Publications syncronized from Haris

 

Nyligen publicerat

  • Cooren, François; Vaara, Eero; Langley, Ann; Tsoukas, Haridimos (Oxford University Press, 2014)
    Abstract: Studying language and communication at work implies that we connect them to the very processes, activities, and practices that constitute organizations or organizational phenomena. We demonstrate in this chapter that language and communication at work can mean many things and that there are a variety of theoretical and methodological approaches that can be used for such analysis. Four characteristic features of such studies are highlighted: (1) interest in the communicative constitution of organization, (2) focus on discursive or communicative practices, (3) emphasis on temporal aspects and dynamics, and (4) placing language and communication in its sociomaterial context. Not all studies can focus on all these aspects, but these features are central in this nascent stream of research.
  • Strandvik, Tore; Holmlund, Maria; Grönroos, Christian (Emerald Group Publishing Ltd., 2014)
    Special Issue: Back where we belong – Marketing as the organization’s core strategy
  • Aspara, Jaakko; Chakravarti, Amitav (Emerald Group Publishing Ltd., 2015)
  • Kowalkowski, Christian; Windahl, Charlotta; Kindström, Daniel; Gebauer, Heiko (Elsevier Inc., 2015)
    Both academics and practitioners emphasize the importance for product firms of implementing service-led growth strategies. The service transition concept is well established, namely a unidirectional repositioning along a product-service continuum—from basic, product-oriented services towards more customized, process-oriented ones—ultimately leading to the provision of solutions. We challenge this service transition assumption and develop alternative ones regarding how product firms should pursue service-led growth. Using ‘problematization methodology’, and drawing on findings from thirteen system suppliers, we identify three service-led growth trajectories: (1) becoming an availability provider, which is the focus of most transition literature; (2) becoming a performance provider, which resembles project-based sales and implies an even greater differentiation of what customers are offered; and, (3) becoming an ‘industrializer’, which is about standardizing previously customized solutions to promote repeatability and scalability. Based on our critical inquiry, we develop two alternative assumptions: (a) firms need to constantly balance business expansion and standardization activities; and (b) manage the co-existence of different system supplier roles. Finally, we consider the implications for implementing service-led growth strategies of the alternative assumptions.
  • Holmlund-Rytkönen, Maria; Strandvik, Tore (Emerald Group Publishing Ltd., 2005)
  • Edvardsson, Bo; Holmlund, Maria; Strandvik, Tore (Elsevier Inc., 2008)
  • Holmlund-Rytkönen, Maria; Törnroos, Jan-Åke (Emerald Group Publishing, 1997)
  • Holmlund, Maria; Hobbs, Päivi (Emerald Group Publishing Ltd., 2009)
  • Holmlund, Maria (Emerald Group Publishing Ltd., 2008)
  • Holmlund-Rytkönen, Maria; Strandvik, Tore (Emerald Group Publishing, 1999)
  • Holmlund-Rytkönen, Maria; Kock, Sören (Elsevier Inc., 1995)
  • Holmlund-Rytkönen, Maria (Elsevier Inc., 2004)
  • Lipkin, Michaela; Heinonen, Kristina (2014)
  • Butt, Hilal; Virk, Nader Shahzad (Wiley-Blackwell Publishing Ltd., 2014)
    This paper presents a simplified single period asset-pricing model adjusted for liquidity and tests it for the Nordic markets. The detailed empirical evidence is presented from Finnish test case. Empirical testing of small yet developed markets is motivated by the increased relevance of the illiquidity effect for illiquid assets/markets. The main evidence reports liquidity risk makes sufficiently larger part of predicted factor risk premium than the market risk, contrary to comparable US evidence. This highlights the ability of liquidity related model betas in capturing the time variation in expected returns across illiquid (Nordic) markets than market beta.
  • Virk, Nader Shahzad; Butt, Hilal Anwar (Springer New York LLC, 2014)
    The evaluation for the specification errors of asset-pricing models is conducted using numerous characteristic portfolios for the Finnish stock market. The selection of the market is motivated by the atypical setting wherein few firms dominate the total market capitalization and small numbers of stocks are listed. We report diverging risk-returns trade-offs for the average tendencies of the stocks and for the actual growth in the invested stocks. We show Carhart (1997) model produces the smallest pricing errors across all the tested specifications although with different significant risk for EW and VW test portfolios. Deviations in the significant risk factors in the asset pricing tests becomes prevalent for using a simple technique of equally weighted (EW) and value weighted (VW) test assets. We suggest more cautious analyses for markets that have peculiar features instead of generalizing to standard evidence.