The new faces of nest predation in agricultural landscapes : a wildlife camera survey with artificial nests

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http://hdl.handle.net/10138/275482

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Krüger , H , Väänänen , V-M , Holopainen , S & Nummi , P 2018 , ' The new faces of nest predation in agricultural landscapes : a wildlife camera survey with artificial nests ' , European Journal of Wildlife Research , vol. 64 , no. 6 , 76 . https://doi.org/10.1007/s10344-018-1233-7

Title: The new faces of nest predation in agricultural landscapes : a wildlife camera survey with artificial nests
Author: Krüger, Heidi; Väänänen, Veli-Matti; Holopainen, Sari; Nummi, Petri
Contributor organization: Department of Forest Sciences
Wetland Ecology Group
University Management
Forest Ecology and Management
Date: 2018-12
Language: eng
Number of pages: 11
Belongs to series: European Journal of Wildlife Research
ISSN: 1612-4642
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/s10344-018-1233-7
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/10138/275482
Abstract: European populations of many ground-nesting farmland birds have declined in recent decades. Increases in predator populations and nest predation may play an important role in this decline, along with habitat loss. However, the role of various predators has often remained unclear. We conducted a study with artificial nests and wildlife cameras (n=104) in agricultural landscapes during 2015-2016 in South Finland. Our trials formed a 400-m wide gradient from forest to field. The aim of our study was to monitor nest survival and nest predators in a spatial and temporal scale. We tested the effect of distance to the forest and nest visibility to nest predation. During an 8-day period, 39.4% of the artificial nests were predated. Fifty percent of the predators were birds, 40% mammals, and 10% remained unknown. The three dominant predators of our artificial nests were the raccoon dog (Nyctereutes procyonoides) with 11 nests and the hooded crow (Corvus corone cornix) and the magpie (Pica pica) with 10 depredated nests each. Our analysis indicates that avian predators preyed upon nests in open fields further away from the forest edge, whereas mammalian predation concentrated closer to the forest edge. Predation occurred more likely at the beginning of the survey and nest survival increased as days passed. Our study highlights the efficiency of using wildlife camera traps in nest predation studies. We also suggest that the ongoing expansion of alien predators across Europe may have a greater impact on ground-nesting bird populations than previously anticipated.
Subject: Nest predation
Edge effect
Farmland birds
Phasianus colchicus
Nyctereutes procyonoides
Wildlife camera trap
BREEDING SUCCESS
HABITAT USE
BIRDS
DENSITY
FRAGMENTATION
ABUNDANCE
SURVIVAL
REMOVAL
SITE
1181 Ecology, evolutionary biology
Peer reviewed: Yes
Rights: cc_by
Usage restriction: openAccess
Self-archived version: publishedVersion


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