializer’, which is about standardizing previously customized solutions to promote repeatability and scalability. Based on our critical inquiry, we develop two alternative assumptions: (a) firms need to constantly balance business expansion and standardization activities; and (b) manage the co-existence of different system supplier roles. Finally, we consider the implications for implementing service-led growth strategies of the alternative assumptions.
  • Holmén, Martin; Wang, Peng (M.E.Sharpe, 2015)
    This paper investigates Initial Public Offerings (IPOs) of high-tech firms on the Chinese Growth Enterprise Market (GEM). Almost half of the GEM IPOs are set up in pyramid structures. The likelihood of a pyramid structure increases with the size of the IPO firm and state control. Our results do not suggest that pyramids are set up to overcome financial constraints. However, we document that pyramid IPOs are discounted before the IPO. The subscription price to book ratio is significantly lower for pyramid IPOs and this translates into higher underpricing. We conclude that IPO investors demand a higher risk-premium when investing in pyramid IPOs.
  • Eränti, Veikko; Lindman, Juho (Valtiotieteellinen yhdistys, 2014-09-01)
  • Lindman, Juho (Universidad de Talca, 2014-09-01)
  • Virk, Nader Shahzad; Butt, Hilal Anwar (Springer New York LLC, 2014-07-24)
    The evaluation for the specification errors of asset-pricing models is conducted using numerous characteristic portfolios for the Finnish stock market. The selection of the market is motivated by the atypical setting wherein few firms dominate the total market capitalization and small numbers of stocks are listed. We report diverging risk-returns trade-offs for the average tendencies of the stocks and for the actual growth in the invested stocks. We show Carhart (1997) model produces the smallest pricing errors across all the tested specifications although with different significant risk for EW and VW test portfolios. Deviations in the significant risk factors in the asset pricing tests becomes prevalent for using a simple technique of equally weighted (EW) and value weighted (VW) test assets. We suggest more cautious analyses for markets that have peculiar features instead of generalizing to standard evidence.
  • Dube, Apramey; Helkkula, Anu; Strandvik, Tore (2014-06-15)
  • Neganova, Irina (2014-06)
    Purpose: to investigate a concept of service-based dominant logic, define it, reveal its dimensions, theoretical framework, and managerial implications. Design/methodology/approach: the topic is approached by theoretical analysis and conceptual development. Using a definition of the dominant logic as a mind set or a world view the present article suggests ‘service-based dominant logic’ as a name for a generic theoretical concept instead of the widely used ‘service-dominant logic’ which can be easily misinterpreted as logic dominated by service only. Service-based dominant logic is ‘pure’ logic of service: it considers service as the fundamental basis of business and doesn’t include any goods-centric aspects. This logic relates to a firm’s facilitation and support of customer value creation processes using different types of resources obtained from a company. Findings: the study proposed the definition and revealed three dimensions of service-based dominant logic found in the relevant literature: ‘service logic’, ‘service-dominant logic’ and ‘customer-dominant logic’. The study showed similarities and differences between these three research streams in regard to how they defined a value, a product, a service, value creation, role of customer, role of company, and how important interactions were in value creation. The paper also described the theoretical framework of service-based dominant logic: it stated that service-based dominant logic had originated from service marketing, relationship marketing and value creation literature, and it interrelated with customer relationship management and business networks and channels research. Finally, the article classified the managerial implications of service-based dominant logic into three groups: company’s decision making, company’s organizing and company’s activities. Originality: the paper contributes conceptually to the service marketing literature by delineating the concept of service-based dominant logic. This term that before have not been widely used serves as the “umbrella” for three research streams exploring service as business perspective: ‘service logic’, ‘service-dominant logic’ and ‘customer-dominant logic’. This approach allows making deeper comparison between the main propositions of these research streams that could be interesting for the academic community for further application of research methods to collect empirical data from the corporate sector to check the findings.